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Last Post 10/15/2009 10:59 PM by  Ed Bailey
How long does it taske for mold to form on a wood baseboard
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nyjojo
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10/09/2009 10:02 PM

    I have been trying to find information on how long it takes for mold to form on a wooden baseboard. The water leak was under a tub and seeped through the baseboard. The tenant noticed a little bit of water every day but assumed it was from his 2 children under 5 yrs splashing water while taking a bath. Once he noticed black mold forming on the outside of the fnc b he notified the owner. I have tried to find some documentation from an engineers report or something else to support it but I have been unsuccessful. Any thoughts are greatly appreciated !

    BobH
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    10/09/2009 10:30 PM
    Posted By nyjojo on 09 Oct 2009 10:02 PM

    The tenant noticed a little bit of water every day but assumed...

    The key is to politely interview him and NAIL DOWN WHEN SOMETHING CHANGED in terms of becoming aware of more water there than typical.

    That is the only way you are going to find an answer for that house, that baseboard.  People tend to avoid specifics, but if you persist and vary what you are asking a bit and keep them talking, the truth will come out.

    You will read from the "mold is gold" crowd that "killer mold" can start within 48 hours or whatever, but there are so many variables in terms of temperature, the food source (wood, paper, it needs food, it doesn't grow on glass for example).

    Another large clue in these type of issues would be if it is:

    1) a pressure line, constant leak 24/7 and tends to get noticed before too long

    2) drain line leak that only occurs when water has been flushed, shower taken, dishwasher ran, etc.  Some slab leaks are like that, a slow death that only happens when water runs, and when it is discovered the back-side of the carpet looks like burnt toast.  Your tub may be oozing water only when that tub is used, in which case the issue could have been going on for many months.  Best if the resident says when a change was noticed, so they don't crucify you for your presumptions.

    Bob H
    Ed Bailey
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    10/10/2009 9:28 PM
    Mold can form as soon as 48 hours after the baseboard or other material gets wet and stays wet. If the baseboard is wet, it is likely that water has wicked into the sheetrock paper and if the sheetrock is not green (for wet areas) the rock itself may be saturated. Any good remediation company can test for the moisture level in the affected areas. This will help you determine a prudent plan.
    Here is some general information. Black is just one of many colors that mold can take. Mold is not usually toxic. Black is not any more or less likely to become toxic than any other color mold. There are dozens of mold varieties. The most common microbial that we find in homes is Stachybotrys but is is no more likely to be a health hazard than most others.Though less common, Aspergillis Penicillus spores can survive in the lungs. That can cause more problems, especially if the person has allergies that cause a harsh reaction.
    Mold can produce mycotoxins. These allergens can affect the resperation of people who have high sensativity to mold. An N-95 face mask is usually sufficient to filter out mold spores.
    Joeblack
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    10/11/2009 10:56 AM

    I think the time for visible mold to form on the outside of painted baseboard would vary with the circumstances of the loss (how much water is released each time, how long is it released for, how long it stays wet, what is the temperature/humidity in that area, etc). It may take six days, six weeks, or six months for black stains to form. And I say "black stains" because how would anybody know if its mold unless it's tested. And all that just goes to the cause of the black stains. Then you have the size of the stained area to consider, and the insured's and tenants reaction to the stains. Are they greatly upset over the stains, or is it no big deal to them. Then you have the policy language to deal with. And finally a game plan to get it repaired properly. Good luck!

     

     

    nyjojo
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    10/11/2009 12:22 PM
    I appreciate everyone's response and hopefully this will help me resolve this with the carrier.
    Ray Hall
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    10/11/2009 7:46 PM

    I don,t think I have ever seen mold on base sooner than 10-12 days. I have seen a lot of soft pine base have a black botton around showers and tubs, usally with a shower curtain. An old trick of good billers is selective photos of scope(all close up without any over all or enough determine)

    okclarryd
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    10/11/2009 7:56 PM
    I takes 1 month, 13 days, 9 hours and 25 minutes for mold to form on a wood base board.

    That's with a 74% humidity index and an average temp of 86 degrees.

    No scientific or empirical data, just 'cause I said so.

    Did you know that 87.49% of all percentages are made up on the spot?

    Happy Trails

    Larry D Hardin
    Ray Hall
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    10/11/2009 8:09 PM
    I have worked a few flood claim that had extensive water damage thru the roof or a broken supply line and the house was vacant. The owner thinks closing it up and turning on the heat will dry it out, or just thinks closing it up with out air or heat it will dry out on its own. Wrong my rule is always if it is squish-squish and less than $25.00 per yard in place its all in the dumpster. If its $100. per yard double glued in a hotel or office building call the water suckers as the wool will clean up and can be saved. Just do not leave any steel, iron on the carpet overnight. I saw mold on the dry wall 4 deet high if its not dryed out be removable of the carpet. I saw a NFIP flood loss in Sacramento that was managed by a realtor on a vacant house. The realtor ledt the windows open but turned on the furnace. I looked like Carlsbad Caverns from the top and bottom when the old flood adjuster got to inspect.

    Its petty good subrogation when the water suckers leave a steel fan or dehume on wool carpet that leaves rust stains
    Ray Hall
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    10/11/2009 8:19 PM

    Larry.... my goodness you sound jaded like some of the old adjusters posting on this site. I,m not sure you are accurate and I never give an opinion as my wife has to review my opine's first, but she has been busy doing her own thing for several year..thats why I hasve been kinda quite.

    Ed Bailey
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    10/15/2009 10:59 PM

    nyjojo, Your username implies that you may be from New York. The New York Department of Health's "Guidelines on Assessment and Remediation of Fungi in Indoor Environments" provides all of the information that you need to answer questions about mold. This document, and those by the EPA are generally held to be the most reliable by AIHA and ELLAP accredited forensics professionals.

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