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Last Post 10/19/2011 6:28 PM by  ChuckDeaton
This is it. Computers and satellites are taking over.
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Olegred
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01/21/2010 3:37 PM

    As of today, major carrier would REQUIRE satellite measurements report on ALL roofs over 9/12 or with more than 12 planes.

     

    What was your experience with Geoestimator, Eagleview and such?

     

     

    Tags: Popular
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    Tim_Johnson
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    Posts:243


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    01/21/2010 4:07 PM
    WE have had real good luck with geoestimator
    Tim Johnson
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    Ray Hall
    Posts:2443


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    01/21/2010 9:14 PM

    Hmm. guess some of my post sound like a catastrophe "pundit" since 2003.

    I remember the old days when flood adjusters billed T & E files 40 hours in 24. NFIP got wise and went to fee billing and got faster closed files and better work, with reinspections.

    If Orem comes up with time unit cost to clean a heavy smoked coffee maker, they may put out a time converted to $ to estimate, but not closed tornado struck dwelling. Aaah good gracious. Working for wages with all these measurable units in the software and 2.5 or 3.0 hrs roof claims will be the norm.

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    Ray Hall
    Posts:2443


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    01/21/2010 9:19 PM

    Talked to a bud who will be a test sq. inspector on 2 story steep, but use the sat. image to measure. I saw a program on the learning channel they can take a close up and see hail hits, and his job will be replaced, this will wound the roof thumps profit center.

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    brighton
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    01/22/2010 7:34 AM
    Posted By Ray Hall on 21 Jan 2010 09:14 PM

    If Orem comes up with time unit cost to clean a heavy smoked coffee maker, they may put out a time converted to $ to estimate, but not closed tornado struck dwelling. Aaah good gracious. Working for wages with all these measurable units in the software and 2.5 or 3.0 hrs roof claims will be the norm.

    What can we say Ray? 2.5 hrs for a 30 sq 5/12 L shaped gable roof. Carrier pays $70/hr to include estimate, photos, milage and satalite photo @ $50. $175 total bill and the appraiser gets 60% of that. Used to be the 30 sq roof was $5,000.00 and the fee was $300 and 60% went to the appraiser and no satalite shot.

    It's getting this way and will continue to do so with better satalite imagery and availability. This along with the fact there are way more firms out there than are needed fighting over the same piece of pie and are willing to basically do the work for nothing to generate some income.

     

    Rocke Baker
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    Ray Hall
    Posts:2443


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    01/22/2010 5:10 PM

    Rocke its called progress for the carrier as fee,s are being cut. I think 5-6 closed per day would come close to 2.5 hrs each and be about a 14-16 hr day. If you had a helper and worked double shift at Brake Check about the same gross per year.

    The top 10% always do well and work as much as they want, thats not a new discovery.

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    Ray Hall
    Posts:2443


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    01/22/2010 5:16 PM

    Talked to a very good adjuster today and I was shocked. He said xactimate was too complex to close many losses in Denver, as the gutters were made out of steel, Gal. steel, aluminum and vinyl, sometimes all on the same house. How do you make a macro for this house and other like it.

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    Medulus
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    01/22/2010 6:11 PM

    Doesn't sound like a good candidate for a macro, but it doesn't seem terribly difficult either. Just get the measurements of each material and enter them as separate line items. One should use macros when they are appropriate and when they aren't, then don't. Of course, if they were allowed to use Simsol, they would be writing those reports up in half the time anyway, and if they couldn't use a macro they wouldn't be slowed down all that much.

    Haven't plugged Simsol in about a year, so I thought I would stir up the pot a bit.  Disclaimer:  I have no shareholder or stakeholder interest in Simsol other thanit is simply a simpler, more comprehensive program for adjusters who handle not only buildings, but also contents and time element claims.

    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
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    jbwiley
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    01/22/2010 8:59 PM

    Amen to that. I use to use Simson and now have to use Xact. My opinon, Xact is a POS.

     

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    Olegred
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    01/22/2010 9:56 PM
    Xact is the software of the future, i told you all so.
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    Tim_Johnson
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    01/23/2010 9:20 AM
    Don't turn out the lights, yet. Farmers / Foremost (die hard X users) have started a pilot program using Symbility (sp?). Reports from the adjusters are they really like the program. Symbility reports that their largest user in the U.S. is Chubb.
    Tim Johnson
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    Tom Toll
    Moderator & Life Member
    Posts:1865


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    01/23/2010 5:06 PM

    I have fooled around with symblity and like it.

    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.
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    Ray Hall
    Posts:2443


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    01/23/2010 5:14 PM

    Good management and smart also.

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    Olegred
    Advanced Member
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    01/23/2010 6:46 PM
    Any program that has graphical estimating in it and decent pricelist can compete with Xact. Simsol has neither.
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    Buford Gonzales
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    Posts:57


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    01/24/2010 11:22 AM
    Mearsured a roof using the builders plate and the pitch of each slope, then used assurecalc. Assurecalc was 5 sq smaller. I don't believe I missed the calc that far.
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    Olegred
    Advanced Member
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    01/26/2010 1:19 PM
    I've ordered a couple of reports and am anxious to compare them to my measurements. We'll see how accurate they are.
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    PSR
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    01/26/2010 2:30 PM
    I've used Eagle View in the past. It's been my experience that it's been +/- 1 square versus what I did myself. Good to have for when the contractor wants to say you're 5 squares short or something.
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    Bobabooey
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    01/28/2010 1:19 AM
    This is scary. I have never thought about it before but with improvements in technology, carriers wll be able to view roofs from the home office. This will eliminate the most damaged zip codes in a CAT and many of the IAs. This is troubling.
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    dnjsdad
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    01/28/2010 2:46 AM

    Here are my two cents for what its worth.  The business is evolving.  Change is nothing to worry about if you embrace it.  For so long adjusters just turned and burned, now carriers are concerned with customer service, because that has alot to do with customer retention.   So take care of the insured and embrace the change because those who do these two things can have a long profitable career. 

    I may take more time per file then some, but I am still out scoping everyday.

    Dnjsdad

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    Ray Hall
    Posts:2443


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    01/28/2010 5:16 PM

    Boonabee, this is not something new to insurance carriers. When I started in 1957 we would go out and find where the hail started and stopped. We would pull all the daily reports(copy of the policy in the district office) by ZIP code. When several storm troopers got into town we would give the most complex (big $) to the best adjuster in the hardest zip code. And so forth. We would also pull the fringe and send the nephew or son of the old timer out to "check these roofs"  If DFW was hailed out tonight. At daylight in the morning 20 very good adjusters could check the whole metro area by dark and set the reserves and call the Pilots, Ebrels and so forth and they show is up and ggoing by Saturday.

    Now the bad news use old files and the tech. that is available and have these 20 call 5 of their best  thats 120 people who never get on a roof, but settle thousands of claims 7 days a week. Thats the job you neetd to get lined up for.

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    Olegred
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    01/30/2010 3:44 PM
    I love this new service. I get on the roof, circle the hits, then get to my car pull my laptop, press a few buttons and next day the diagram is ready. For 23 bucks! WoW! I am not sure how accurate they are overall, but the ones I've seen so far are not too bad. :)
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    Leland
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    01/31/2010 12:42 AM
    The economics of technology advances and the labor market works like this:

    When the technology (tools) is expensive or unavailable, the employer needs more people to do the grunt work.

    When the technology is adopted there are several shifts:

    1) fewer people are needed (this is the most obvious change)
    2) the organizational pyramid steepens (instead of 15 supervisors over 150 workers (10 each) you might have 10 supervisors over 7o people (7 each)
    3) with the help of the software or other tool each worker will do not only MORE work, but MORE ACCURATE WORK, FASTER and also will be expected to put more high level thinking into the work product. In other words, the computer is doing more of the drudgery and the worker has to be more skilled in the things that the supervisor used to take care of for him. Also because fewer workers are needed the employer will be able to choose from the better skilled workers for the positions that are left.

    Just think about old movies were they had a giant room full of typists. The typists weren't paid to think, just to type. Nowadays a secretary can use all kinds of technology (which takes care of a lot of the typing and filing) but needs to be more skilled in various business aspects.

    Same for adjusters. With technology the companies won't need adjusters that are good at measuring roofs quickly and accurately, or at least they won't need as many of them.

    The companies will more likely need adjusters with better people skills, or more some kind of skill that the technology doesn't (yet) provide, like speaking a foreign language.

    Just think about it: if there is a market place where 1000 adjusters are need and 1000 are available, and then next year with technology only 800 adjusters are needed, who is the carrier going to keep?

    1) only the most experienced
    2) Ones that have good people skills
    3) ones better at following orders or ranking higher on a test, or having more licenses or certifications
    4) ones that speak other languages or have special training (rope & harness, mold, asbestos, time element, muti-line experience, etc etc.

    If you are very good at something the computer can do and you bring nothing else to the table you will not be competitive in the job market.
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    Ray Hall
    Posts:2443


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    01/31/2010 4:37 PM

    Great post Leland, do you know of an catastrophe adjusters school that can teach people skills and cram 5 years into 3 days ? I don`t.

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    Olegred
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    02/01/2010 6:37 PM
    Hell. yeah, computer is not going to explain coverage to insured, fight that contractor over whether there is damage, plan my day, drive my car, and all that. It's just a useful tool. And I agree, the work is being shifted to smarter, more productive and professional guys, let's hope I will be one of them :)
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    Buford Gonzales
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    10/13/2011 10:15 AM
    This is a follow up to a previous comment I made here last year.

    I've used Geo and Eagle this year. These were both wrong. They don't take in the variables for different pitch and often cannot see through foliage. I've been sent out, for a very small fee I might add, to re measure roofs and correct others estimates all year long. The roofers swear by Eagle, then admit to being paid for twice the squares on several roofs. Good adjusters are hard to beat if you want to save money on a claim. Just saying.
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