PrevPrev Go to previous topic
NextNext Go to next topic
Last Post 04/28/2007 3:05 PM by  Ray Hall
Business Casual
 23 Replies
Sort:
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages
Ray Hall
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts:2443


--
03/31/2007 6:11 PM

    Report of duty or a class- Dress code- Business Casual

    I have been watching the gathering of adjusters for several years. Seems about 25% know the definition, 20% try hard , 20% make some attempt.and 35%  did not read the instructions or have defiant leanings.

    CATdawg
    Member
    Member
    Posts:96


    --
    04/01/2007 9:38 AM
    I'm mystified why there is so much resistance to complying with the modest dress codes in the adjusting world. Khakis and an Oxford shirt are, for me, more comfortable than jeans and tee-shirt anyway. And I like the ankle support of boots instead of sneakers (plus, sneakers are really difficult to polish...).

    What I don't like are ill-fitting "logo polos" from vendors and carriers made from cheap fabric. Especially if I have to pay a markup for the privilege of looking like a bag boy.

    My favorite shirts are the Brooks Bros. non-iron 100% cotton button-downs. Mine still need no ironing even after around 30 launderings.

    One can have clothing of choice embroidered with the logo of choice while working a storm. I've seen some pretty snappy-looking folks who took this approach.

    If I add a bowtie and an adult hat, nobody will suspect that I slept in my truck the night before. Shaving helps, too.

    To the rebellious: Resistance Is Futile!

    In fact, some vendors will remove you from a meeting, storm help room, etc. if you are considered "out-of-uniform". This is not the way one wishes to be "noticed".
    Lee Norwood, aka "CATdawg"
    Gale Hawkins
    PowerClaim.com
    Member
    Member
    Posts:386


    --
    04/01/2007 11:20 AM

    Guys, have you not heard it is what that is on the inside not outside that counts.

    Back about 30-40 years ago lawyers were going to blend and started wearing jeans and the like. That did not last long because they were loosing cases in the courtroom when going up against a lawyer in a suit in part because the jury expected a lawyer to be in a suit and discounted those dressed in jeans as inferior.

    Someone said you may not be able to player the part but at least you can dress the part. I do not think sending our kids off to school, church, etc looking like bums is in their long term interest. I have seem belly buttons showing at interviews and guys with no less than 10 ear rings. Someone is telling someone first impressions are not important.

    ddreisbach
    Member
    Member
    Posts:172


    --
    04/01/2007 11:41 AM
    I have to wear logo shirts, so I get good quality polos and have them embroidered. I prefer button-down oxfords but don't want to deal with the laundry and ironing problem.

    So, Lee, I'd like to try the Brooks Bros shirts. Where do I get them?

    BTW, I buy Farah khakis at Wally World for $12. They're comfortable, cheap and machine washable. When they get stained or worn I throw them out.

    David
    Betrock
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:12


    --
    04/01/2007 3:08 PM

    I wear the Dickies work pants with the cell phone pocket.  Don't use the pocket for cell phone, I just like the pants.

    They are a thick, super permanent press, stain resistant, fade resistant material.  They come in colors - grey, black and khaki are nice.

    They are about $19 - $22 at Wally World or the like.

    Even though they are men's pants they fit well, and hold up under abuse - sliding on roofs, etc.

    I do wear the insurer-supplied polos because they are free.  They are all men's sizes and so don't always

    fit well in the shoulder, but tucked in with a belt, I manage to look presentable.

    The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes... but in having new eyes. -Marcel Proust
    Tom Toll
    Moderator & Life Member
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:1865


    --
    04/02/2007 8:33 AM
    Janice and I both wear the Galls Tactical T-111 pants. They are designed for Police/EMT use, but are very practical for adjusting. They have large pockets, many of them, extremely durable, have a knee insert that you can put a foam piece in for kneeling, and wrinkle resistant.  They cost $39.95, but last for years. Their tactical shirts are also very comfortable and durable with two pockets. I despise the logo knit shirts that the companies delve out with no pockets. Apparently none of the claims folks who order them have climbed a roof and needed a pencil or pen.
    Galls.com
    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.
    Medulus
    Moderator
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:786


    --
    04/02/2007 12:13 PM
    Posted By A. M. Honahan on 04/01/2007 3:08 PM

    I do wear the insurer-supplied polos because they are free.

    In my experience, A.M., free comes with a price.  The last few times I worked for one of the logo shirt companies, my income dipped by 40%.  Must have been all those required hand written log notes about every thought that crossed my mind while handling the claim.  I certainly hope they've gotten away from the hand written notes.  I'm not too proud to work for them, but if there's another option I'll take it. 
    It feels good to go out to meet the public with permanent pressed khakis and a reasonable Dickies shirt with a pocket or two.
    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
    donnyboy
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:5


    --
    04/02/2007 3:01 PM
    Business casual does not mean jeans, t-shirts, fatigues, shorts or anything less than khakis style pants, and a good shirt, either a polo, or logo or a "Dickies" style work shirt. Clean is also a given.

    As a supervisor of over 125 adjusters for Katrina, I was amazed at what some "CAT Adjusters", considered business casual.

    Our profession has expanded greatly in the last three years due to the high volume of claims in 2004 and 2005, and this has led to a general lowering of all standards that we have known and held ourselves to.

    As in all endevors the cream will work its way to the top, again. The professionals in our industry will keep holding themselves to a higher standard and will last longer, be employed more time each year, and continue to train and improve each year so they will not have to go back to a day job.

    Donny Reed
    Ray Hall
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:2443


    --
    04/02/2007 6:31 PM

    I have not worked for a logo shirt company in about 9 years. At one time Allstate had white oxford cloth with a pocket for $20.00 from Landmark. I purchased several and had the long sleeves cut and hemed. The last one,s I wore.

    If they insist you wear the no pockets shirt from China, they should furnish matching parachute cloth pant and a clown nose.

    HuskerCat
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:762


    --
    04/02/2007 8:11 PM
    On the other side of the spectrum, how about requiring adjusters climbing on roofs in their blue suits, white shirts & ties?  And not that many years ago, either...but I guess someone finally saw the light.  Not only uncomfortable (body & psyche) on a hot summer day for the adjuster, but the policyholders looked at you funny too.    
    Catmannn
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:45


    --
    04/03/2007 8:10 AM
    I have found that putting on a clean pair of slacks is just as easy as putting on an old pairs of jeans with holes on the knees and patches on the ass.


    David Houtz
    Ray Hall
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:2443


    --
    04/03/2007 12:40 PM
    David it still works on  regular claims. When you meet the roofer at the house @ 16:30, because you have been "busy' on other business all day. Leave your suit jacket on the hanger in the back seat, open the truck, put on your climbing shoes, loosen your tie, unfold your ladder and get on the roof and get down on your knees looking for hits with your zoom camera, works ever time.
    Betrock
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:12


    --
    04/05/2007 10:00 AM
    Posted By Steve Ebner on 04/02/2007 12:13 PM
    In my experience, A.M., free comes with a price.  The last few times I worked for one of the logo shirt companies, my income dipped by 40%.  Must have been all those required hand written log notes about every thought that crossed my mind while handling the claim.  I certainly hope they've gotten away from the hand written notes.  I'm not too proud to work for them, but if there's another option I'll take it. 
    Hey Steve,
    Right now work is work!  I don't miss the pocket because I wear a photographer's vest.  I do dislike having my 'undies' turn red when the damn things run!  Oh well!
    Best to all,
    Anne
    The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes... but in having new eyes. -Marcel Proust
    StormSupport
    Gold Member
    Member
    Member
    Posts:203


    --
    04/05/2007 12:02 PM

    TMI

    Do the right thing, ALWAYS
    ~Meg~
    Linda
    Life Member
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:35


    --
    04/07/2007 9:36 AM

    First impressions are lasting.....

    Let's look at it from the insured's point of view. You ring their door bell and what they see is the person who is going to make an impact on their life--you are the one with the checkbook-remember?. Do you look believeable? Do you look like a professional who knows what they are doing? Would you believe a person who shows up with their shirt tail hanging out, clothing rumpled, shoes dirty and worn out and with yesterday's beard? Would you believe this person when they tell you there is no damage? or would they think you were simply too lazy to look? Would you believe a woman who shows up with tight jeans and a Harley t-shirt and tells you they are your adjuster? You may very well be one of the most honest conscientious knowledgable adjusters in the world but I wouldn't believe you. My next call would be either to my agent or the carrier asking for another adjuster.

    You see, the insured's hasn't gotten past that first impression when they opened the door and there you stood.

    I have heard just about all the excuses out there. Most of them begin with, "What difference does it make how I look so long as I am closing claims?" Well, it does make a difference when the phone starts ringing and it's the carrier telling the supervisor to send another adjuster back out. You may never know why that claim was re-inspected or why you had to split the billing with the second guy. The insured may have been so put off by your physical appearance they didn't point out all the damages (which you should have found anyway) or in some cases just didn't want to deal with someone who looked like they had slept in their clothes and didn't know custom millwork from a 2x4 and didn't care. IF you don't care about you then why would you care about their claim?

    It all boils down to perception of pride. If you take pride in your appearance then the perception is that you take pride in your work and know what you are doing. There is a reason for those free logo shirts other than for identification. It is to prevent the Harley t-shirts and whatever else you may wear that is totally inappropriate. Yes, they do make great paint rags!

    While I am on this pride business and Steve, I apologize for adding more to the mix, but would you track mud into your own home? If it's muddy outside, then do the interior first or if that would knock you too far off your game, then please take your shoes off at the door. Photos from the insureds of the muddy footprints you left behind on their white carpet do get in the hands of the carriers. It's that pride thing again. If you look like a bum and treat their home like a barnyard then you have just removed the last twinkle of confidence they had about you.

    There was a reason adjusters used to wear jackets and ties. Think about it for a minute. The insured sees someone who delivers the perception of being a professional in the carrier's office and they are personally going to handle your claim. Would you believe them? Probably. While you may have a hundred claims sitting in your vehicle--the only one the insured is concerned with is one--theirs! I admit those days are mostly over but there are still a few carriers who do prefer them.

    Remember you are representing the carrier regardless of what your actual employment situation may be. Ask yourself if you would want someone who looks like they just crawled out from under the bridge to be in a position to affect, in all probability, your greatest investment--your home.

    The same scenario applies to a commercial claim.  The insured may have millions at stake and someone who can affect not only his livelihood but the livelihood of his employees is you.  If you are a professional then look like one.

    rickhans
    Member
    Member
    Posts:111


    --
    04/07/2007 3:43 PM

    There is another angle to the pocketless logo shirts that has not been mentioned.  How many like myself have to use reading glasses to write notes and roof measurements, but can't walk a roof safely with the glasses on?  Over the years I have tried various ways to carry my glasses. The only thing that works for me is a good pocket on my shirt for my glass case so I can pull my glasses out and in many times per day.  If they are in a pants pocket, they get smashed and broken when climbing around roofs or under a house.  Only a loose fitting shirt with a good size pocket works.

    Ray Hall
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:2443


    --
    04/07/2007 4:51 PM

    Linda your post on this subject demands an encore.

    How about something like this for the carriers to think about. An iron on logo that could be ironed onto the shirt made of oxford cloth in white, pale blue, pale yellow  and khaki. The shirts can be purchased at any department store for less than $20.00 each, and light starched for less than $1.00 each day.

    The carrier furnishes the logo and the adjuster can work a 3 month storm at a cost of $100.00 for shirts and $100.00 for laundry and not look like he slept in his PU.

    Olivegreen
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:15


    --
    04/08/2007 11:50 AM
    Tom- I too have grown fond of fatigues and will be giving the Galls a try, as they should look better than the el-cheapos I have now. My cousin bought some form of dickies EMT pants and they worked great for him.

    Donny- I like being able to step out of the car and go to work. I think that makes me look like I know what I'm doing more so than rummaging around clipping stuff on my belt.

    I wear them in conjunction with a button-down shirt, logo embroidered by a shop in my hometown, which I do my best to keep ironed, usually changing once during the day.
    donnyboy
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:5


    --
    04/09/2007 1:52 PM

    It is obvious this subject is important from the number of replies and views of this thread.

    Olive - my reference was to camouflage pants (BDUs)  not the style worn by EMT - Police - etc.  That style has been accepted by everyone that I know of.

    Here is a simple dress code that I am currently working with:

    Collared shirts, slacks, socks and shoes are required.  No camouflage fatigues, blue jeans, t-shirts, sandals, sweat pants, sweat shirts or shorts are acceptable.

    Donny

    BobCAT
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:5


    --
    04/09/2007 2:54 PM
    I totally agree with the professional look of khaki pants and a pocketed shirt. As for the logo shirts that are free, I have yet to find any, I have had to pay for mine!!!
    Ray Hall
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:2443


    --
    04/09/2007 3:07 PM

    This may be a good time to say NO.  I will not pay for those cheezy shirts; but if  you insist give me your logo and I will have it sewn on an oxford cloth shirt.  Stand up do not look like a sacker from Krogers.

    Tom Toll
    Moderator & Life Member
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:1865


    --
    04/09/2007 3:08 PM

    The Galls tactical pants T-111 look like casual khaki pants, with a lot of pockets. I would wear nothing but these pants, due to the type fabric and longevity of the material. They come in several colors, not just khaki. I have tan, blue, and green. They are very wrinkle resistant and very durable for the price. Janice and I wear them everywhere, not just while working, due to the comfort of the pants and their looks.

    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.
    Tom Toll
    Moderator & Life Member
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:1865


    --
    04/09/2007 3:12 PM

    I am in complete agreement with Ray. Those pitiful looking, no pocket shirts are pathetic. The logo would cost the vendors and companies less and would allow us to get collared, decent looking shirts. Of course, I have not seen a red shirt in a long time, LOL. Good idea Ray, you tha man.

    Of course, that may too practical for all those folks to handle.

    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.
    Ray Hall
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:2443


    --
    04/28/2007 3:05 PM

    This may be a good time to think about how you will look this hail season. This subject should be on your mind each day as the best dressed seem to work more storms.

    You are not authorized to post a reply.


    These Forums are dedicated to discussion of Claims Adjusting.

    For the benefit of the community and to protect the integrity of the ecosystem, please observe the following posting guidelines: 
    • No Advertising. 
    • No vendor trolling / poaching. If someone posts about a vendor issue, allow the vendor or others to respond. Any post that looks like trolling / poaching will be removed.
    • No Flaming or Trolling.
    • No Profanity, Racism, or Prejudice.
    • Terms of Use Apply

      Site Moderators have the final word on approving / removing a thread or post or comment.