Hurricane and Windstorm Deductibles

CADO Admin

The source of the information below is the Insurance Information Institute, iii.org

Nineteen states and the District of Columbia have hurricane deductibles: Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia and Washington DC. Listed below are reports for these states detailing hurricane deductibles.

 


E&O Coverage

CADO Admin

Subject: E&O Coverage
Description

 I don't see anything regarding E & O insurance mentioned. As independent adjusters do folks carry this type of protection as do most Realtors?

Thanks...


URL: http://catadjuster.org/Forums/tabid/60/aft/9334/Default.aspx
Source: Forum Past by 2roadrunners - 15 Replies


Safety and roofs

CADO Admin

Speaking of roofs, my driving around the south and central Texas area finds that the developers are building houses in the new subdivisions with roofs that are not meant to be climbed. Steep, cut-up, mostly two stories. The old days of the accessible 4/12 ranch style house roof have been gone since the mid-1980's.

Increasingly, I am of the opinion that a preferred way to investigate these roofs are with a truck mounted crane and lift bucket. Our safety is now, more than ever, being compromised by inherently dangerous roof designs.


NFIP Claims Manual Effective June 1, 2019

National Flood Insurance Program

Roy

The Publication Date  of the most current manual is: June 1, 2019

The purpose of the NFIP Claims Manual is to improve clarity of claims guidance to WYOs, vendors, adjusters, and examiners so that policyholders experience consistency and reliability of service. The manual provides processes for handling claims from the notice of loss to final payment.

All NFIP bulletins, other than those announcing Flood Insurance Claims Office numbers, Flood Response Office locations, claims adjuster briefings, and current/future program changes, are superseded by this manual and of no further effect. 

Source: NFIP


Newbie Adjuster Advice

CADO Admin

Subject: Newbie Adjuster Advice
Description

Greetings! My name is Zach and I recently got my GA adjusters license in August and I'm looking for a little advice on how to get started and get more involved in the industry. I know a couple of independent adjusters here in Athens and they are assigned a couple of claims here and there but I'm thinking I want to start out working for a company for the first couple of years until I get some experience under my belt. I know that Crawford looks for experienced adjusters but unfortunately I don't have it at this point.

Is there anything I can do to connect with other adjusters that are willing to train me and show me the ropes? I have scoping pretty much down.My next step is to take a class and master Xactimate. Have a great day everyone and I look forward to your responses!

Best Regards,
Zach


URL: http://www.catadjuster.org/Forums/tabid/60/afv/topic/aff/67/aft/10970/afpg/1/Default.aspx
Source: Active Forum Post by Zack - 40 Replies (so far)


LADDER/CLIMBING SAFETY

CADO Admin

Subject: LADDER/CLIMBING SAFETY
First Posted on Saturday, September 02, 2000 - 1:32 pm: By: Lyndon

Bottom Line: Too Many Falls Last Year!!

1.) Take time to evaluate your ascension. Look at all slopes and valleys. Two and three story structures call for the utmost of attention and care. Ladder pulls are a particularly risky effort and deserve your utmost care.

2.) Do NOT be afraid to say NO! If you are very concerned about a particular roof, GET HELP! Local roofers are always willing to assist you! IF you ask the carrier, most of the will give their blessing as opposed to having you fall!

3.) A variety of ladders is not a bad idea. It offers you choices that you would not otherwise have.

 

... more


S.C. Private Flood Insurance Act Enacted, Aims to Make Flood Insurance More Accessible

Source: SC DOI Press Release

Roy

From the September 30, 2020 Press Release

"Columbia, S.C. – Monday, Governor Henry McMaster signed the South Carolina Private Flood Insurance Act into law (S. 882). This Act aims to foster innovative flood insurance coverage in South Carolina, allowing insurers the ability to test products in the market and offer consumers greater choice for flood insurance coverage. "


Historical Hurricane Tracks

CADO Admin

Subject: Historical Hurricane Tracks
Description: The Historical Hurricane Tracks tool is an interactive mapping application that allows you to easily search and display Atlantic Basin and Eastern North Pacific Basin tropical cyclone data. 

Source: NOAA Climate.gov 
 


Repost: Just got 58 new claims, what do I do now?

Anonym

Newt, here is a new thread for you or whoever else may be interested. Again, I emphasize that each topic like this should have its own identifiable thread, so as in the event that it develops into anything, and as a result has some future value, it can be found.

Here is the scenario - stick within its framework - consider it 'real' and start to develop your own 'flow' as opposed to relying on others, and offer it up for critique and refinement if necessary. Maybe by the time it has gone through the grinder, if there is sufficient participation, it will evolve into a useful general template.

A fairly significant hail storm ('hail' used because it is the least cumbersome peril regarding the effect the damage has etc) passed through ClaimCity on Thursday May 1/03.

Saturday May 3rd at 9.00AM a vendor called you and after a 'know before you go' chat (which is not part of this thread) you agreed and were deployed by the vendor.


Bad Credit Disqualify New Adjuster?

Anonym

My credit was perfect until 2009, Then I was out of work for a while, and my credit record tanked bad.  I was 60,90, even 180 days late reported for a long time (years) before I caught up. Never defaulted on my mortgage or car loans but the payment history is bad until about 2 years ago. Two collection accounts I was unaware of are on my credit report.  They did not have my contact information so I was never notified.   When I found out and contacted me, they had offered a 50% payment settlement offer.  I declined but paid 100% of what I owed.  Now my negative record shows two small credit cards that were closed and sold as a charge off to collection companies.  Only one collection company is on my record.  I paid the collection companies in full, will this type of negative record disqualify me from being an adjuster?  I already have a TX License, but Pilot's website said those with record of financial irresponsibility need not apply. 


Becoming an Adjuster

From the Forum Archive

CADO Admin

Subject: Becoming an Adjuster
Description: Fourm Archive Post by Clayton Carr

Came across something the other day that maybe has some relevance in this thread.
"10 habits of Highly Effective Adjusters", it is on the web version of Claims Mag (August 2001), but I'll summarize the points.

(1) Reading - An effective adjuster can actually read and comprehend a policy. That is, they know the coverage, they what the policy says. Also, an effective adjuster must be able to read and comprehend the technical correspondence related to the claims they handle. For property adjusters that would include engineers and fire investigators reports. A liability adjuster to be effective must be able to read and comprehend court documents and medical reports. To be effective, you must be able to understand and convey to others the technical details of a claim.

(2) Writing - "Check-off" and short forms reports as well as email have eroded this skill. The effective adjuster has the ability to prepare professional correspondence.

(3) Keeping a diary - a suspense diary is just about the most basic tool one can use in handling claims. When our peers review an open file that shows no activity for two months, one of three things is happening; (a) the adjuster is not using a diary, (b) the adjuster is not keeping notes, (c) the adjuster is doing nothing. What's the alternative to a diary? You must wait for something to happen and react to it. An effective adjuster does not do that.

(4) Keeping activity notes - One of your greatest challenges will be the first day you sit for a discovery / deposition, or find yourself in the witness stand of a court room; and try and remember with clarity what you did on a file four years ago. Adjusters notes are the only way to tell what is happening on a file. Activity notes provide the history of how a claim was handled and effective adjusters always make an entry each time they "touch" a file.

(5) Keeping others informed - Communication is key to an effective adjuster. Consider being a DAPIST - detailed as possible, in simpliest terms. Communicating regularly with all concerned parties is critical to success.

(6) Learning - A great deal of adjuster training is task oriented. That sort of training taught you how to fill out forms, how to measure a building, how to estimate damage, how to photograph and how to take a statement. If all you learn are "tasks", then you will only be capable of doing tasks. An effective adjuster never stops learning. An effective adjuster will learn about human relations and how the claim adjustment process fits into the insurance "big picture".

(7) Don't beat a dead horse - or "dog files" by another name; those files that just seem to linger on and don't get closed. There comes a time in every claim where an effective adjuster must be an "adjuster", and use the skills of an adjuster to negotiate and bring the file to a resolution. The effective adjuster knows when to fight a battle, and when to concede.

(8) Don't burn your bridges - An effective adjuster is reasonable and fair in dealing with others, not stubborn and unyeilding. An effective adjuster knows that being reasonable and fair will make the job easier, but they al


Occupational Outlook Handbook

Provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

CADO Admin

Description:  for Claims Adjusters, Appraisers, Examiners, and Investigators

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor
The following is a TOC to the information provided in this online handbook.

Article info Updated 10/15/2020

 


Seven Newbie Questions

CADO Admin

Subject: Seven Newbie Questions
Description: Forum Past By Alex

 OK. Here I am. Just got my Georgia license (god, what a drag that was!) and ready to make millions   I've been in construcion for a few years (roofing estimator)  and dealt a lot with claim based construction work.  So, I just wanted to hear some advise from you guys, hardened in battles veterans....

 
So, here we go.
 
  1. How do I get in? What should my strategy be? Should I try to get hired by a large insurance company to gain some experience? State Farm? Allstate? Or should I just get on the rosters of as many independents as possible and wait for a lucky day?
  2. What are the advantages and disadvantages of being a staff adjuster vs independent?
  3. Is there enough work right now? I hear a lot of older guys are leaving the field. Does that mean, it would be easier for me to find work?
  4. How much you all guys make? Honestly, is it worth doing what you are doing?  How much a typical staff adjuster makes? Independent? In storm situation? In  a slow year?  In an average year?
  5. What is better residential or commercial claims? How can I get to work commercial claims?
  6. Flood and earthquake certifications?  Do I need them? Are they beneficial to me at this stage?
  7. How many licenses should I get? In which states?

NFIP Dwelling Form

CADO Admin

Subject: Policy: NFIP Dwelling Form
Description: Quote from FEMA;

The Dwelling Policy Form may be issued to homeowners, residential renters and condominium unit-owners, owners of residential buildings containing two to four units.

In communities participating in the NFIP Regular Program* or Emergency Program** the dwelling policy provides building and/or contents coverage for:

  • Detached, single-family, non-condominium residence with incidental occupancy limited to less than 50% of the total floor area;
  • Two- to four- family, non-condominium building with incidental occupancy limited to less than 25% of the total floor area;
  • Dwelling unit in residential condominium building;
  • Residential townhouse/rowhouse
  • Manufactured mobile homes

Cat Adjusting as a Profession (Is It For Me?)

Article Archive

Roy

From the Article Archive 
Title: Cat Adjusting as a Profession (Is It For Me?)
First Posted: Friday, November 26, 2004
Author: Gary White

 

 

My son is now ready to go to college away from home and excluding approximately 21 months in an attempt to try something different in my life as a "financial planner", I have been adjusting, supervising or investigating claims for almost 27 years. By the way, I have worked my share of hail, wind, tornado and hurricane cats for other carriers so I know from whence I speak. Even during the time while I was trying to become a "financial planner", I supplemented my income with adjusting temp jobs and contract adjusting work.

 

 


House Fire--A simulated claim for discussion

Source: Forum Post Started by Racko on 9/19/2006

CADO Admin

 To kill some time in this lull period & spread some knowledge, here is the scenario (or scenarios) as you see fit to make it. I will lay out the limited info as follows, and let's see where it goes.

Heavy fire loss occurs in a single family dwelling. Cov is HO-3, no issues with eff dates. Insureds have just left home about 6:00 p.m., a couple hours before fire breaks out and is discovered. High winds fan the flames and each house on either side sustain heat/smoke damage before the fire is brought under control. Let's say both neighboring houses now have some melted vinyl siding, one sided 2 years ago and the other 12 years ago. The elderly neighbor next door initially beat on the insured's door trying to see if they were OK, and burned his hand. He then rushed home to get his wheelchair bound wife out of their house, but she spends a week in the hospital with smoke inhalation related complications.

The insureds are a young couple, both smokers, with a 6 year old son. They just moved in about 2 years ago, only work in the house since they came was replacing the kitchen flooring, and adding a center island with a new cooktop on it. These were professionally installed within the past 6 months.

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