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Last Post 07/04/2013 1:20 PM by  pondman
Canada Licensing
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kluker@mediacombb.net
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06/23/2013 5:48 PM
    Has anyone had experience working claims in Canada? How did it go, and would you do it again? Any tips on licensing? Thanks!
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    R_Smith
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    06/24/2013 3:12 PM
    Working claims in Canada is much different than the continental US. First, you must have a work permit. Normally the Canadian employer requests the permit from the government to hire a non-citizen. Secondly, adjusters do not write estimates in Canada. Contractors write the estimates and the adjuster reviews the estimate.
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    kluker@mediacombb.net
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    06/24/2013 5:10 PM

    I appreciate the feedback!

     

    Kevin

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    host
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    06/25/2013 9:34 AM

    Here is a "Protocol for Expediting Adjuster Certificates" put out by the Alberta Insurance Council.

    Alberta legislation requires that all independent adjusters must hold a valid adjuster’s certificate of authority in order to act as an adjuster in the Province of Alberta. There are no provisions in the legislation to allow for the issuance of a “temporary” certificate during situations involving storms, flooding or other disasters. Only staff adjusters who are employees of insurance companies are exempt from licensing in Alberta.

    The Alberta Insurance Council (“Council”) has put a protocol of procedures in place to expedite the issuance of adjusters’ certificates of authority to non-residents applying as a result of a storm, flooding or other disasters in Alberta.

    In circumstances where the Insurance Adjusters’ Council considers it beneficial and necessary to utilize this protocol, Council will exercise the processes described in the document. Council will process properly completed applications on the following basis:

    1. without the original non-resident endorsement if the applicant holds a valid adjuster’s certificate in their resident jurisdiction where the Council can confirm their licensing status on the web site of their resident licensing authority;
    2. without the criminal record check on the assurance that a criminal record check will be provided within 60 days of the issuance of the certificate.

    The application submitted must be the original and signed by both the applicant and the Designated Representative of the adjusting firm the applicant is applying to represent. The AIC will accept a faxed or photocopied application to initiate the certification process, however the Certificate will not be issued until the original application, is received. The application must be fully completed and provide all required information, including address information. A fee payment must be included with the application.

    In order for the Council to assess an applicant’s eligibility to qualify for an Alberta Level 2 or 3 Adjuster’s certificate, we require a transcript from the Insurance Institute of Canada of the courses the applicant completed. In addition we must receive proof that the applicant holds an Associate, Fellow, CIP or FCIP designation as well as a short one-page summary detailing the applicant’s adjusting experience. If you are unable to provide this information at the time of application, the Council will issue a certificate as a Level 1 adjuster in order to expedite the issuance of the certificate.

    An application to upgrade a certificate at a later date may be made upon submission of the appropriate documentation and a $25 upgrade fee.

    If you have any questions, please contact Sylvia Boyetchko, Director of Licensing at 780-421-4148.

    The pdf of the actual document is listed below.  Here is a link to their website:  http://www.abcouncil.ab.ca/index.html

     

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    ChuckDeaton
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    06/25/2013 6:16 PM
    My suggestion is to do a detailed cost benefit analysis (finances) many of the field claims representatives who traveled to New Zealand have not been paid and several have initiated law suites.

    Review the coverage provided by any state side insurance policy, E & O, medical, workers comp, auto liability before crossing the border. Canada has socialized medicine, so if your are ill or injured, in Canada, the rules are different.

    Comply with the Canadian labor laws as they relate to non-Canadians.

    Laws relating to entry into the USA have changed, be certain that once you are in Canada that you can legally cross the border back into the US.
    "Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
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    stormcrow
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    06/26/2013 9:27 AM
    Left Calgary on the Sunday before the flood for a long assignment, will miss this event.
    Some comments. Canadian adjusters who CAN NOT write estimates are quickly finding they are no longer needed for storm work.
    The system here is slowly moving to a US style vendor system and companies are starting to recognize the benefits.
    You will need an assingment and a letter to get accross the border legally, and as noted below an Alberta licence. Call the Alberta Insurance Council first.
    Adjusters have snuck in in the past to work. If you get caught you will go straight to the airport and home. you will then be banned for 5 years and you will have to find a way to get your vehicle and belongings back. Hotels are expensive and full. Make sure if you get an assignment the vendor understands and follows the rules. There should be no problem if you know who you are working for. Calgary has had no reported looting, almost no price gouging (the names of the gougers are being widely circulated). People are helping each other and giving freely of there time. Even thought the Calgary Stampede grounds were under water, with the help of volunteers it is expered to open later next week on time. Local insurances offices are starting to reopen as of today. If you get a chance follow the rules good luck and make some money.
    I want to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like his passengers.
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    CatAdjusterX
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    06/28/2013 2:05 AM
    Posted By stormcrow on 6/26/2013 9:27:58 AM
    Left Calgary on the Sunday before the flood for a long assignment, will miss this event.
    Some comments. Canadian adjusters who CAN NOT write estimates are quickly finding they are no longer needed for storm work.
    The system here is slowly moving to a US style vendor system and companies are starting to recognize the benefits.
    You will need an assingment and a letter to get accross the border legally, and as noted below an Alberta licence. Call the Alberta Insurance Council first.
    Adjusters have snuck in in the past to work. If you get caught you will go straight to the airport and home. you will then be banned for 5 years and you will have to find a way to get your vehicle and belongings back. Hotels are expensive and full. Make sure if you get an assignment the vendor understands and follows the rules. There should be no problem if you know who you are working for. Calgary has had no reported looting, almost no price gouging (the names of the gougers are being widely circulated). People are helping each other and giving freely of there time. Even thought the Calgary Stampede grounds were under water, with the help of volunteers it is expered to open later next week on time. Local insurances offices are starting to reopen as of today. If you get a chance follow the rules good luck and make some money.

    ....................................................

    Crawford and Company (Canada) has deployed adjusters to the affected areas. According to the article Roy posted on the CADO main page, they (Canadian carriers) seem to have things well under control with regard to numbers.

    Stormcrow, just curious as to," how does one go about grabbing an IA license from a foreign country?" Again, I don't plan on doing it but do you think that Canada would recognize a US claims adjuster and grant such a license through reciprocity?  

    "A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
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    olderthendirt
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    07/03/2013 10:50 PM
    Best bet is to call the Insurance Council of (name of province) and ask about requirements in each jurisdication.
    Life is like a sewer, what you get out of it depends on what you put in it
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    pondman
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    07/04/2013 1:20 PM
    Gotta love the ol' K.I.S.S. method
    Give them what they want, when they want it, and how they want it !
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