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Last Post 12/18/2013 4:58 PM by  AcceleratedAdjuster
Adjuster License types in Texas - advice neeed!
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chrismahoney
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07/16/2008 11:26 AM

    Howdy folks. I've been lurking on this site for awhile... thinking about becoming an adjuster. I'm in the insurance business (sales) right now and have been for 15 years...  getting burned out big time. Also have a residential home construction background before that. When it comes to getting an adjuster license in Texas, it seems there are 2 or 3 different kinds - there's one for workers' comp, one for "all lines", and there's even one that's a "public" adjuster license. What the heck is a "public adjuster"? I think there is also one that is for property, but doesn't include other stuff - I THINK.

    Anyway, what is the license to get if you want to be able to do everything except workers' comp adjusting? I don't want to get the wrong license because of my own ignorance.

    Okay, here is the really big question. Is it practical to think a guy like me could get licensed and find an adjusting firm to let me "wade" into it by doing some day claims here and there to get experience and knowledge? I would love to go out and adjust claims on Saturdays, and I could probably squeeze in a day duting the week if necessary. I'm pretty sure the more tenured and experienced guys would be the regular day claim adjusters during non-disastrous times, and that there are still plenty of guys like that with little work to do if they aren't working cat claims somewhere. Right? Wrong? Maybe?

    Thanks. I love this forum!

     

     

     

    Tags: Licensing
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    BobH
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    07/16/2008 12:17 PM

    Get the "all lines" one. Work Comp is part of the training and on the the exam, but nonetheless that is the license most people get.

    I would love to go out and adjust claims on Saturdays, and I could probably squeeze in a day during the week if necessary.

    Assuming your are talking about working in your home town (part time) and sleeping in your own bed, I don't think you are going to find a gig like that.

    The majority of day claims I get are where a pipe burst (etc.) and they kind of need some one out there "yesterday" because by the time the Insured called it in, the agent reported it, the claims department digested it, and someone assigned it out, and then an individual adjuster is assigned, the homeowner already has the opinion that "you" are slow and late when you make that first phone call.

    I am pretty willing to hit the road to look at damaged property every day of the week.

    Bob H
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    Ray Hall
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    07/16/2008 3:55 PM

    On the wade in topic to work claims on weekends, the odds are really against you. The local IA firms in large and small cities have worked very had to establish their reputation and received new assignments.  They probably would not hire you unless you had 5 or more years of experience as a staff adjuster and left on good terms.

    When a large storm hits, you MAY find an adjuster who can not climb roofs any longer that needs a helper that can. Do that one year and you can go on your own the second year. if you are a very quick study.

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    chrismahoney
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    07/16/2008 4:33 PM

    Hey you guys - thanks for the input and advice. Let me ask the "wade in" scenarion question a different way: I am able to, any day of the week, at any time of the day, take a phone call that instructs me to go over to 1234 Anystreet (somewhere locally) and adjust that roof claim or flooded first floor caused by that broken water heater. I am totally flexible, just can't drop everything and go to MS or FL for 3 months or devote 40 or more hours a week to it right now even if it was available. (right now, but one day in 6 months or a year, probably). So, given that scenario, being available 24 hrs a day, anyday, could I get one claim a week to do in the local area?

    I don't mean to sound like a stubborn ass, because you probably answered the question for me already, but I'm pretty persistent and may need to be hit over the head with it. Maybe I can find someone in the business that I already have a relationship with - like a general agency that assigns claims out to independents, that will give me a shot. There are a bajillion homes here in the DFW area. A lot of these homes are insured by excess and surplus lines companies (through Managing General Agencies) that are using independent adjusting firms. Why can't I pick up a claim or two?  Sounds scarry, but I think I could manage it. I know I have a lot to learn but I'm pretty intelligent (if I don't mind saying so myself!) Sorry, don't mean to sound cocky - but if you're my age (48), got kids in college and going broke, you're VERY MOTIVATED and DETERMINED. It's like when you go back to college when you're "older" and make straight "A's" because you have little time, but lots of desire and motivation, and you're MATURE. Compared to being younger, having lots of time but little motivation and drive, not knowing what you want, and being immature.

    Okay, hit me over the head with it - is there any hope for me on this idea? Give me all you got - I can handle it! Okay, I lied, I turned 49 today. 

    Any of you Texas adjusters out there in my area need a p/t helper? I'll work cheap!

     

      

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    BobH
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    07/16/2008 4:45 PM
    Gotcha on all of that. You have much more insurance background than most people starting out - but with that said, I would consider finding an IA to work under rather than becoming "your own adjusting company" overnight.

    Maybe you would do fine, but for the initial phase it really helps to have another set of eyes looking over your work. Dunno if you have any idea of what captions you would put in your preliminary report, for RISK, ORIGIN OF LOSS, CLAIM & ADJUSTMENT, SUBROGATION, etc.
    Bob H
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    Ray Hall
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    07/16/2008 7:02 PM

    Why would any IA in DFW want to put a part time person on , who has never worked a claim of any kind ? Answer 100 or more people are looking for the same job and have from 5 years to 30 years of experience with a carrier or combined experience. MGA's are a good source of business as they have a lot to do with recommending a good IA FIRM. Not a wantabee. Just get on phone and call ever IA in the adjusters section and you will start your own education program and save a lot of gasoline.   Or call me sometime I started over 50 years ago and worked ever type claim, except aircraft, bloodstock and blue water marine.

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    BobH
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    07/16/2008 7:12 PM
    Why would any IA in DFW want to put a part time person on , who has never worked a claim of any kind ?

    Strange things happen if you have the right connections. I was hired on by an IA over 18 years ago because I knew the manager for 10 years before then, and he had mercy on me and figured I would learn.

    Chris may shock us all by "getting in" because of his connections, or getting an MGA to tell a local IA something good about him, and infer they will transfer their claims to that office...  he may bring things to the table that most new guys don't.

    Bob H
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    chrismahoney
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    07/16/2008 10:54 PM

    Bob and Ray, I appreciate you guys shootin' straight with me. Granted, I have a  lot to learn even if I know a little, and the odds are against me. I have a lot of respect for your profession, your opinions, and the years of experience and thousands of claims it takes to get the real "know how" you need to be a good adjuster. I'll remember the advice as I pursue. I hope I get lucky and find the right gig to get some experience. Thanks!... Chris

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    HuskerCat
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    07/17/2008 2:03 AM

    Hey, Chris.....you obviously should have some good coverage knowledge (or the ability to do so) after 15 years in sales.  But I do have to wonder if there might be a conflict of interest that would come into play if you stay in sales with your company and are trying to also be a part-time adjuster.  Maybe your sales job is in the health&life field??.....then no conflict??  That might also explain why you weren't familiar with what a public adjuster is. 

    Then again...here in my part of the Heartland of America, public adjusters are a very rare commodity.  The ones I have dealt with here locally are much different than those that get involved in the cat losses.  Of the 3 I dealt with here in Nebr, 2 were retired staffers that were out looking just to kill time & keep in touch with the job, and try to help out some folks.  They probably turned out to be a bigger help to me than they were to the insured, on a10% fee schedule.  One of those losses was with an insured who is a high profile atty.  I had handled a loss previously for him, and everything went pretty much hunky-dory, but then he had a house fire & decided it was more economical for him to hire someone else to walk in his shoes for him so he could devote his own time to his practice.  It kind of bothered me at first when he told me he was hiring a PA, but then I remembered the difficulties we had had prior with his own unavailability.  It worked out really good, because the PA had to go thru all the cancellations & delays instead of me.       

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    dcmarlin
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    07/17/2008 2:06 AM

    I hate to be negative but it is amazing how many people think they can become an adjuster overnight.

    In the words of Mr. Olympia, Ronnie Coleman, "Everybody wants to be a body builder but nobody wants to lift heavy-ass things."

    Gimme a bottle of anything and a glazed donut ... to go! (DLR)
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    StormSupport
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    07/17/2008 3:25 PM

    Stock Illustration - people waiting
for train. fotosearch
- search clipart,
illustration,
drawings and vector
eps graphics images

    Do the right thing, ALWAYS
    ~Meg~
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    sbeau4014
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    07/17/2008 8:15 PM

    http://www.tdi.state.tx.us/licensin...160;  Texas all lines-basically all claims adjusting

    http://www.tdi.state.tx.us/licensin...160;  Property, Casualty and Surety claims only

    http://www.tdi.state.tx.us/licensin...160;  Work Comp and USL&H only

    http://www.tdi.state.tx.us/licensin...160;  Public Adjuster-Only adjusts claims for the policyholder-requires a $10,000 bond

    http://www.tdi.state.tx.us/licensing/agent/revagtemeradj.html    Temporary/Catastrophe adjuster.

    Above are links to the TDI site that talks about the main 5 types of adjuster lincenses in TX.  All lines qualifies you to handle any claim that comes in the door, including Property, Casualty, Surety, Fidelity, WC, USL&H, Jones Act, all marine claims, etc.  Next one are only the property, casualty and surety.  Next is basic WC and United States Longshore and Harborworkers (Port workers comp).  Next is PA who doesn't work for carriers or Independent Adjusting companies, but only for the policy holders and are paid by the policyholder.  Last group is if you don''t live there and come in on temporary basis to work emergency claims or catastrophe work.  You said you have been an agent,, and if you have your CPCU or AIC, you may not need to take any test.  I moved there in 90 and didn't have to take any test as I was licensed in Okla, plus went through GAB schools.  One of those got me my multilines license, I finished AIC right after that and sent in the certificate and they upgraded to All lines for freeby. And after being licensed there for 20 years they waive the CE requirement (I heard that is due to the fact you are so old at that point it is a waste of time trying to teach you anything). 

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    Medulus
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    07/18/2008 2:35 PM
    Not sure I get the post, Meg. Are those Texas adjusters lining up to ride the cat train?
    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
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    StormSupport
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    07/18/2008 5:53 PM

    That's the line of people who are signing up to be 'Rich Cat Adjusters"

    I was just being silly!   

    Do the right thing, ALWAYS
    ~Meg~
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    Medulus
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    07/18/2008 6:28 PM

    It looks like the number of people who were lined up with me to ride the Amtrack Coaster yesterday afternoon because they had one of theeir trains go down and more people are discovering the coaster each week because of the high gas prices.

    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
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    MissKitty11
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    12/18/2013 10:46 AM
    Posted By dcmarlin on 07/17/2008 2:06 AM

    I hate to be negative but it is amazing how many people think they can become an adjuster overnight.

    In the words of Mr. Olympia, Ronnie Coleman, "Everybody wants to be a body builder but nobody wants to lift heavy-ass things."



    I don't think the OP is wanting anything overnight.  In fact, he states just the opposite by wanting to start slow and very PT.  I'll admit I've not read a lot on this forum yet, but so far all I've seen is most (not all) folks saying what he can't do and why.  What he needs to know is what DOES work.  How do most folks get started?  What is the preferred path?

    I'm in the same boat.  I got licensed early this year...TX, FL and OK licenses so far...but no work.  I'm on a major IA roster, but do I need to try to be on 50 rosters?  

    I'm perfectly willing to "lift heavy-ass things".  LOL

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    ChuckDeaton
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    12/18/2013 11:53 AM
    It's fairly well established that experts, experts at anything, have about 10,000 hours of practice behind them.

    Not only is being "willing" to lift necessary, lifting is imperative.

    Send your resume to all the companies on the CADO list.

    Send me your email and I will send you information related to flood adjusting. Just reading thru the material will take several weeks, but your knowledge of adjusting will be enhanced.
    "Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
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    AcceleratedAdjuster
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    12/18/2013 4:58 PM
    Posted By MissKitty11 on 12/18/2013 10:46 AM
    Posted By dcmarlin on 07/17/2008 2:06 AM

    I hate to be negative but it is amazing how many people think they can become an adjuster overnight.

    In the words of Mr. Olympia, Ronnie Coleman, "Everybody wants to be a body builder but nobody wants to lift heavy-ass things."



    I don't think the OP is wanting anything overnight.  In fact, he states just the opposite by wanting to start slow and very PT.  I'll admit I've not read a lot on this forum yet, but so far all I've seen is most (not all) folks saying what he can't do and why.  What he needs to know is what DOES work.  How do most folks get started?  What is the preferred path?

    I'm in the same boat.  I got licensed early this year...TX, FL and OK licenses so far...but no work.  I'm on a major IA roster, but do I need to try to be on 50 rosters?  

    I'm perfectly willing to "lift heavy-ass things".  LOL


    Well, the first thing you should know about being a good adjuster is that attention to detail is critical if you wish to turn adjusting into a career, rather than something you manage to get someone to hire you to "do" doing hurricanes. Little details like " I don't think the OP is wanting anything overnight.  In fact, he states just the opposite by wanting to start slow and very PT." can seem reasonable on the surface, until you consider the fact that the OP was made 5 1/2 years ago. Little (but obviously missed) details like that can sink you if you are presenting something to a carrier :).  

    www.acceleratedadjusting.com www.acceleratedadjustingisrael.com
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