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Last Post 03/29/2007 10:41 AM by  Jud G.
US Staffing Adjusting Services
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USCatAdjuster
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03/11/2007 12:40 PM
    I recently spent 3 weeks at the US Staffing Adjusting Service training facility. I enrolled in their "Surviving the Storm, Adjusting 101", Xactimate I, Xactimate II Advanced Sketch and Texas All-Lines Pre-Licensing courses. From the moment I arrived, I was welcomed with open arms. The training in the 101 course was great. We covered everything from how to set up for deployment, what do do once you are there and how to scope, report and estimate damages. This four day course is a MUST for all new adjusters. The classroom setting is professional, but relaxed. It is taught by seasoned instructors that really know the ins and outs of adjusting. By the time you leave this class, you will feel like you are ready to be deployed. You are not. There is so much more to know. Beginning on my fifth day, I hit the Xactimate I course. This three day course is designed to introduce you to the basics of the  Xactimate program. Setting up a claim, entering line items, completing a claim and having it ready to send to the carrier. Once this class is finished, you will be able to create an Xactimate report of your scope. Top notch, informed instructors with the patience of Job make this a great course. This is a three day course. Beginning Day eight, I started the Xactimate II class. This is where it really gets interesting. Sketch is Xactimate on steroids! This program is SO powerful. It literally will cut your report time in half. It is an intense four days. There is a lot of information to digest, but once you work with it and become familiar with the features of this program, you will streamline your work, and close more claims. Closing more claims means what? MORE MONEY!

    After twelve straight days, I admit, I was ready for a break and I got one at the end of week two. The Texas All-Lines Pre-Licensing class didn't start until after the weekend. After resting, I was ready to go on Monday morning. This class is taught by two people that have a combined 60+ years of experience in the Insurance industry. To say that these guys knew their stuff would be understatement.  This is a five day course that covers everything you will ever need to know to be an effective adjuster. Understanding policies is the backbone of what we do. I left this class with a confidence I didn't know I could have. I am ready. Bring on the storms!

    My experience at US Staffing was absolutely outstanding. Leaving was a little bitter-sweet as I truly felt like a family member while I was there, which is saying a lot since this company is family owned. The owner, Mickey Hamilton, actually teaches a course from time to time. He is always there and takes a real interest in what is happening with the students, their thoughts, and their progress.

    I researched my choice of schools carefully, and couldn't have made a better choice. Many thanks to my new US Staffing "Family."

    Todd O'Meara
    catadjuster1@gmail.com
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    Tom Toll
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    03/11/2007 2:14 PM
    I am glad you had such a wonderful experience. I am in hopes more newbies take advantage of this offer of schooling. Sounds like a winner and a lot of good people in place to teach what adjusters need to know. Good report.

    You might put up their web site so others can go there to get information.
    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.
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    Steve G
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    03/27/2007 12:16 AM
    I was interested to see what you had to say about US Staffing.  Have you been able to pick up much work from them after completing their course?  I have been in touch with them and they are wanting me to register for next week's class.   I have been handling claims for about 8 years now and am trying to decide whether I want to go through them for the course, or look into taking the course/test online.  Any input would be appreciated.  Thanks.
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    USCatAdjuster
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    03/27/2007 9:05 AM
    SteveG, as of yet, I have not received any work form them. I remain confident, however, that I will. I am curious, if you have been adjusting for 8 years, what do you hope to get from training? Do you not have your Texas All Lines license? If that is what you are looking for, I had a great experience with the instructors there.
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    USCatAdjuster
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    03/27/2007 9:20 AM
    Get all of the information at: www.usstaffingadj.com 
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    Steve G
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    03/27/2007 9:35 AM
    Thanks for your prompt reply to my query, USCatAdjuster. And you're right, I do not have my Texas license yet. That is because I have been able to get by without it so far, working mostly here in LA where my first 6 years before Katrina were as local staff adjuster. There are cheaper and more convenient ways for me to get the license since I need the piece of paper more than the actual training, but I was considering using them for the course if that meant it would give me a leg up in getting some work for them during this slow period.
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    cantonking
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    03/27/2007 10:29 AM
    Steve G.
    Reality check. If they had enough work to go around you would still be on the bottom of the list with USCatadjuster. Maybe a little higher up with 8 years exp. How many have taken their course in the past year? A 1,000 or more???? It is evident their ad is a little deceptive. You and USCat think they will start giving you work right away.

    If you take the 150 question test online you have to pass it on your own which may be difficult. If you take one of these courses they give you all the answers
    and it is no fail as long as your body is warm when you take it.
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    USCatAdjuster
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    03/27/2007 10:51 AM
    Alright, King.....do tell. How does a "newbie" like me get work. I am all ears. Instead of insinuatiing that I am delusional, how about a little advice?
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    tejasjayb
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    03/27/2007 3:13 PM
    a little advice? ........... 1. Send resumes to as many adjusting firms as you can identify.... 2. Ask questions of any firm that wants you on their roster (a) what carriers do they contract with? (b) ask how many cat claims, by year, have they been assigned in the last 5 years? .... 3. Research yourself who the major carriers are and attempt to align yourself with the firms that handle the majority of the claims in the lower 48 ..... 4. Be prepared for a long wait. Most major IA firms want 3-5 years experience..... 5. There are scores of start-up IA firms in the last 3 years. Many are looking for client business themselves. Realize that many of the newer firms actually employ a small number of "core" adjusters.... 6. Hope that this fall numerous hurricanes hit the U.S. coastline in highly populated areas............ 7. always have 12 months living expenses held back in reserve, or stay close to your daytime job....
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    cantonking
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    03/27/2007 4:32 PM
     

    USCat,

     

    If you want my advice I have prior post filled with advice. However, you seem to be more intelligent than most as evidenced by a few big words even though one is misspelled. I will give you some restrained thoughts.

     

    As a Catadjuster you are an Entrepreneur. You own your own business. You are self employed. You are the one responsible for income that comes to your business and how much. This is a totally different thought process from having a job. You are supposed to be the one with the answers. If your name is on a roster that mine is then you are my competition. Educate yourself to find your own answers and then ask for advice. Did you ask at the training school that you paid big bucks for how do you get work? Why don’t they teach this as part of the curriculum?  The answer to that question would have been worth what you paid.

     

    This is not a job where you see how little you can do to pick up a paycheck every other week.

     

    Free Advice:

     

    (1)    Read everything you can in the archives of Catadjuster.org... The answers to your         questions are there. It is up to you to find them.

     

          (2) Go to Claimsmentor.com; They are geared to helping the newbie.

     

          (3) Go to free conferences and seminars given by IA firms. In the past year I have gotten over 50 hrs of CE credits, Carrier certifications, earthquake, wind and NFIP for free. For example: ICA is putting on a seminar next week. Free NFIP cert., other good CE courses and 2 days Xactimate training ($200-$300 Value). Free excellent lunch (3 days) at 5 Star Hotel.  400-600 adjusters to network with. When you see this many adjusters together at one time you realize that you are in competition for the work that does come available. I went last year and it was very worthwhile.

    (4)  Network with anyone and everything. Establish relationships.

     (5) During the impending hail season???? (Could this be a year without hail?) make your self available as an apprentice to an experienced adjuster without remuneration.  This would be worth more than any training school you would pay big bucks for. Experience is the best teacher. You might be able to connect with the IA firm he or she is working for.

    If you are already doing these things then you have a chance just keep digging and educate yourself. If you are not doing these things then you are clueless and had better find a job.

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    USCatAdjuster
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    03/27/2007 7:18 PM
    King,

    Thanks for the input; it confirms that I am doing all of the right things. I just might have a chance.
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    AJfromSA
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    03/28/2007 9:35 PM
    Tejasjayb and CantonKing, you both have provided some great advice for USCatAdjuster. I'm hoping you can give me some advice. I have been an inside claims adjuster since 1995 and am considering becoming a CAT Adjuster. There are a number or reasons for wanting to make the transition. I will list the most pertinant... 1- would like to get out the office as I currently sit at a desk 8 hours/day. 2- I like the idea of owning my time. (I understand that there isn't compelete control as one has to work when the catastrophe hits). 3- I understand you can make some pretty decent money when you are working although the days are long. I am hoping that by working hard when the work is available (I've heard 18 hr days), I might be able to take more time off... a couple months instead of just the few weeks I currently get. As I don't have appraising exerience, I know I will need to get some additional training to make the transition. Will my 11 years experience as an inside claim rep help me get my foot in the door? In order to help me make that decision, can you give me some realistic idea of what I might expect... specifically the pros and cons? What to expect the first few years while one is gaining experience and building their reputation. What are some realistic income expectations? Realistic work conditions? What keeps you in this field? Thank you!
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    Jud G.
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    03/29/2007 10:41 AM

    I would suggest getting field property experience in the regular claims arena first.  Wait until you experience a handful of catastrophes as a field adjuster and then make the switch.  Regular claims field experience will make your switch to catastrophe-only claims a much smoother transition.

    Here are a couple of threads that address some of your concerns.  I know you are simply looking for helpful information, but discussions about income on a public forum is not professional, but, as you can see, it has been done...

    "They don't just hand you the keys" http://www.catadjuster.org/forum/tm.asp?m=27675

    "How much can you really make?" http://www.catadjuster.org/forum/tm...3&key=

    Your questions have been answered many times over, so I would suggest searching CADO's forums that people have contributed to since 1995.

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