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Last Post 12/22/2011 8:04 PM by  HuskerCat
Ladder Safety
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Tom Toll
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10/09/2006 1:25 PM
    I hope all remember how to set up their ladders to prevent ladder accidents.
    A safety scenario: Ladder safety while in transport.
    Our ladders are a necessary tool in order to complete claim assignments. How we carry our ladders is a vital safety concern also. I have seen adjusters put long ladders in the pick up bed with no red flags on the end and do not secure them from flying out of the bed while in transport. That scenario is an accident looking for a place to happen.

    Always red flag your ladder tail if it extends further than 3 feet from your tailgate. Always secure the ladder in the bed so it will not lift out and fall on the road. There were several people killed last week when a firemans ladder came loose from his truck, and landed in the road. A car hit the ladder and large truck, causing loss of control of the vehicles, resulting in head on collisions and fatalities. There is not enough insurance coverage in the world to handle this type of scenario, plus having to live with yourself because your negligence caused the loss of life. The driver had the ladder secured with an old rope that obviously failed due to age and deterioration. Straps will also deteriorate with age. Both should be replaced at least once a year to prevent this possiblity.

    I would highly recommend everyone use plastic coated steel cables so deterioration and strength would not be a factor. It may cost a little more, but the satisfaction of safety should be the reward. Ladder racks are not necessarily the answer, as you have to tie in the ladder there too, unless you have a metal mechanical safety device.

    Common sense safety should always be applied, no matter what kind of hurry you are in.


    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.
    Tags: Safety
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    PORTASATGUY
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    10/10/2006 10:42 PM
    Yes and I for one can honestly say, dont be in a hurry to "GET ON THE ROOF" and get the job done. Make sure you set your ladder up with at least 3' above the top rung past the roof line, and make sure when you step onto the roof, that you have a sure foot.

    Its like Mr. Toll said....Common scense!
    R. Estes
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    gordon1
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    10/11/2006 1:40 AM
    Never ever place the ladder on concrete of asphalt.Grass is preferable. After 15 years and a bunch of roofs, I fell off of a ladder for the 1st time in 15 years, because I got careless at the end of the day & put mine on concrete. I had "shake"tested it on the way up & it was fine. I did my roof measurements,photos & diagram. I placed one foot on it to see if it was sturdy, which it appeared to be. As soon as my 2nd foot went on the ladder,it slipped from under me. I fell off of a 9' roof, flat onto concrete & cracked my head & elbow. That was 2 days before Thanksgiving.I was more fortunate than some & only ended up with a cantelope sized elbow with 3 stiches, but I may not be so lucky next time. I could have cracked my skull.It was a real wake up call, which I definitely have heeded since.Hopefully everyone will put their safety first, because no amount of money in the world can replace our health & well being. STAY SAFE !!!
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    PORTASATGUY
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    10/11/2006 11:04 AM
    Amen Gordon! [b] [/b]
    R. Estes
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    PvtNvestigator
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    10/11/2006 2:28 PM
    I would add to utilize the same routine each and every time that you secure your ladder after use. On a recent event in MN, I allowed myself to get distracted not once, but several times by the Insured and did not secure my 24' ladder on the top of my van. Fortunately, I was able to catch it each time, but not before driving down the road for some distance. Routine is so important to me in the things that are important..if that makes sense! I make sure that if once down from the roof, I will either immediatley put my ladder back up or lay it down in the grass so that it does not blow over or give someone small a chance to climb.
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    Darryl
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    10/11/2006 4:52 PM
    If anyone is interested I have some ladder safety info I use during training. Send me email requesting same and I'll return. Many ladders slip because the base is too far from the house.
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    MDC
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    10/15/2006 10:40 PM
    Good discussion.
    I would also recommend using a tie off on the gutter spike to prevent the ladder from falling over. I used a flexible tie purchased at Home Depot to tie my ladder off every time when possible. They come two to a pack and are about 24" long.
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    BobH
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    10/15/2006 11:19 PM
    Always good to bring up this topic, to keep it fresh. Those interested should also check out this thread from earlier this year: http://www.catadjuster.org/forum/tm.asp?m=22062 Lots of good info, if that link doesn't work for you, do a search using the words "ladder safety" on the forum archive.
    Bob H
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    Catmannn
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    10/21/2006 7:51 AM
    I have the feet of my two ladders taped so that the spikes of the feet are pointing down. This is to make be alot smarter when there is no access to the roof from the dirt side. As I would need to cut the tpae to access the rubber feet.
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    Tom Toll
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    10/21/2006 3:24 PM
    Another point: Always walk to the structure with the ladder held horizontal to the ground surface. Upon reaching the point you wish to set up the ladder, look up to make sure there are no power lines in the area or lifting track of your ladder being placed on the structure.

    I had a friend, years ago that did not do this and upon raising his ladder, it hit an electrical line that was bare. Unfortunately, he did not survive the electrical shock. Wires are insulated, but objects near wiring can rub the insulation off, unbeknownst to an observer. Use your common sense, as what can happen will happen if you are not observant and conscious of your surroundings.
    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.
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    Mr Rob
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    10/27/2006 12:00 PM
    What is the opinion out there regarding the telescopic ladders used mostly for the double pulls?? I have a friend that loves his, no problems, but I spoke to another adjuster and his collapsed while he was on it.  Of course, if you don't lock it properly, this will happen, but I wonder if it was user error or a structural defect.............
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    KLS
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    10/27/2006 1:39 PM
    The only thing I use my telescopic ladder for now is to get into the attic through closet access hatches and even then I have to be REALLY careful not to hit the release buttons on the underside of the rungs as I climb up because the thing will collapse -- and I have to make double sure all the rungs are locked before I climb up in the first place. I used it for double pulls in the beginnning before I learned from experience it can collapse -- its not worth the potential injury/death for me to take it back up any more on a roof.

    KLS
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    gordon1
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    10/27/2006 10:01 PM
    An excellent thing to do is to bring your cell phone on the roof with you in case the ladder falls or someone swipes it. I spoke to an adjuster once who said he was on the rear slope, when someone came up to the front of the house & swiped his ladder. At least he was able to call someone to help him get off of the 2 story roof. I always bring my subglasses. Sun can be glaring.It is important to see what you are walking on.It also gets a bit hot. I wear a sweat band around my forehead to keep the sweat from blinding me.
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    Agility Cat
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    10/31/2006 9:34 AM
    Another tip for safety on ladder; sometimes the ground is wet, so are the sole of your shoes, and climbing the ladder, you will have a chance to slip. I've got from home depot a 3M safety walk outdoor tread.(it look and feel like shingle material 2" wide works great). you cut it to the size of your steps, pleel the back and apply firmly the strip onto the steps of the ladder; it does make a lot of difference climbing (grasp from the sole of the shoes to the srip). you will have some left over for sure. I took the left over, cut into strip of the width of my flipcase board (the one you carry with your forms, et all), applied them in the back of the case. >>> you can leave your board on the slope of the roof, it will not slide <<< how many times we are on the roof, put the clip board on the slope, and there it goes, on the ground. Not in that case. Or get a hook belt (passload framing nailer hook belt) and hook your clip board to it, so your hands are free when you climb and do your roof scope. ,
    Jean Paul Bouvret
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    brighton
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    11/02/2006 11:50 AM
    Before we got the pick up, we used our suburban to haul the 28" ladder. While is was a hassle to tie down the ladder using the four corners of the roof rack, it took the fear of the ladder falling off out of the equasion. Now with the pick up and its rack, there is the cable around the middle bracket and tie down on another. The cable like Tom said will last a lot longer and for us, slows down anyone who wants to steal it.

    Jean Paul made a great point about the 3M safety tread. It also works great on running boards of trucks and the back step of the bumper. Don't slip getting the ladder off and same for getting into the truck when it is wet.
    Rocke Baker
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    Gale Hawkins
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    11/02/2006 2:26 PM

    Per an adjuster I just got off the phone with “use your own ladder”. While all know this it can be tempting at times. The ladder collapsed and he broke a leg in three places and a lot of metal was used to put the pieces back together. Since it was only a couple weeks ago he will be grounded for a while. He is thankful he is otherwise OK and will be able to keep managing his growing IA firm.

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    Medulus
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    12/14/2006 11:00 AM

    Ladder Safety 101:  Lesson One

    Do not use this ladder!  It doesn't matter if you weigh 80 pounds.  I repeat, Do not use this ladder!

     

    DSCF1798.JPG

    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
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    Tom Toll
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    12/14/2006 11:33 AM
    Looks like it might by an unsafe ladder. Wonder if it is still under warranty.
    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.
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    Tom Toll
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    01/05/2007 2:05 PM
    Thats a good technique Dave. It is coming upon storm season again, so now is the time for ladder maintenance. Pull your ladders out, make sure all the rungs are secure, lubricate the joints, particularly on the little giants and knock offs. Clean the slides and put a light coat of talcum power on the slides, not too much and then wipe it down. Make sure the rubber on the feet  are in good condition too.
    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.
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    Medulus
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    03/20/2007 5:03 PM
    Ladder Safety 101: Lesson Two

    Ya know those claim examiners that are convinced that every roof must be climbed -- no matter what?

    Last night I found out where they receive their training. The dish network went out at 11PM. When it was still attempting to acquire a satellite signal at 11:30PM, I called dish network. I fought my way through the computer voice offering me multitudes of options until, finally, at 11:43 I reached an actual person. I explained the problem. She asked me if we were having bad weather. I told her it was winter in Scranton, PA, and there wasn't a blizzard or anything so I guessed it was as good as we could expect. She asked me if the satellite dish had ice and snow on it. I told her that I guessed it had ice and snow on it for the last two months, but the problem only started 45 minutes ago. Then she told me to go look at the satellite dish. I told her it was on the roof. She then told me (and I do not embellish here) that I was "going to have to go up on the roof". I told her that it was almost midnight and there was six to eight inches of snow on the roof. She again repeated her mandate, "Well, you're going to have to go up on the roof and look at the dish."

    Here's lesson two, folks. Don't go up on a snow covered gable roof at midnight, even if some desk jockey tells you that you must. Do what I did. Laugh at her! I know she makes minimum wage sitting in a cubicle in some second world country, but just simply laugh at her, nonetheless.

    Then wait for spring so you can once again watch TV.
    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
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