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Last Post 03/20/2013 7:19 PM by  jghager
Eberls - SF Auto Certification March Exam
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jghager
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03/07/2013 1:15 PM

    Hi Newbie here,

    Wanted to know if some of you seniors can give me any advise as to the best way to procure placement on rosters?  

    Here's a little background:

    AS-legal studies; BA-business management; 10 yrs of insurance and legal experience;16 yrs of customer service; bi-lingual (eng/spa); 2.20 FL license; and FL all-lines adjuster license

    I am going this weekend to the NFIP conference; am scheduled to take my SF auto exam on the 21st; and SF property exam on the 28-29th.  Am I on the right track here?

    Any comments and suggestions are greatly appreciated.  Thanks a bunch, have a wonderful day!

    Jghager :) 


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    Medulus
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    03/08/2013 12:57 PM
    When I went independent back in 1998, I used the CADO website to get started. At the top of the page are two tabs - one called "Directory" and one called "Channels". I would suggest starting with the "Channels" first. When you click on that tab you get a drop down that includes "Employer Ratings". Check out how other catadjusters have rated various potential employers and choose at least a few that are rated well. The last thing you want is to go out on a catastrophe on your own dime and not be paid, or paid so slowly that you have to worry about cash flow. Having once chosen who you want to apply with, then go to the "Directory" tab and check for "Employers" in the drop down menu. Find the contact information for the companies you wish to apply to and start sending your resume and cover letter to them. Most will send you back an application and other materials they require to get on their roster.
    Eventually you will get to where you work for one company most of the time, if not exclusively. But always have a backup because this business is fickle and you need to know you have a fallback vendor in case you rub someone wrong at your primary vendor. You may, after some time, get to the point where I am, and several others, where the vendors call you even when you haven't signed up with them. But don't expect that to happen in the near future.

    Stick with it, do a great job and you may learn to "move like jghager" (couldn't resist!).

    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
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    pondman
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    03/08/2013 1:08 PM
    Steve,

    I will do the same with you as I do with Chuck. I have the music ready....now I wanna see you post a video to the music for all of us.

    We wanna see you "Move like Jghager" LOL
    Give them what they want, when they want it, and how they want it !
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    CatAdjusterX
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    03/08/2013 10:47 PM

    Hi Newbie here,

    Wanted to know if some of you seniors can give me any advise as to the best way to procure placement on rosters? 

     

    ....................................................................................................................

    Steve gives strong advice. There are over 100+ IA firms listed in CADO's directories. I do want to give you a major caveat: You should ensure that you NEVER send your resume and cover letter to an IA firm that specifically calls for minimum years of experience in order to be considered for roster placement.

    When I received resumes from rookie adjusters with NO experience in response to looking for "qualified and experienced" adjusters, it frustrated me to no end. Yet my supervisor took it a step further and barred that adjuster from any further consideration in the future.

    Simply put, when someone applies to an IA firm advertisement that specifically calls for  MINIMUM years of experience, knowing full well that they do NOT qualify tells us two important traits:

    1) The rookie adjuster applying either does NOT pay attention to detail

    or

    2) DID pay attention to detail yet felt the rules do NOT apply to them.

    Both of these traits are not conducive to become a CAT adjuster 

    "A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
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    CatAdjusterX
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    03/09/2013 12:54 AM

    Please elaborate a bit on the following:

    You write about attending an NFIP conference. Whilst any adjuster, experienced or not are allowed to attend these workshops, only those with a minimum of 4 years of continuous verifiable experience are eligible for becoming NFIP certified and issued an FCN#. The 4 year requirement is for Manufactured (Mobile) and residential (Dwelling). To handle Commercial Large Loss and RCBAP (Condominium) requires 5 years of verifiable continuous experience.

    Now there are exceptions to that requirement. I had 3 of my members recently that were able to participate in an NFIP Mentor program and as a result of that, were issued provisional FCN#'s that stated they were qualified to handle NFIP flood claims provided they are doing so under the supervision of an IA firm that is participating in the NFIP Mentor Program. Colonial Claims/Pilot are two of those firms off of the top of my head. Eberl's may in fact be another, but not positive. My members who were a part of the NFIP Mentor Program had 1 to 2 years of experience. In those cases, the FCN#'s issued turned out to be NOT provisional and as such they can now work NFIP claims for any vendor

    So I just want you to know that unless you are accepted into one of these mentor programs, attending an NFIP annual workshop will be of little return. My experience with these workshops is whilst informative, you would learn the same amount of knowledge by downloading a copy of the Standard Flood Insurance Policy 

    "A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
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    CatAdjusterX
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    03/09/2013 1:34 AM
    Posted By Hager on 07 Mar 2013 01:15 PM

    Hi Newbie here,

    Wanted to know if some of you seniors can give me any advise as to the best way to procure placement on rosters?  

    Here's a little background:

    AS-legal studies; BA-business management; 10 yrs of insurance and legal experience;16 yrs of customer service; bi-lingual (eng/spa); 2.20 FL license; and FL all-lines adjuster license

    I am going this weekend to the NFIP conference; am scheduled to take my SF auto exam on the 21st; and SF property exam on the 28-29th.  Am I on the right track here?

    Any comments and suggestions are greatly appreciated.  Thanks a bunch, have a wonderful day!

    Jghager :) 

    ....................................................

    In addition to my other posts, I wanted to put something else on your radar. Being that you hold a 4 year degree, you should at the very least consider applying directly with a carrier as a staff adjuster trainee. In the CAT industry for independent adjusters, the learning curve is very steep and is sink or swim. Hence the reasoning for most rookie independent adjusters failing on their first and only event (Upwards of 60%+). Make NO mistake, some rookie adjusters will not only survive but thrive.

    The single most common cause for adjusters quitting or being asked to leave their first event is the lack of fundamentals in regard to their estimating software (in the CAT industry that is XM8). So if you choose to go the independent route, my advice is to ONLY spend money on one thing after you are initially licensed, XM8.

    I am NOT a fan of most certifications, yet I strongly believe there is one certification that will make a rookie adjuster's resume stand out from their peers and will actually GET them deployed whilst most importantly KEEPING them deployed:

    The XM8 Level 3 certification 

    I would advise that you do NOT accept any deployment offer until you have at least an XM8 level 2 knowledge/certification. But having the level 3 certification is hugely important.

    In addition (for the IA) policy is important to understand. Granted most carriers do NOT want their IA's talking policy with the insured, yet you don't want to recommend replacing a roof based upon deferred maintenance. You need to understand the HO-1/2/3/4/etc.... (Homeowners) series of policies (HO-3 being the most common) as well as the differences from Schedule A/B/C/D/E/etc....... You should also understand the DP 1/2/3/etc...series of policies (Dwelling Policy)

    You can learn about them and download examples of all of the above at:

    www.claimspages.com

    The best part about this knowledge is it can be learned at NO cost to you

    Although getting the State Farm Auto and Residential certifications will greatly help you get your foot in the door (SF is one of the largest carriers with the most PIF's in the nation), many folks including myself would NEVER work for them again. Simply put, the paperwork burden is somewhat antiquated and believe it or not up until recently they still used a form of DOS. It's just not conducive to efficiency. It is my understanding that they are overhauling their claims management system and that can only be a good thing. Just remember although many rookie adjusters get their start with SF, they are not the only game in town.

    Before you get the SF deal, you should seriously consider going the route of a staff adjuster trainee. Going that route will allow you to earn whilst you earn. You are paid to learn, they will train you. That would be my most fervent recommendation. Doing so will also give you a nice consistent income. The life of a CAT adjuster is one of feast or famine, especially in the early years of your career as an IA

     

     



    "A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
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    jghager
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    03/20/2013 7:19 PM
    Thank you so much for your feedback. I really appreciate it and will take you up on any further advice you have to give.

    Jghager :)
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