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Last Post 11/14/2014 10:59 AM by  jhooker
I fell off the roof for the first time in my life
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Olegred
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01/22/2010 6:40 PM

    I went on this 10/12 garage to mark the hail squares. I was with the contractor. Northern slope was all covered with algae. I was talking to the contractor and said, "I am not going on that slope". As these words  were coming out of my mouth, I started sliding. Slid all the way down, gaining speed and fell to the ground. The contractor ran like crazy to see if I was hurt, but I was really lucky that day.Slightly sprained ankle and scratches all over my hands from trying to stop that was it. What really saved me was the soft ground and my training as a skydiver, where I am used to falling and rolling :)  I was so scared, damn! when I was going down my only thought was, please let there be nothing on the ground that can hurt me. Now, no more algae slopes that's for sure. Luckily, it was my last claim for the day.

     

    Have you or your buddies ever fallen? How bad? Under what circumstances? 

     

    What a day!

     

    Thanks

    Tags: Safety
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    Ol' Ghost
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    01/22/2010 6:48 PM
    Now isn't it curious? Is this a case of Karma providing a life's lesson entitiled, 'Pride Goeth Before The Fall'?

    Ol' Ghost
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    Olegred
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    01/22/2010 6:57 PM
    No, the lesson would be to avoid algae wet slopes. I have 6 more scheduled for tomorrow, so I better be extra safe. :) Shit, that was scary :)
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    Olegred
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    01/22/2010 7:03 PM
    And by the way, you mix Christianity and buddhism/hinduism , both are stupid superstitions.
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    host
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    01/22/2010 10:57 PM

    Olegred I'm glad you're OK.  We have lost members in the past to falls.

    Take care and please be safe.

    Roy
     

     

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    sbeau4014
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    01/22/2010 11:05 PM
    Good thing you were not hurt and hopefully it will be a learning lesson that will stay with you forever. As for your comment about "both are stupid superstitions", not sure what to think of that. Are you saying that both of the religions mentioned are stupid superstitions? If so, that should be good for some really good comments coming your way.
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    moco
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    01/23/2010 12:56 AM
    The lesson learned is: If it looks unsafe, stay off unless you have proper eqpt. "Listen to your gut feeling". I fell the first and last time when i was 18 years old. Getting onto a flat roof from a step ladder that was already old and weak. I worked construction at the time straight out of school. I fell the full 8 feet rump first and was jammed up for 3 days from bruising and soreness. To this day if a roof looks unsafe I AM NOT getting on it. If i get on a roof and feel the sheathing giving way to much, i am getting off. Loose granules causing poor traction, i'm coming off. I use the zoom on my camera from the ground, or from a ladder leaned on the eave for these circumstances. NO job is worth your health or safety. They want an overall view, bingo. Here it is from Google Earth.
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    jpendergrass
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    01/23/2010 3:35 PM

    I get alot of funny looks in the summer time when I put on my US Army leather gloves before I get on a roof, Learned the same lesson as you years ago and tore up my hands, now like you , if it aint looking safe, stay off, rope off, or get help and I always WEAR MY GLOVES,  glad you are OK,

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    Olegred
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    01/23/2010 5:08 PM
    Yeah, thanks for all the suggestions. You know, what I've learnt that day was that how quickly bad shit happens, it was like really drop of a hat and I was on the ground. And second thing is NEVER HURRRY!!!! I bought the rope now and no more wet slopes. :)

    Do you all wear Cougar Paws?
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    StormSupport
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    01/23/2010 7:58 PM
    Posted By Olegred on 22 Jan 2010 07:03 PM
    And by the way, you mix Christianity and buddhism/hinduism , both are stupid superstitions.



     

    Is there anything you don't voice your opinion about?   I don't care for your language either; quite inappropriate in this environment.  

    You certainly are full of yourself, aren't you?

    Do the right thing, ALWAYS
    ~Meg~
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    Olegred
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    01/23/2010 8:01 PM
    No. Yes. :)
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    jdacree
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    01/23/2010 9:32 PM
    Two things help if you do not have a rope,

    1. Cougar paws are good, if the roof is not too wet. No help at all on snow, ice (alge is like ice), and frost.

    2. Sports Authority sells some "chains" that clip onto your shoes, AKA like the old roller skates. These chains look similar to the expanded metal on your b-b-q pit in that the forward edges are raised. I am using them on roofs that have snow which has frozen to a crust, or snow roofs with ice layered beneath the snow. In both cases as long as you are moving in the up or down direction you can throw your weight to the up slope, and dig in with the balls of your feet to stop/slow the side.

    Hope this helps and glad you are not hurt. Falling off a roof usually ends up with something bad happening, especially the older you get.
    Jim Acree Stupidity is the art of not trying to learn Ignorance is the lack of opportunity to learn I am ignorant
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    moco
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    01/23/2010 9:53 PM
     In both cases as long as you are moving in the up or down direction you can throw your weight to the up slope, and dig in with the balls of your feet to stop/slow the side.


    I bet  this attachment does little to stop the contraction of the hemorroid housing though.

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    jdacree
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    01/23/2010 10:09 PM
    moco, none at all, but during the contraction process you WILL get about 2" taller.
    Jim Acree Stupidity is the art of not trying to learn Ignorance is the lack of opportunity to learn I am ignorant
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    Bobabooey
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    01/24/2010 1:05 AM
    I have never fallen but have come very close several times. Algae on an asbestos roof, ice on a roof, and loose granules on a 10/12 (climbed down the downspout on that one) That was when I was younger. I will not get on a roof now where there is even the slightlest possibility that I will fall. I am older and wiser now. I am not going to climb on a roof that could kill me to make my supervisor more money. I can see it now, I fall off a roof and break my neck and my supervisor gets ticked off because now he has to assign it to someone else.

    Why are you on here if you are looking at 6 claims a day anyway????????
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    Ray Hall
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    01/24/2010 10:30 AM

    Steep roofs are the carriers largest liability exposure. We all know the consequence of not walking a steep roof. The carriers/vendors and all the prople who work for both enforce the no cure no pay rule, and some widows have cashed in and ever adjusters widow should seek the best law firm in the US. Why are  the satellite photos now allowed?  When I worked off shore on energy claims my wife knew who to call if I was killed, she still does on roof claims. Your employer can not contract away THEIR implied negligence.

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    JimGary
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    01/24/2010 11:31 AM

    I have fallen a couple times, never any serious damage, only scrapes bruises and the slightly soiled drawers. A couple thing I have learned in the process;

    1. GET A ROPE!! $250 will get enough equipment to be safe. A couple hundred $ worth of training will help too. (training has already been beaten to death on another thread, so please let it go)

    2. GET A ROPE!! But if you feel you just don't need a rope because your parents were part mountain goat, get some good shoes and stay in the valleys.

    3. GET A ROPE!! OK testosterone his in abundance and you just want to prove you can do it. You walk the ridge and ease down to draw your test square. Make sure there is a chimney or vent pipe or maybe a offset to land on.

    4. )@#$ IT, GET A ROPE!!! In the end, a rope and harness is the only real solution, cougar paws are good, but one misstep and your on you butt sliding down the slope. Vet pipes and chimneys are a good backup, but one step left or right and you miss the target. One option I didn't mention was doing the slope next to the pool, so if you do fall you hit the pool. Again. just GET A ROPE!!!

    JWG

    I know the voices aren't real, but sometimes they're right!
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    moco
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    01/24/2010 4:53 PM

    I see no actual need to get on top if a roof is steep. For the following reasons: 1) From the ground you can see evidence of wind damage, and even hail damage in some cases. Just ZOOM in and take your shot. Of course if there is hail damage you need to mark the test squares somehow (maybe extension pole of some type used from a ladder against the eave, with chalk or whatever you use attached to the front) 

    2) If it is not quite so steep, but steep enough to fall from, then i lean a ladder on the edge and take overall views of each slope all around. If they still want an overall view of all slopes together i will send one of the free aerial photos found from several online sites.

     

    3) For no one am i risking my life or health, and certainly not for the sake of earning a paycheck.

     

    This all should only apply to day claims, as i have heard that there are steep and high teams available with Cat work ?? I dunno though, as i have not worked a storm site.

     

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    Ray Hall
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    01/24/2010 6:41 PM

    I was trained over 50 years ago by two older adjusters, the vice president of property claims for the SW USA and the head fire and inland marine property examiner for the SW USA. Steep roofs came up on the first day. My instruction to get a file approved was: "get as close to it(roof) as you

    can. I have never had a roof claim regected in all my years. I did leave a sewer back up storm that turned into a roof/wind storm after 7 weeks and a new manager took over. "you will not get paid unless you take a photo from the ridge looking down the roof with  your car (that has the sign on the door). We all know who this was.

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    jlouden
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    01/25/2010 3:19 PM
    hahahahaha

    lulz
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