Just got 58 new claims, what do I do now?

Anonym

Newt, here is a new thread for you or whoever else may be interested. Again, I emphasize that each topic like this should have its own identifiable thread, so as in the event that it develops into anything, and as a result has some future value, it can be found.

Here is the scenario - stick within its framework - consider it 'real' and start to develop your own 'flow' as opposed to relying on others, and offer it up for critique and refinement if necessary. Maybe by the time it has gone through the grinder, if there is sufficient participation, it will evolve into a useful general template.

A fairly significant hail storm ('hail' used because it is the least cumbersome peril regarding the effect the damage has etc) passed through ClaimCity on Thursday May 1/03.

Saturday May 3rd at 9.00AM a vendor called you and after a 'know before you go' chat (which is not part of this thread) you agreed and were deployed by the vendor.


Couple of green questions

Forum Discussion

Anonym

"I'm very new to this forum and the adjusters industry. A friend told me the other day that I need to check in to a career in insurance adjustments. I had never thought about it but he insisted I check the internet to find out any information I can find.  He  told me that he knew another person that enjoyed working in this field and maybe I would too.  So far after reading through the forums I think it really sounds good to me. Traveling and helping people seems to stick out the most. I know that the real money will come in time but it would be worth my time and all my effort if I finally found a career that I enjoyed doing."

... more

 

 


Little bit of advice

Anonym
I am seeking a little bit of advice from some experienced adjusters. I currently sell Cadillacs and Hummers as everyone prolly knows the car business has not been the best. I have several friends that are adjusters and have done very well for themselves. I am wanting to know what is the best way for me to get into the business. I live in mobile al, and pilot is stationed here but you have to go through an evalution process to even be considered for employment. I am currently looking at several all lines online courses. Does anyone suggest a good company to get licensed with? I think the one I have been looking at is 1st choice training. I am not really looking to make a career out of this as of right now, but I have hear the success stories of people including my friends working these big storm and making a lot of money. I am very interested in doing this to pay off some debt. Does anyone suggest a good way of doing this for this storm season. I could have gone last year w/out a license for Gustav but i did not want to go unexperienced. Any advice would be appreciated.
 
Thanks,
David Lyon

Typical Phases of Claim Pmt First 3 Years of an Adjuster's Career

CADO Forum Archive

Anonym

Just a little insight to all new adjusters on what I have witnessed to be the progression of practice among new catastrophe adjusters in their first three years of claims work.

Stage # 1:  Demonstrated during in the first twelve months of career

Mindset: “Conservative” Not comfortable with allowing for large dollar settlement. Willing to ignore scope of damage in order to keep settlement amounts low to avoid perceived internal conflict with employer.
 
Consequences:  “Poor Production & Quality of Work”  30-75% of all claims returned by Team Manager to rework, 5-10% (which accounts for all random claims pulled for review) of closed claims returned by Reinspector to correct omissions, All estimates will require major reconciliation effort before any repair professional can begin project.

(The above is a post from the forum.)


The Facts About Your First/Next Storm Claims Assignment by CCS LLC

Source: Prior Forum Post

Anonym

Hello,

My name is Kevin Kramer and I am the owner of Catastrophe Career Specialties LLC (a storm claims training company located in Houston Tx) . I am posting this information today in response to several questions that  are asked of me quite frequently with the sincerest hopes that it will help all of those waiting for their first or next storm claims assignment.

A Little Bit About Me:  Eleven years experience as a catastrophe claims adjuster w/ State Farm Ins Companies (5 yrs staff & 6 yrs Independent). During that time I have worked in 21 states on 56 initial cat coded  assignments and will be the first to admit that I a still have a great deal to learn about the industry. I am a staunch opponent to politically correct Prozac speak, especially when it comes to decisions as important as starting / investing in a new career. Everyone who is considering entering the storm claims arena in entitled to hear the realities of what this industry has to offer.  I believe that a person’s true  success story can be found on top of the spot where their talents and passions intersect for this is the very place where all others cannot compete.

(The above is a post from a prior forum that is no longer available but you click on the title to read the complete post.)

 


How to write a Resume.org

CADO Admin

Subject: How to write a Resume.org
Description

Comments from the site:

"Site offers free cover letter, thank you letter, and resume writing tips. Research how to write a resume, distribute your resume to hiring managers, and tips for how to get an interview."
 


URL: http://www.how-to-write-a-resume.org/


Newbie Adjuster Advice

CADO Admin

Subject: Newbie Adjuster Advice
Description

Greetings! My name is Zach and I recently got my GA adjusters license in August and I'm looking for a little advice on how to get started and get more involved in the industry. I know a couple of independent adjusters here in Athens and they are assigned a couple of claims here and there but I'm thinking I want to start out working for a company for the first couple of years until I get some experience under my belt. I know that Crawford looks for experienced adjusters but unfortunately I don't have it at this point.

Is there anything I can do to connect with other adjusters that are willing to train me and show me the ropes? I have scoping pretty much down.My next step is to take a class and master Xactimate. Have a great day everyone and I look forward to your responses!

Best Regards,
Zach


URL: http://www.catadjuster.org/Forums/tabid/60/afv/topic/aff/67/aft/10970/afpg/1/Default.aspx
Source: Active Forum Post by Zack - 40 Replies (so far)


Bad Credit Disqualify New Adjuster?

Anonym

My credit was perfect until 2009, Then I was out of work for a while, and my credit record tanked bad.  I was 60,90, even 180 days late reported for a long time (years) before I caught up. Never defaulted on my mortgage or car loans but the payment history is bad until about 2 years ago. Two collection accounts I was unaware of are on my credit report.  They did not have my contact information so I was never notified.   When I found out and contacted me, they had offered a 50% payment settlement offer.  I declined but paid 100% of what I owed.  Now my negative record shows two small credit cards that were closed and sold as a charge off to collection companies.  Only one collection company is on my record.  I paid the collection companies in full, will this type of negative record disqualify me from being an adjuster?  I already have a TX License, but Pilot's website said those with record of financial irresponsibility need not apply. 


Becoming an Adjuster

From the Forum Archive

CADO Admin

Subject: Becoming an Adjuster
Description: Fourm Archive Post by Clayton Carr

Came across something the other day that maybe has some relevance in this thread.
"10 habits of Highly Effective Adjusters", it is on the web version of Claims Mag (August 2001), but I'll summarize the points.

(1) Reading - An effective adjuster can actually read and comprehend a policy. That is, they know the coverage, they what the policy says. Also, an effective adjuster must be able to read and comprehend the technical correspondence related to the claims they handle. For property adjusters that would include engineers and fire investigators reports. A liability adjuster to be effective must be able to read and comprehend court documents and medical reports. To be effective, you must be able to understand and convey to others the technical details of a claim.

(2) Writing - "Check-off" and short forms reports as well as email have eroded this skill. The effective adjuster has the ability to prepare professional correspondence.

(3) Keeping a diary - a suspense diary is just about the most basic tool one can use in handling claims. When our peers review an open file that shows no activity for two months, one of three things is happening; (a) the adjuster is not using a diary, (b) the adjuster is not keeping notes, (c) the adjuster is doing nothing. What's the alternative to a diary? You must wait for something to happen and react to it. An effective adjuster does not do that.

(4) Keeping activity notes - One of your greatest challenges will be the first day you sit for a discovery / deposition, or find yourself in the witness stand of a court room; and try and remember with clarity what you did on a file four years ago. Adjusters notes are the only way to tell what is happening on a file. Activity notes provide the history of how a claim was handled and effective adjusters always make an entry each time they "touch" a file.

(5) Keeping others informed - Communication is key to an effective adjuster. Consider being a DAPIST - detailed as possible, in simpliest terms. Communicating regularly with all concerned parties is critical to success.

(6) Learning - A great deal of adjuster training is task oriented. That sort of training taught you how to fill out forms, how to measure a building, how to estimate damage, how to photograph and how to take a statement. If all you learn are "tasks", then you will only be capable of doing tasks. An effective adjuster never stops learning. An effective adjuster will learn about human relations and how the claim adjustment process fits into the insurance "big picture".

(7) Don't beat a dead horse - or "dog files" by another name; those files that just seem to linger on and don't get closed. There comes a time in every claim where an effective adjuster must be an "adjuster", and use the skills of an adjuster to negotiate and bring the file to a resolution. The effective adjuster knows when to fight a battle, and when to concede.

(8) Don't burn your bridges - An effective adjuster is reasonable and fair in dealing with others, not stubborn and unyeilding. An effective adjuster knows that being reasonable and fair will make the job easier, but they al


Occupational Outlook Handbook

Provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

CADO Admin

Description:  for Claims Adjusters, Appraisers, Examiners, and Investigators

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor
The following is a TOC to the information provided in this online handbook.

Article info Updated 10/15/2020

 


Seven Newbie Questions

CADO Admin

Subject: Seven Newbie Questions
Description: Forum Past By Alex

 OK. Here I am. Just got my Georgia license (god, what a drag that was!) and ready to make millions   I've been in construcion for a few years (roofing estimator)  and dealt a lot with claim based construction work.  So, I just wanted to hear some advise from you guys, hardened in battles veterans....

 
So, here we go.
 
  1. How do I get in? What should my strategy be? Should I try to get hired by a large insurance company to gain some experience? State Farm? Allstate? Or should I just get on the rosters of as many independents as possible and wait for a lucky day?
  2. What are the advantages and disadvantages of being a staff adjuster vs independent?
  3. Is there enough work right now? I hear a lot of older guys are leaving the field. Does that mean, it would be easier for me to find work?
  4. How much you all guys make? Honestly, is it worth doing what you are doing?  How much a typical staff adjuster makes? Independent? In storm situation? In  a slow year?  In an average year?
  5. What is better residential or commercial claims? How can I get to work commercial claims?
  6. Flood and earthquake certifications?  Do I need them? Are they beneficial to me at this stage?
  7. How many licenses should I get? In which states?

RESUME WRITING | How to write a masterpiece of a resume

CADO Admin
Subject: RESUME WRITING | How to write a masterpiece of a resume
Description

Comments from the site;

"Resume writing: How to write a resume that generates results. Free award-winning online guide to resume writing. Resume examples - resume format choices - samples of good writing. You can write a resume as well as a top-level professional writer."


URL: http://www.rockportinstitute.com/resumes.html

Resumes: The Harsh Truth

CADO Admin
Subject: Resumes: The Harsh Truth
Description

I generally lurk in the shadows on this site. I am posting without my name or company name as I am a principal with a nationwide cat company and prefer the security of anonymity for this particular posting. Not one of the biggest vendors but, in my opinion, one of the best. I am writing to hopefully shed some light on this subject of resumes and how to break into the "bidness".

We receive a lot (A LOT) of unsolicited resumes. I am the one who sifts through them and files them accordingly. To streamline the process I have three doors for these resumes.

Door Number One: Former contractors, former auto sales/body repair people, former real estate appraisers, former insurance agents, and former anything that is not related to insurance adjusting. This door is for the folks who have no experience in adjusting a claim and who prefer to explain to me how their unrelated skills can quickly be converted to the claims field. This door is for them folks that couldn't make it in their chosen field. Sorry, but that's reality.

Door Number Two: High school and college graduates with a limited understanding of the King's English or basic grammar structure. "I looking for a position with you company." Also, the ones who hide their lack of communication skills with $67 words that I have to go look up in the dictionary. I'm not wasting my time doing that. Believe me, I know why you're sending me a resume. If you prefer to waste your time with unsolicited resumes, at least keep it simple, to the point, and with Standard English construction.

Door Number Three: These are the folks who enjoy listing all the other vendors they've worked with since 1957. Of course, they fail to realize that all these vendors are also my competitors. Let's say that ABC Adjusting is my biggest competition in the Texas market and I know in my heart that the adjusters they use put out an inferior product. How do I know this? Because I know we put out a superior product. When I get a resume from an adjuster who has plenty of experience in the claim industry but 80% of that experience is with ABC Adjusting then, in my mind, this is an ABC adjuster and will always be an ABC adjuster. I'm also suspicious. Why is he coming to me now? Did he have a falling out with ABC? Did they run him off or did this adjuster become dissatisfied with them? These are questions you do not want raised in my mind if you are serious about getting on our list.

Here are the lessons you need to learn from my experiences.

First, if you are serious about getting out on a storm then get out to the storm. If you have claims experience, then find where the vendor has his storm office and go talk to someone face to face. Bring a copy of some estimates you have written in the past (oh, and that resume, if you insist). When all of our regular adjusters are working and I'm casting about for extra help, if you are standing there, ready to go to work, then chances are good that are I'll give you a shot rather than looking up someone in the resume file. Don't count on unsolicited resumes, unless you just enjoy typing up your accomplishments. They are not productive in this industry and, in my personal opinion, are a waste of time. In other industries (sales, marketing, manufacturing, etc.) they are the way to go, but not for this business that we have chosen. I cannot remember the last time I called someone to work a storm just from a resume. It doesn't happen.

Second, if you have no claims experience then the best way to get out on a storm is to get out to the storm. Find an adjuster who will be working and make some type of arrangement for assistance services.


Staff Adjuster Looking to go Independent

Anonym

Hello Everyone,

I have viewed these forums for years and am finally writing my first post. I have read through questions about staff adjusters vs. I/A's, and have found both to be informative. I realize that many of you have questions about becoming a staff adjuster - so please don't be afraid to ask me any questions you may have. I have 10 years of experience with 3 different major insurance companies. I have worked auto and property, but for the majority of my career I have focused on property. I've handled everything from fires to wind and hail to hurricanes and collapse claims. I definitely have received my fair share of experience as a staff adjuster and I get paid fairly well. I am not complaining - I started at $26k a year and am now making $65k before a non-guaranteed bonus of up to 10%. This of course is all gross and before health care and retirement benefits come out.

As far as pay goes, I am content. I am doing well, I feel, but understand that I/A's have the possibility of making quite a bit more, just not guaranteed. Also, I understand the expenses related to being independent, so I realize the I/A's potential for earnings is diminished after subtracting vehicle, lodging, license, Xactimate, etc. expenses from what they bring home. Ultimately, I am looking for the freedom that I hear about all the time. I literally have worked 80+ hours a week several times this year - I'm burnt out a bit, and it has been slow! It's just all the admin stuff, supplements, PA's, holding the insured's hand - which I am okay with, but it wears you down after so long. I'm looking at having an incentive to put in as many hours as I do. 

What I really want to know is this: Is it plausible to make a bit more take home pay (net) than I make now? Does it make sense to focus on State Farm or USAA certification? Anything else I should be considering?

I've read through these posts several times and have found there is a perceived animosity from staff guys for independents, but I have never seen that. I think that might be a sentiment from 20-30 years ago, because there are some old timers, especially higher ups in management, who tend to have those ideas. Most staff I know wish they could be independent, it is just such a risk to step out and take the leap.

Thanks you all - be safe out there!


Ray's Book

Anonym

Hi All,

I am a new adjuster and after having read through numerous posts for beginners, I noticed Ray Hall kept making an offer that no one took him up on and also mentioned he was writing a book about adjusting. As he passed away before I got into this industry and had an opportunity to take him up on his offer, I was curious if anyone knows if he actually finished his book and how I might be able to get a copy of it.

 Thanks.


Question: OJT

Anonym
Question received from a visitor via support@catadjuster.org;

 

I have been trying to get into the CAT adjuster industry for a while. My concern was to pay for all the training and then come home and no work.Is it at all possible to go OJT with all these storms then get license later?


Hurricane Sandy

Anonym

What's your action plan?

I haven't seen anybody posting who they're on stand-by with.  I'm looking for 1st time deployment, anybody care to share any insight?

Thanks, and stay safe.


Have license...How do I get hired?

Anonym
I took and passed the exam for becoming an adjuster last year. I do not have any experience in the insurance industry however and I am finding it hard to even get into it. Any advice?

Need help getting started as a CAT adjuster

Anonym

 I am interested in becoming a CAT adjuster and need some pointers.  First off from reading the posts on this website it seems that attending an actual classroom is no better than just doing it online at home.  I want to get off on the right foot and make myself stand out so I can be successful. 

Once I have done the training and receive my license what is the best avenue to take getting in as an independent adjuster with a company? As an IA do you have to get your own hazard insurance to protect you while on the properties your adjusting?

Having no experience in adjusting, any comments or suggested paths for training and employment would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

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