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Last Post 07/21/2009 10:52 PM by  BobH
Join ARISE Association for Roof Inspection Safety Empowerment
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Catsvstrained
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06/19/2009 8:59 AM
     
    Wanted to let everyone know about ARISE, a new association / professional informational sharing group forming that all Property Claims Adjusters should be a part of. Our job success depends on the quality of our work product. Almost all storm claims involves risk, few of which are as great as the task of roof inspection. Our employers tell us that we should not climb any roof that we are not comfortable with but we all know that we cannot get paid for the claims we do not complete. This is just one of many mindsets that puts us at risk when we push ourselves to deliver scope from roof systems that we are not equipped to handle. The Roof Inspection Trades industry as a whole is poorly advised on the subject of incident data and emerging products that could significantly decrease our occupational risks. IT IS TIME FOR THIS TO CHANGE!

    This association is currently working with OSHA to establish an  Alliance program that provides assistance for professional groups that are not safety regulated by the Dept. of Labor. Membership is free of charge and can be obtained by visiting their website @
     
    www.arise2009.homestead.com


    WHY ARISE?
    1) Hundreds (far too many) of Roofing Inspection Trades professionals experience significant injuries every year with
       consequences that range anywhere from temporary loss of revenue to career ending injuries and even loss of life.

    2) The review of available roof inspection incident reports indicate numerous repetitive commonalities with respect to the
        primary causes of injury producing occurrences. Many seasoned RIT professionals have cultivated safety / survival skills
        and understanding throughout their career with information generated from experience, close calls, mistakes and their
        own accidents. This trial and error on an individual level is the primary process that the industry currently utilizes to
        facilitate safety. Organized informational intervention is the very first step towards breaking industry trends that merely
        perpetuate preventable risk.

    3) Our Industry is not regulated by The United States Department of Labor / Occupational Safety & Health Administration,
       under "Fall Protection" Regulations, as subpart M 1926.500 (a) (1)  stipulates "the provisions of this subpart do not apply
       when employees are making an inspection, investigation, or assessment of workplace conditions prior to the actual start
        of construction work or after all construction work has been completed." AS MEMBERS OF THE ROOFING INSPECTION INDUSTRY, WE MUST TAKE RESPONSIBILLITY FOR OUR OWN SAFETY.
       TRADES INDUSTRY, WE MUST BE ACCOUNTABLE FOR OUR OWN SAFETY!
    CatSvs Trained
    Catsvstrained
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    06/21/2009 8:18 AM
    Some Additional Information:

    Q - WHY ARISE?

     

    1) Hundreds (far too many) of Roofing Inspection Trades professionals experience significant injuries every year with consequences that range anywhere from temporary loss of revenue to career ending injuries and even loss of life.

     

    2) The review of available roof inspection incident reports indicate numerous repetitive commonalities with respect to the primary causes of injury producing occurrences. Many seasoned RIT professionals have cultivated safety / survival skills and understanding throughout their career with information generated from experience, close calls, mistakes and their own accidents. This trial and error on an individual level is the primary process that the industry currently utilizes to provide safety. Organized informational intervention is the very first step towards breaking industry trends that merely perpetuate preventable risk.

     

    3) Our Industry is not regulated by The United States Department of Labor / Occupational Safety & Health Administration, under "Fall Protection" Regulations, as subpart M 1926.500 (a) (1)  stipulates "the provisions of this subpart do not apply when employees are making an inspection, investigation, or assessment of workplace conditions prior to the actual start

    of construction work or after all construction work has been completed." AS MEMBERS OF THE ROOFING INSPECTION INDUSTRY, WE MUST TAKE RESPONSIBILLITY FOR OUR OWN SAFETY.

     

    Q – Is this association legitimate?

    This association is new but never-the-less very legitimate.  Like many other professional groups, ARISE is now and will always be owned and operated by its members. Our founders  are currently working with OSHA to build an "Alliance Program" - an OSHA assistance program offered by the US dept. of labor. Assistance with starting this program require that our information is:

    1) Not sponsored by any business interest.

    2) Free and accessible for all RIT professionals to learn from.

    Therefore, (at least for now) ARISE will have to rest on the backs of those kind enough to give back to the industry that they make a living from.

    Q – Statistical data and injury reports are already available on industrial work related accidents so why would we need to join an association to learn about how to avoid them?

    Yes,  industrial incident and safety statistical data is available, it just isn't applicable to the uniqueness of our industry. Some accident report on roof falls can be obtained however 95% of them involve a homeowner's mistake and once again that does not quite fit the venue of risk that we as claims adjusters experience.

    The US Dept Of Labor exception 1926.500 excludes 60,000+ claims adjusters and ???? other rfg inspection trades professionals from the regulations of fall protection. How is it that our profession is any less dangerous than any other industry that puts workers on top of things not designed for the human foot?

     ARISE is ONLY about providing individuals and their employers with information on how to adequately provide for their own safety.

    Q – The country is full of industrial training companies so why do we need to establish or refine our own standards for roof inspection safety?

    Industrial training companies are not the answer to improving the safety of our industry as it is primarily their equipment and techniques (not the rock climbing industries) that are simply not compatible with roof inspection. (examples: adjusters cannot nail anchors to roofs, full body harnesses that attach to safety lines at mid chest do not allow for hands free activity on inclined surfaces, there is no practical roof inspection application for retractable lanyards, no overhead scaffolding to clip on to, etc, etc, etc). The climbing industry is a different story, in fact all OSHA compliant roof inspection process and gear is applicable to (at least some form of) the climbing industry. However, NOT all climbing industry gear and process can be considered applicable to the roof inspection industry. Please understand that this info is not based on the school of "because I said so". This comes from a very detailed OSHA & ANSI compliant group of individuals that make up ACCT (The Assoc of Challenge Course Technology) they are responsible for setting, maintaining and modifying safety standards for those who climb up and do things on various shaped, (is this starting to sound familiar?) high, inclined/pitched elements, all of which require a 5k tensile strength safety line/system.

    Significant decrease in our industries risk exposure depends on the establishment of professional consensus:

    EXAMPLE: According to my calculations, there are currently five different R&H classes being taught to adjusters based on four different schools of thought. Our risks as adjusters, though somewhat similar to other industries is never-the-less unique and should be addressed as such. This is the exact same approach that has proven so successful for ACCT. Thirty years ago the team/challenge/ropes course industry developed safety process, equipment and technique based on many different schools of thought. People were hurt from this diversity as some felt it was ok to use a laundry basket pulley on their zip lines, others had no idea that dynamic rope could fail to prevent an injury at heights of less than 12 ft OR that static rope could produce 1200lbs of shock with falls of less than 6ft. Incidents of deaths and other injuries were at unacceptable levels. ACCT has changed all that by replacing the mindset  of "I am correct because I said so" with the mindset of "We are the most correct because our information is the most factual to date based on industry consensus". Insurance Underwriters now / today rate the threat of injury for team course activity at less than that of the sport of Billiards.

    The Insurance Industry is experiencing this same kind of chaos today. Many and quite possibly most actively deployed R&H adjusters out their have no idea if they are using a dynamic, low stretch or static rope, all that they know is that it is a black or a blue rope that they bought at Home Depot and that this was all that they needed to convince their employer that they were qualified for the job.

    CatSvs Trained
    Snappy
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    06/21/2009 9:49 PM

    Is it the position of ARISE that

    all adjusters should be required

    by OSHA to be roped up whenever

    they are on any roof?

     

    And if not please be specific  about

    what regulations you would like

    to see OSHA implement. We have

    plenty of space here and many of

    us like to read.

     

    Thank you.

     

    Guy Snappy

    Catsvstrained
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    06/22/2009 7:42 AM
    Good Question Snappy and No it is not the position of ARISE that OSHA implements any regulation on our industry. In fact OSHA alliance programs do NOT include an enforcement component. An OSHA alliance is simply a two year assistance program offered by the dept of labor to promote a national workplace dialogue on safety issues, as well as to provide for education, training, outreach and communication. Much more can be learned about OSHA alliance programs @ http://www.osha.gov/dcsp/alliances/whatis.html
    CatSvs Trained
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    06/22/2009 3:22 PM

    I think roof safety is the soft underbelly of the adjusting industry.

    And it all seems to hinge on OSHA's:

     

    "Fall Protection" Regulations, as subpart M 1926.500 (a) (1).

     

    If the exemption were eliminated or severely modified

    what would happen?

     

    Would all roof inspectors have to  safety-up  like roofers?

     

    And if there was regulation where would the liability fall:

    adjuster, IA firm, or carrier? Some combination?

     

    What effect on the industry?

     

    Policy premiums would have to be much higher if

    cat claims had to be handled at the same speed

    yet adjusters roped-up so as to not possibly fall more

    than 6 feet.

     

    What a mare's nest.

     

    I'm not supporting ARISE

    or get together's with OSHA

    or additional regulations.

     

    Just wondering out loud.

    Walking my brain.

     

    Snappy

     

    Drink up Shriners.

    BobH
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    06/23/2009 1:20 AM
    Posted By Snappy on 22 Jun 2009 03:22 PM

     

    Would all roof inspectors have to  safety-up  like roofers?

     

    I just wrapped up a field assignment where there were lots of roofs being replaced when you drive around, and I never saw one of the roofers using safety equipment.  (unless OSHA certifies the foam rubber cushion some of them hold on to...)  I was roped up on a 2 story, and across the street a similar house was getting a new roof.  How those guys walk around on a slick deck is beyond me.

    Some laws don't get enforced, but when people fall then the "investigation" will find what it finds.  Accidents do happen.  One of the roof salesman I met at an inspection 3 weeks ago was telling me about a fatality involving a laborer on a roof he had sold.
     
    I roped up when needed, and thanks to Kevin's class had a pretty good idea of what I was doing.
     
    One of the independent adjusters working out of an office 30 miles south of me in the Atlanta area fell and broke his femur pretty seriously about a month ago.  I don't know his name, but I know from 3 reliable sources that the incident happened.  He was not roped up, was walking along a ridge, and the poor condition roof had a shingle pull out from under him.  Could have happened to me countless times in past years.
     
    Laws. supposed to's, all of that is just words.  We simply need to be safe out there, and there are some roofs that need to be roped up.  Like seeing if it's raining outside, or if you need a jacket.  It is a tool to be used when needed, like that big hammer in the shop.  You reach for it when it's needed, and you will know when it is needed.


     
    Bob H
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    06/23/2009 2:49 PM
    Bob Harvey on roof 0
     
    Rope is tied off to Brick column in front, there is a photo of that on the next page.
     
    Bob Harvey on roof 1
     
    Rope is going through a Petzl Gri-Gri that is attached to Harness by Black Diamond (model: Momentum AL)
     
    Bob Harvey on roof 2
     
    Bob Harvey on roof 3
     
    Rope is going through a Petzl Gri-Gri that is attached to Harness with Caribiner.  
    Those shingles marked with chalk under my right foot were pulled loose from wind, stapled on top of another layer of roofing.  Even if it was half the pitch, this is a dangerous roof not to be roped off.  Lot's of blown off tabs above the dormer that you don't see in this photo, and I would have missed from the eve on a ladder if I didn't go up the roof.
    Bob H
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    06/24/2009 12:18 AM
    Looks like the gettin' there and back down was the hardest part.  Little tricky on the navigation too, but the main roof isn't too bad once you got up there.  Had several in the past, and didn't think much of them until it came time to come back down.  Ouch.  
    okclarryd
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    06/24/2009 9:51 PM
    I am so glad y'all are doin' all them roofs in Plano or Richardson 'cause then I don't have to.

    I have had a couple of little issues health wise and I'm done with roofs unless they are 4/12 or less. And then only if I'm in the mood.

    I'm trying to become the grumpy guy in the office that reviews your files. You know, the Stupidvisor or Mangler. That's who I wanna be when I grow up.
    Larry D Hardin
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    06/25/2009 9:33 AM

    BobH --

    Good pictures.

    Was that a 1 or 2 man operation?

    One rope or two?

    If 1 man what did you anchor to?

    And anchored both ends or not?

    Any damage to roof ridge area by rope?

    Thanks.

     

    Snappy

     

    Drink up Shriners.

    BobH
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    06/25/2009 12:21 PM
    Was that a 1 or 2 man operation?
     
    2 man team. I was very fortunate to be teamed up with Tony Trujillo, who helped me more than I can say.
     
     
     
    Tony with Ascender 
     
    Here you can see Tony using an Ascender made by Petzl, attached to a harness made by Black Diamond.
    One rope or two?
     
    One rope.  I have several climbing ropes in 160' lengths but only used one at a time.  Kevin's post at the top of this thread mentions "dynamic" vs "static" rope, and those are some of the terms you bump into as you learn about this subject. I use 11mm (7/16) Static rope.
     
    If 1 man what did you anchor to?
     
    Even with 2 people we preferred to anchor to fixed objects (no shortage of trees in Georgia).

    Tied to tree

    This is what the "other side of the rope" was tied to in the last photo of the previous page.

    You will notice in the first photo there was a brick pillar near the street, and the other end of the rope was tied to that:

    Tied to brick pillar

    Necessity is the mother of invention, and most of the time you will spot a 4x4 deck post, a porch with various anchor possibilities, or a very substantial hedge-bush that you can wrap your webbing around the base a few times then tie the rope off to that.
     
    If you are on a really cut-up roof with faces going off in all directions that is where the ground person comes in very handy, moving as needed. 
     
    And anchored both ends or not?
     
    Yes, both ends anchored. I would often create about 20' of slack so I could move around the roof faces easily.  When you get to the ridge you pull up the slack before going to the other side.
     
    Any damage to roof ridge area by rope?
     
    Some small amount of granule loss will occur by simply pulling the rope over the ridge.  There are a variety of ways to do the inspection, and if the rope is going to be moving back and forth (not tied to a tree) you do need to take precautions not to cause more damage to the ridge. Kevin teaches techniques for that in his class.
     
    I am just a 53 year old guy trying to keep my ass off the dirt, and don't consider myself an expert at this. I am very grateful to Kevin Kramer for having the Juevos to teach a class on Rope & Harness.  At the time it was K-Squared Cat Svs.  He recently changed the name to Catastrophe Career Specialties LLC (top of this thread).
     
    Another person I respect in this area is Chuck Deaton, who posted on this forum many years ago about using an ascender, and rope for roof inspections. He opened my eyes to the obvious solution if you don't want to take an unintended roller-coaster ride down to the ground.
    Bob H
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    06/25/2009 1:14 PM
    If I was 53 I would take a course like this THIS WEEK and I take it from Kevin. Oops, forgot one thing you need a burb or a PU and a two story ladder, I.m sorry two things. do not go out of town on storms any longer.. Sorry, third thing-"do not work roof claims on Homeowners any longer.
    BobH
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    06/25/2009 2:35 PM
    Posted By Ray Hall on 25 Jun 2009 01:14 PM
    ...and a two story ladder.
    Yeah, doing double-pulls is not allways going to work out on every roof configuration.  Sometimes there is no 1st story access, or the angles aren't favorable to place the ladder on the slope below.
    32 foot ladder
     
    Here you can see a 32 footer fully extended, which I preferred to using the wood deck to right (no traction but could have tied the ladder to side rails).
     
    I was roped-off when climbing the ladder, so even if I slipped I wouldn't get to the ground.
     
    This ladder is small compared to one of Kevin's, he has a 40 footer.


    Bob H
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    06/26/2009 1:23 AM

    BobH --

     

    Thanks for the details on your pictures.

     

    What would you think of the following system:

    1 man

    1 rope

    secured at both ends

    anchored  to:   3 or 4  55# dumb bells  (each side)

     

    Alpine butterfly loops tied  every 3 feet

    (The butterfly loop can take a load in either

      direction and from the loop itself.)

     

    1 harness

    2  lanyards

    (both lanyards clipped into the harness)

     

    At least one lanyard would always be clipped into

    one of the butterfly loops.

     

    Roped in:

    up the ladder

    on both sides

    down the ladder.

     

    You could leave slack for lateral movement

    and take up slack with a carabiner

    between adjacent or non adjacent loops.

     

    Since you would never fall or slide more than

    four or five feet before "being arrested"  the

    anchorage would not need to be more than the

    weight of the climber. Rope friction would in

    effect add "weight" to the anchorage.

     

    Hooking in to butterfly loops

    eliminates the possibility of

    rope grips, ascenders, or whatever mechanical device

    not holding (failing)  if turned upside down.

    From what I understand only the

    prussic knot always works bi-directionally.

     

    The Alpine butterfly loops would hold if you

    were standing on the ridge and fell to either

    side -- even better than a prussic knot.

     

    Snappy

     

    Drink up Shriners, always.

    BobH
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    06/26/2009 12:25 PM
    There are several members of this forum who have much more experience with Rope & Harness than I do.  Perhaps they will weigh in.
     
    1 rope secured at both ends anchored  to:   3 or 4  55# dumb bells  (each side)
     
    I have done something like that with several 5 gallon water jugs held together with webbing.  That would be a last resort, if there wasn't something else to tie off to.  Even a common fence will work to tie off, you just find a gap between a 4x4 and the fence boards and pull the webbing around the 4x4 a few times.
     
    I do not like the angle of the rope when simply attached to a weight.  It pulls straight down and is not kind to gutters.  If there is no gutter, it will cut through the butt end of shingle until the rope hits the fascia.  The guy who started this thread, Kevin, has a very good solution to a portable weight device but I won't steal his thunder.
     
    Alpine butterfly loops tied  every 3 feet (The butterfly loop can take a load in either  direction and from the loop itself.)  ...2  lanyards ...(both lanyards clipped into the harness).  ...At least one lanyard would always be clipped into one of the butterfly loops.
     
    I suppose you could give it a try, see if it works for you. 
     
    I have worked with 3 different devices that slide up & down the full length of rope.  Some are better for ascending, some better for descending, but all of them are rated at a strength 10x my weight and are bullet proof.  Loops tied every 3 feet would frustrate me.  Taking the time to hook into them, and unhook from the one further down the roof from where I was at would be maddening. 
     
    How would you get the thing over the roof?  The knots every 3' would have to be tied before the rope was placed on the roof.  As a practical matter, you do NOT want to pull knotted rope over a ridge - even with a single knot tied to a messenger line I have broken off ridge cap before when pulling the rope over.  You think it just needs a little stronger tug...  there goes the ridge cap.
     
    Kevin Kramer designed a "friction reducing device" that you can see if you visit his web site. I used it at his class, and it worked well.  He wasn't selling them at the time, so I made one.  Now he is selling them - and I just have to say from speaking with him,  I don't think he plans to make much money selling the hardware he offers on his site.  It is more of a service he provides, sharing the products that are field-tested.
     
    From my limited experience, the Petzl ascender is the easiest way to get up the roof, and can be used to secure you for roof inspection as you move laterally.  It does not work well going down (has "teeth" that grab the rope and is intended as a one-way device). 
     
    There are rope-grabs made by Gibbs, Petzl, and others, that are very similar to the ascender but they use a ribbed cam to force the rope to only move one direction.  Lacking the sharp teeth of the ascender, it can be used (with care) to descend the roof.  If you let go, or fall, it will halt your descent immediately.  it is a rope-grab.
     
    3rd, there is the Petzl Gri-Gri which I will comment on in a subsequent post.  It has been around for a long time (over 10 years) and is my weapon of choice when on a steep roof because the descent is much more controlled.  the device has markings stamped in the metal saying it is to be used with rope no smaller that 10 mm and no larger than 11 mm.  I use static 11mm climbing rope that is very stiff, and it is a bit of a chore pulling it through the Gri-Gri during ascent.  It can be done, but typically I use the Petzl ascender to gradually make my way up to the first ridge.  At that point I will sit on the ridge, make sure I am at a stable place, and switch over to the Gri-Gri for the rest of my journey down the other side, or maneuvering around.
     
    I am familiar with the butterfly loop you mention, and have been prepared to tie a single butterfly loop at the top of the ridge in order to have a secure place to tie a 2nd rope that I bring up on a back-pack for access to hips or cut up faces on the sides.  I never had to do that because I had an assistant who could position ropes for me, but that is a good knot to know and be able to use when needed.
     
     
    Bob H
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    06/26/2009 1:16 PM
    (continued from last post) One of the best descriptions I have read about the Petzl Gri-Gri is a 9 year old post in the CADO forum archives  http://www.catadjuster.org/discus/m...3/340.html (April 24, 2000 - 12:50 am post by storm pro).
     
    That thread has a good safety post by RD Hood who remains active on this forum, along with posts by Chuck Deaton.
     
    I ran across Dave Hood's post when I was trying to figure out how to get a rope over the roof of a very large mansion.  His idea of a fishing rod with 4 oz weight really worked for me.  Anything lighter than 4 oz would "sit there" on the other side of the ridge, or hang from a 2 story gutter on the other side.  At 4 oz, it keeps on falling til it pulls the heavy fishing line down to the dirt on the other side.  I found a 4 oz heavy rubber ball (size of tennis ball but solid) that will "bounce" if it doesn't quite clear the slope on the other side of the ridge, and pull the heavy duty fishing line all the way down to the ground where you can attach it to your climbing rope.
     
    That thread mentions an adjuster named Glen Garoutte and if you put his name in the search box of this forum you will see some posts he made as an adjuster - then there are posts where they are collecting funds for his family after he falls off a roof to his death.
     
    This will always be a serious topic, I just learned yesterday of an adjuster in Oklahoma who fell and broke his ankle.  My intent in posting this stuff is similar to Kevin's - try to prevent accidents. 
     
    When I bought my climbing gear a few years ago at a retail store, I told the salesman (who was a climber) that they were crazy to hang off a rock at Yosemite hundreds of feet in the air.  I will never forget his response.  He said "you can be as safe as you want to be".  You can anchor in to a single point of attachment in the rock, or you can have 3 of them.  You can choose to wear a helmet, or not.  You can spend some time practicing the knots and be confident about your skills.
     
     
    Bob H
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    06/27/2009 10:32 AM
    I use a Zebco spin cast fishing rod with a super ball in a net bag (think grapes). Just get a clear shot and cast the super ball over the ridge and down the other slope. Then attach a tied off rope and reel the rope over to you and tie rope off.
    "Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
    Catsvstrained
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    06/28/2009 6:01 AM

    Thanks Bob for the kind words, looks like you are putting your R&H training to good use. GREAT Pics!

    What a great series of posts that starts out w/ me introducing ARISE,Snappy first questioning it then shooting it down and THENNNN wanting Bob to provide him with all the safety information that ARISE is trying to coordinate and distribute to all adjusters. Hmmmmmmm
     
    Don't worry Snappy, ARISE will provide you with safety information about your roof inspections even w/o your membership or support.
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    06/28/2009 6:16 AM
    CatSvs Trained
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    06/28/2009 6:19 AM
    This is a LL II Line Launcher that can place "Slick Line" over a four story Bld. Very effective, extremely accurate with padded projectile.
    CatSvs Trained
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    06/28/2009 6:22 AM
    CatSvs Trained
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    06/28/2009 6:26 AM
    This is a weighted tennis ball attached to a bungee cord w/ a 45ft vertical capabillity. Also very effective, not quite as accurate or as loud as LL II.
    CatSvs Trained
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    06/28/2009 8:07 PM
    Posted By Catsvstrained on 28 Jun 2009 06:19 AM
    This is a LL II Line Launcher that can place "Slick Line" over a four story Bld. Very effective, extremely accurate with padded projectile.
    Wow - I would imagine you have to make certain your line is not going to get tangled up when you shoot that 22 caliber charge on the launcher.
    Bob H
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    06/29/2009 12:41 AM

    Keven -- Nobody's trying to get any of your  information for free.

    I asked BobH some questions about the pictures he posted. He

    answered them.

     

    But  I will ask you this, is there a good 1 man, 1 rope, portable anchor,

    roping-up system, in your opinion? Or must it be a 2 man team effort

    to be safe.

     

    Snappy

     

    Drink up Shriners.

     

    Catsvstrained
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    06/29/2009 9:02 AM
     
    Slick line is an arborist line that is tangle free if you handle it appropriately. Its exterior is kind of waxy (1.8mm) and I store it simply laid on top of itself in a milk crate (has the ability to twist real bad if wrapped around anything), line will all fly out of crate w/o tangles when shot over roof.
     
       Yes Snappy there is an outstanding one man "roping-up" system which is called a "Static" belay system that most people who I train prefer greatly over a "Two Person" belay team. Static belays are normally set up using one rope anchored on both sides of bld and  incorporate portable anchors on homes w/ no natural anchors.
     
    Belay - A climbing term meaning to make secure at the end of a rope.
     
    The Two Person roof inspection Belay system is the only process that State Farm trains their employees on as it is based on their original training program developed twenty years ago and never changed or modified which is a shame because many new products have been developed since that time.
     
    In my opinion, One-man Static belays are more efficient and involve less risk than two-man teams because they require less equipment which translates less potential for equipment failure AND less potential for mis-communication between climber and ground belay person.
     
    This is the fundamental difference between my R&H program and the R&H programs at State Farm, Pilot, US Staffing, ERT etc... Their programs were dead from the moment that they implemented them while mine continuously evolves with OSHA, ANSI & ACCT compliance modifications, information that is gathered and evaluated on roof inspection accident reports, changes in the storm claims industry, research and testing of emerging products...  Bob took my class several months ago and already several changes have been implemented like:
     
    New line placement devices
    &
    The way that static ropes, low stretch ropes & dynamic ropes are defined.   Just to name a few
    CatSvs Trained
    Topic is locked
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