Tags - Popular | FAQ  

PrevPrev Go to previous topic
NextNext Go to next topic
Last Post 12/01/2006 12:16 PM by  Janice R. Martin-Toll
help please! - Getting Started
 12 Replies
Sort:
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages
mas8611
Guest
Guest
Posts:3


--
10/30/2006 4:06 PM

    Hi all,  I am currently a Realtor in central Florida and recently met a man that was a catastrophe adjuster from n.c.  After a lengthy conversation the gentleman had me intrigued to look into this line of work.  He told me that one could make well over six figures a year working 6-8 months out of that year.

    I have no construction experience which i understand is important.

    My questions are

    1. is there really that kind of money to be made in the profession ?

    2. what can a new adjuster expect for first year(income) ( work)?

    3. how difficult is it for a new person to get work?

    4. is the lack of construction experience a problem?

    5.  How do I do about getting started and what start up costs are there associated with this work?

    Any help would be much appreciated....i have been having trouble finding licensing info for Florida such as classes and requirements.  I would like to look into a career here because it should allow me enough free time to still pursue some real estate endeavors.

    Thanks ....Matt Silcox Realtor  386 295 5719



    0
    host
    CatAdjuster.org Founder
    Posts:708


    --
    10/30/2006 6:22 PM
    [QUOTE]mas8611 wrote

    Hi all,  I am currently a realtor in central florida and recently met a man that was a catastrophe adjuster from n.c.  After a lengthy conversation the gentleman had me intrigued to look into this line of work.  He told me that one could make well over six figures a year working 6-8 months out of that year.

    I have no construction experience which i understand is important.

    My questions are

    1. is there really that kind of money to be made in the profession ?

    2. what can a new adjuster expect for first year(income) ( work)?

    3. how difficult is it for a new person to get work?

    4. is the lack of construction experience a problem?

    5.  How do I do about getting started and what start up costs are there associated with this work?

    Any help would be much appreciated....i have been having trouble finding liscensing info for Florida such as classes and requirements.  I would like to look into a career here because it should allow me enough free time to still pursue some real estate endeavors.

    Thanks ....Matt Silcox Realtor  386 295 5719

    [/QUOTE]

    Matt,

    Here are some links to some topics in the forum archives that may be of help.

     

    You can visit this page for Florida License information.

    I have provided my answers and thoughts below.

    1. is there really that kind of money to be made in the profession ?

                    A good income is possible, however there are a lot of variables in this business, for example during the 2005 season I’m aware of some first year adjusters that worked on the same storm, had the same kind of files, same kind of training, same kind of support and same kind of equipment but had incomes ranging from negative amounts (IA’s have to paid their own expenses on most assignments) to near the six figure income you heard about.  Most were surprise that they were done in three – four weeks and heading home.  A lot of them never worked again in this industry.  This has heavily talk about in the following thread, How much can I really make 257 replies.

    2. what can a new adjuster expect for first year(income) ( work)?

                    In today’s market I would plan on both of them being scarce, you may need to work for free just to get started. Some compaies currently are not hiring any new adjusters and others have raised their experience requirements from 1 year to 5 years.

    3. how difficult is it for a new person to get work?

     In years of little or no major events it is going to be hard.

    4. is the lack of construction experience a problem?

        It can be a problem, but lack of any claim handling experience is a bigger problem

    5.       How do I go about getting started and what start up costs are there associated with this work?

    Find someone that is successful in the industry, buddy up with them for a while, carry the ladder and hold the tape for them.  Basically you want to become their shadow and take notes and listen well.  claimsmentor.com has a mentor program that may be of interest. Here a thread in the archives that discuss the start-up cost.

    0
    host
    CatAdjuster.org Founder
    Posts:708


    --
    10/30/2006 7:33 PM

    Forum Transfer:

    Post made by Tom Toll

    Matt, no one can foresee what income any of us will have in a given year. Many will not survive this year as it has been very bleak for many. Newbies are very susceptible to drowning in this sea of claims. No catastrophes= no work=no income. Those who make good livings in this business have been adjusters for many years and have many contacts. They must know construction, policy interpretation, be computer literate, skilled at photography, understanding the psyhchology of what an insured goes through, and many other skills that only experience and a lot of studying can bring. Those that brag about the amounts of money they make usually are not telling the truth. Expenses in this profession are very high, thusly offsetting gross income considerably.

    Vale Tech is the first consideration. They have one of the best programs for an adjuster to learn, but of course, that is just the very begining. You then must get experience, and hopefully it will not be at the expense of an insured. You need a laptop, camera, measuring equipment, estimating program, ladder, and many other tools of the trade. Unless you can dedicate yourself to this profession, stay at what you are doing. Not knowing how to properly adjust a  loss is a disservice to yourself and your insured. Give it some very serious thought before entering this business.

    0
    host
    CatAdjuster.org Founder
    Posts:708


    --
    10/30/2006 7:40 PM

    Forum Transfer:

    Posted By Jim Gary:

    Well put Mr Toll, Just to through my 2 cents in, I had been a staff adjuster for 3 years, thought I would go right out. It took me 18 months before getting called to my first storm. Luckily I was able to scrounge day work and odd jobs to survive. Not an easy proffession to break into. And the slow time can be a deal breaker if your not prepared for extended period of  NO INCOME.

    0
    cantonking
    Member
    Member
    Posts:60


    --
    10/30/2006 10:54 PM

    hi my name is chester thompson i recieve my texas P&C licenese. I want to become a full time adjusters, i want to get a all my certification, and AIC. here is my questions. can be a  full-time adjuster with out being a staff? where do go to get you earthquake and hail certification? how hard to become a staff adjuster ( progressive state farm allstate) any infomation will be helpful

     

    Tom, Roy and Steve

    Why do you continue to entertain these post from people wanting to get started.

    You can't help someone that won't help themself. If this guy cant find all the other post on this subject that is already saturated on this site then he is to lazy to search it out for himself.

    Ya'll continue to elaborate and expound on the subject -just say go to this thread and be done.

    Ya'll are inviting the same ridicule that was experienced before and be it well deserved.

    It is obvious he wants in for the fast money. Ya'll encourage this or else you would say find a staff position with a carrier.

    Tell these guys that the newbies that worked their first storm last year didnt make much and that in 2006 they will make $0 dollars US. 

    If they are lucky due to attrition the newbie may be able to pick up a hail storm in the Spring 2007 and maybe we will have a hurricane in the summer.

    If you have no experience you may not see any work until the summer of 2008.

     

    If you dont have your license, certs, xactimate, integriclaim and storm experience and the nest egg to ride the dry spell it is over.

    If you want in now it is to late.

    Larry Regan

    0
    ecovill
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:14


    --
    10/31/2006 11:47 AM
    Well said Cantonking. It needs to be stressed , adjusters will not be deployed unless there is a disaster on the order of Katrina/Rita. Adjusting companies already have many adjusters available and they are going to be the first ones called to a storm. No major storms in 2006, so most adjusters are having an extended vacation.
    0
    Jud G.
    Advanced Member
    Advanced Member
    Posts:509


    --
    10/31/2006 12:25 PM

    This thread just goes to show that the matter of Income (regardless of industry) is such a timeless and sensitive topic.  The Catastrophe Adjusting Occupation is such a strange and ever changing niche of the Insurance Industry. 

    This past hurricane season (I consider 2006 as over regardless of what those weathermen say) has been the epiphany of the separation of wheat and chaff.  Unfortunately, there's going to be a lot of good quality wheat gone with the mountains of chaff.

    Does experience in Xactimate, IntegriClaim increase your chances?  Do you need a reciprocal state License? Do you need extensive construction and policy training?  Do you need certifications from the top five Insurance Co.'s?  Do you need an EQ certification?  Do you need experience?  Yes and no. 

    I know a flood adjuster who got off to a great start with just a Simsol subscription, a good mentor, small car, and a good credit card.  He had no ladder, no license, no cash, and no training.  Five years later (2005), he was in the top two adjusters for a medium sized flood claims vendor.

    My point is that there is no magic formula required to make it in this gig.  The right attitude and knowing the right person seems to be the quickest way to start getting claims.  The above example happens to less than one percent of those who try to make it in this business.  The description Larry Regan gave is a very methodical and mainstream method.  Even then, the guarantees are slim to none.

    0
    host
    CatAdjuster.org Founder
    Posts:708


    --
    10/31/2006 1:45 PM
    Larry, would your suggestion be to delete the next post of this type? Would we not receive ridicule or be accused of censorship if we deleted or locked this thread instead?  This is one reason we have two separate areas here on CADO, for those visitors that get upset when they see a post of this nature or repeated posts asking a question that has been answered in the past  we offer the "Catastrophe Central" forums where we will not allow post of this type to remain active and work hard to make sure that it remains on the technical side of our industry.  One reason that I (and if you wish to blame someone blame me since I own this site) allowed this post in this forum was so I could point all new visitors that may be unaware that we even have a archive to the archives and a post in this forum to point visitors to.   BTW, aren't you just as guilty of elaborating and expounding on the subject, you could have just ended your post with the sentence " Ya'll are inviting the same ridicule that was experienced before and be it well deserved."   I learned a long time ago that I could not please everyone with my efforts on CADO.  
    0
    host
    CatAdjuster.org Founder
    Posts:708


    --
    10/31/2006 11:32 PM

    Matt,

    Here is a post that was made to another poster asking almost the same question but it seems to be pretty good advise and worth sharing again.  It was first posted by zebraman on 9/29/2002.  (click for the original post)

    "" 

    If I May....
    Let me throw out my past to perhaps help you a little.
    I was an Investigator at the Public Defender's Office in Portland, OR.
    I wanted to get into insurance adjusting because most of my investigative skills transfered and the caliber of people I would deal with would improve (however marginally).
    I was counseled by a gray haired claims guy. I have followed his advice to the letter.
    First, be careful who you start with. He advised one of the big three (Snake Farm, All(most)State, or Farmers. He also said to make sure that I would be given a chance to train as a multi-line adjuster. Most of the bigger companies will try to 'pigeonhole' you and put and keep you in a specific claims discipline. Only Farmers offered the opportunity to be Multi-line. They hired me as an auto adjuster. While I was in training, there was an opening for a multi-line resident adjuster in Central Oregon. I was given the opportunity to cross-train in 3 weeks. I rode with a liability adjuster and a property adjuster for 1 week each. I was thrown out in the field with a draft pad, a small clue, and thick skin. I made a lot of brain farts. My Supervisor told me to drive on and learn. I did.
    So, the first part of the gray head's advice had been taken. He also advised me to jump with both feet at every training opportunity. I did. I went to every possible school or clinic. I joined the local adjuster's association. Took I-CAR. Took AIC and General Insurance classes. Also, I networked like crazy. When a local adjuster needed help, I lent a hand. We are a breed that takes care of our own. When a local body guy went on vacation or was sick, I helped out with admin. work or estimate writing. Spent a little time lending hands to contractors and cleaning guys. Learned a lot.
    Next my grey haired friend told me that after about 5 years, I should go to a small mutual to learn how companies operate in their claims and management philosophy. I left Big FIG after 10.
    Now, as a supervisor, I get calls from people like you about once a week. Here's what I will tell you.
    Show your prospective employer how much get-up-and-go you have. Make yourself so that when someone in a claims department looks at you they know that you will immediately improve their bottom line. Don't wait for training. Go find it. Offer to ride with an adjuster you know. It may mean that you lose a week of vacation. It may be that you lose the vacation but decide that the profession isn't for you. Small price to pay. Seek out the local adjuster association. Collect business cards. Find out where adjusters meet for coffee or lunch.
    I remember a neat lady who wanted to get into adjusting in the worst way. I was supervising a claims office for FIG in Sioux Falls, SD. She passed the JEPS (it's an aptitude test) with flying colors. She interviewed with gusto. My local manager was an old-line mysoginist. I knew he wouldn't go for her. To me, she was money in the bank. The manager told me, "I don't know about hiring women for this job." It was time to put my thingie on the table. I told him, "If she gets passed over for this job, and I get subpoenaed to testify, your remark will wind up in court." She was hired. As I suspected, she did the work of two men. Regional inspectors couldn't believe that this little woman could wrestle a laddr up to a roof and write a hail estimate. When they went out to look at their work to see if she was doing it right, they found where she had initialed and dated a roof vent with a grease pencil to prove she had been there! Best hire I ever made.
    So, Chantal, you want in. It's a neat profession if you have the aptitude. You see people at their ugliest and best. You make a lot of good, solid friends. You get the satisfaction of moving a lot of paper from one side of your desk to the other (that's a joke, by the way).
    Do a little personal homework. Make some contacts and do the 'camel's nose under the tent' thing. Once you're in, you're in.
    Good luck.

    0
    mas8611
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:3


    --
    11/01/2006 9:43 PM

    Just wanted to trhank everyone for the insight ..I appreciate your time

     

    matt

    0
    Cindy Jones
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:3


    --
    11/30/2006 7:08 PM

    First, I know a lot of new adjusters who made good money last year.

    Second, sure, this year has been slow with no major storms, but the big storms won't stay away for long. They always come back. And for those who are looking to get into this business, it's best to be prepared for when they do. Learn the skills you need now. Get certified and do all relevant research. Then when the next big storm hits, off you go.

    Cindy

     

    0
    stormcrow
    Member
    Member
    Posts:437


    --
    12/01/2006 12:05 PM
    Cindy, why do you not show up in the Texas DOI database? After reading your infomercial website, if you are an adjuster, you are a true embaressment to the industry. The dumbing down of our industry continues, sigh.
    I want to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like his passengers.
    0
    Janice R. Martin-Toll
    Life Member
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:35


    --
    12/01/2006 12:16 PM

    Maybe "Cindy" uses a different (real) name with Texas DOI.  Maybe "Cynthia".

    Janice R. Martin-Toll
    0
    You are not authorized to post a reply.


    These Forums are dedicated to discussion of Claims Adjusting.

    For the benefit of the community and to protect the integrity of the ecosystem, please observe the following posting guidelines: 
    • No Advertising. 
    • No vendor trolling / poaching. If someone posts about a vendor issue, allow the vendor or others to respond. Any post that looks like trolling / poaching will be removed.
    • No Flaming or Trolling.
    • No Profanity, Racism, or Prejudice.
    • Terms of Use Apply

      Site Moderators have the final word on approving / removing a thread or post or comment.