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Last Post 07/19/2018 8:48 AM by  IAPATH
State Farm
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mikt
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02/11/2009 7:35 PM
    Hoping you guys and gals could help with a little info?
     

    I am looking to get some information about working for State Farm as a staff Cat Adjuster.  I have a couple of months doing claims under my belt.  So being new to the adjuster side of things, I thought that by working for a carrier I may have more opportunity for training and etc.  I have searched their website and cannot seem to find any info on open jobs as an adjuster. Does anyone have any info as where to look or start? I am from MN if that matters?? Thanks for the help

     

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    moco
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    02/11/2009 10:30 PM

     Not sure, but i believe that State Farm Cat Staff team is composed of already seasoned (State Farm employed Adjuster's). Hiring on as one will likley be impossible for an IA with years of experience, much more difficult with your experience level. Good luck to you though. 

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    wbrmark
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    02/19/2009 12:16 PM
    Speak with a State Farm company adjuster, they will give you the info. Most company's require minimum 4 years experience.
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    Medulus
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    02/19/2009 2:14 PM
    As a former State Farm claim rep, I can speak to how it used to be. Do not take this as gospel for what I like to call (sometimes with scorn) "The New State Farm".

    In years past, State Farm actually preferred to hire claim reps with little or no experience so they could be taught "the State Farm way". Again, in years past, soon after they hired someone, they sent that person to a two to three week State Farm Claim School that was very intensive and an excellent claim school. The last time I worked alongside a State Farm catastrophe team they were far from seasoned and experienced professionals.
    Many of the cat team "reinspector/trainers" had State Farm Claim School (which I admit is excellent) and little more to their credit. Being myself a graduate of said school, I could sometimes explain the coverage to the "reinspector/trainers", and sometimes I just was unable to assist them to "get it".  I remember well the time the tornado blew an object against a wall without making a hole in the wall, and it knocked over a television up against the inside of the wall.  The cat supervisor was an auto supervisor who wanted to do something different for a change and the "reinspector/trainer" was a recent claim school graduate.  The supervisor saw I was recommending a payment on a content item inside the home with no hole in the wall.  The "reinspector/trainer" also knew next to nothing.  Between them they took me to task.  No amount of explaining that the hole in the wall provision only applied if the television was damaged by rain, snow, sleet, sand, or dust could prevail against this dim duo.  Oh well, that's water ten years ago under the bridge.  I did get the insured paid for the television, but not without the help of my vendor cat supervisor explaining their policy to them as well.

    So, it's worth a try to get on with State Farm. They will train you and you will meet some of the truly good people who work for them. Just don't assume that everyone knows what they are doing, and you should be alright.

    If you cannot find employment opportunities on their website, I would start by contacting the nearest State Farm agent and tell them what you want to do. If they cannot help you, they can direct you to the regional office where the human resources department should be able to point you in the right direction.
    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
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    wbrmark
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    02/20/2009 9:57 AM
    Thats some good info Steve. I should have been more specific about the 4 years experience needed by most companies. The State Farm CAT team may be unique in they do actually prefer to train you from scratch. The SF trainers told us in briefing prior to hitting the ground with Ike that those of us that have no backgrounds in building or contracting are the perfect candidates for SF CAT work since they can teach us what we need to know from scratch, we don't have any prior knowledge that would corrupt their processing of claims.
     
    Needless to say I survived my first CAT and await deployment again. I am spending my "off time" reading and gaining knowledge to help me when the next storm hits. I have to admit that without the help from 2 or 3 very seasoned and knowledgable adjusters- I would have failed miserably.
     
     So, if you are a new adjuster reading this take heed to all the advice thrown around on this forum. 
    If you are a seasoned adjuster, thank you for being here.
    And thanks to the troops for allowing us to read this in English.
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    Dimechimes
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    03/10/2009 2:15 AM
    Steve, great points you make. I had to laugh in my last Fundamentals class when someone (may have been Ray-Trader) said that they had a file rejected because they had crown molding in their estimate and the claims examiner at the carrier rejected their file because mold wasn't covered. It is just amazing what is going on these days. I think insurance consumers might use another word for it.
    Visit our Adjusters Information Blog
    www.dimechimes.wordpress.com www.Linkedin.com/in/dimechimesclaimSmentor www.Twitter.com/ClaimSmentor www.ClaimSmentor.com
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    QuickHEMI
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    03/12/2009 11:11 AM
    I have it from an EXCELLENT source that SF is downsizing their # of staff catastrophe adjusters. They are however raising the number of trainers and managers. "State Farm looks forward to increased participation from their independent adjusting partners."
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    stormcrow
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    03/12/2009 11:32 PM
      the CIRCLE OF LIFE
    I want to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like his passengers.
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    HuskerCat
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    03/13/2009 4:07 AM
    Dirt...are you trying to say "which bean-counter is in charge next week", and then it's back to less IA's?  Hakuna matata! (in keeping with your circle of life theme).
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    Ray Hall
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    03/13/2009 10:03 PM
    When I was a non traveling IA from about 57to 90 I worked for several IA,s that worked SF overflow. It was good losses also. Not the one shot loss,s that can be worked from a desck, but needed eye balls.  After Christmas  we would get the word we would be cut of after the first of the years as well as the other 2 or 3 IA working their overflowworking  in the Houston Area.  We would get cut back on by Valentine Day as well as our competor.
     
    State farm will never cut off GOOD IA Vendors, just always make sure you measure up, and let them know, you know they "thought of it".If yau are a catastrophe asjuster get on with a State Frm, Allstate, Darmers, USAA, Natiowide, Citizens , St, Paul-Travelers, Zurich or TWIA. I THINK all these vendors have a temp. wmployee contract and furnish E & O defense coverage.
     
     
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    IAPATH
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    07/19/2018 8:48 AM
    Obviously this thread is very old, but it shows up highly in the Google search engines so I thought I'd add some information here.
    State Farm does use IA Firms for overflow claims. I believe there is 11 companies services State Farm with cat contracts currently (I don't know all of them) but below is who I do know.

    TheBestIRS
    Pilot Catastrophe
    Worley Cat
    EA Renfroe
    CNC Aadjusting
    QA Claims
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