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Last Post 08/22/2007 5:18 PM by  cajunadj
NFIP Certification
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JimGary
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12/26/2006 4:44 PM
    Whats the value of the NFIP certification. I am attending a certification class next month. I have been a staff adjuster since 2001 but have entered the cat end last year. I have heard different opinion regarding needing or not needing the certification. How about some input from some of you folks that have been doing this for a while. Assuming a competent adjuster, will the certification give someone more assigments, more $$$, more value? I am getting the cert regardless, but was just wanting input from the "experienced" folks out there.

    JWG
    I know the voices aren't real, but sometimes they're right!
    Tags: Flood
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    Medulus
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    12/27/2006 1:36 AM

    Jim,

    You cannot handle NFIP claims without being certified. It is against federal law to do so. You will get in big trouble if you accept NFIP claims without being certified to do so. The class for which you are signed up does not certify you to handle these claims. They are, however, also a requirement in order to handle NFIP claims. I am certified in all areas (Mobile Home, Residential, Condo, Large and Small Commercial claims) by NFIP. It is still required that I attend the presentation each year. After you have attended the presentation, you will need to apply to the NFIP for certification. A minimum of five years claim handling experience is required.* This certification will allow you to work NFIP (flood) claims. Some of the top catadjusting companies in the country work only these claims. Simsol and Colonial Claims come to mind immediately. SCS used to be another, but I have not heard anything about them in quite some time. NFIP claims can be very profitable. They can also be very demanding. You will learn about some of the requirements and pitfalls at the presentation. You will also be eligible for considerable continuing education credit toward the requirements for your state license.

    You may also find that certain claims on a wind and flood event are assigned or reassigned only to those who are certified for flood -- under the "one adjuster" program.


    Even if, like me, you work very few flood claims, this is a good certification to have. It makes you more marketable and provides a backup plan in case (for some reason) you no longer are willing or able to climb roofs. Few flood claims require roof climbing. If you knew what the income of the top flood adjusters was during Hurricane Katrina, you wouldn't even question the value of this certification.  My income was satisfactory during that event, but doesn't even compare to what some of the adjusters handling NFIP claims made.

    *Adjusters with less than five years experience can be conditionally certified. This will be explained better than I can explain it at the NFIP presentation.

    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
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    katadj6
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    12/27/2006 4:01 PM
    You said it all Steve.

    Some of the flood adjusters use well versed "bird dogs" to photograph, footprint and scope the losses when they become overloaded with claims. This allows more closures but one must be absolutely sure of what they are attesting too as the NFIP certification number and your Signature will have to appear on the Final Report.

    If you do not have the knowledge and credentials, as Steve stated, look elsewhere..............................
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    Ray Hall
    Senior Member
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    Posts:2443


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    04/25/2007 11:28 AM

    Wow ,just read in the latest copy of Watermark about NE U.S. is very vulnerable to uninsured flood losses on dwellings. Really shocking. The following is the number of housholds with coverage. Conn. 2.5 %, Deleware 7.1%, Maine 1.5 %, Mass. 1.9%, NH. 1.4%, NJ 6.8%, NY 1.7%, PA.1.3%, RI3.3%, Vt. 1.3%.. Maryland 3.1%

    Whats more shocking is 28% of the  insured dwellings have been flooded before, and the lendors require.

    Floods make a lot of headlines but produce very little work for adjusters, as the uninsured losses are  making the headlines and the one's reported. Thank goodness the CP can have flood coverage added.

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    claims_ray
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    04/25/2007 11:46 AM
    What also makes this a shame is that once someone seeks aid from FEMA for flooding, FEMA purchases flood insurance for the property for up to three years. Then it is the homeowners obligation to purchase it after. If they do not then supposedly FEMA will deny any assistance upon future flooding.
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    Catmannn
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    06/22/2007 10:12 PM
    katadj6,
    If the world was cool then the use of un-licensed, un- trained, un-skilled people to do the work for an adjuster while he/she is at Friday's
    knocking down some coooool ones is CRAP.
    There is always ones that spend time and find short cuts and find ways to get around any system. In questioning that adjuster would not
    be able to answer not a damm questions except the hired a few south of the boarder swimmers to adjust his claim. Maybe the lead swimmer could explain the policy to the insureds.
    Crap is Crap, theft is theft, and the "well vs bird dogs" is crap also.
    I for one would report this abuse of the system .



    Houtz
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    katadj
    Founding Member
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    Posts:256


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    06/24/2007 5:23 PM

    DH,

    All I was referring to is the FACT that in my many, many years of doing this work, i have heard of many firms and individuals that have used "Scopes" to do the inspections, take the photos and even prepare some of the estimates, only to have the "NFIP Certified" adjuster sign off on the file.

    I'm not condoning the actions of any of them. I'm sure that many experienced adjusters have engaged others to preform certain phases of the "adjusting" workplace. Consider, if you will, phone contact, appointment setting/changing/cancelling, file setup, photo mounting (Old days) and photo descriptions.

    Then we have the guys and gals that like to climb and measure and draw pictures.  Well you get it , I'm sure.

    Some things are permissible, constructive, helpful and profitable. The same amount of things are also fraught with potential errors for which the "adjuster" is held accountable. So, to say it simply, "Let your conscience , be your guide"

    "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new... Albert Einstein"
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    claims_ray
    Member
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    Posts:293


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    06/24/2007 11:30 PM
    At the meeting I attended in San Antonio they advised us that all inspections had to be performed by an NFIP certified adjuster.
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    Ray Hall
    Senior Member
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    Posts:2443


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    06/25/2007 1:51 AM

    " All inspections done by a NFIP certified adjuster"   a good rule, but if you take 2 helpers with you it goes MUCH faster and if you get a good puter person it really frees up more time for inspections and discussions with the insureds therefore better-faster service to the policy holder and whats wrong with closing files faster.

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    yumadj
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    08/21/2007 1:30 AM
    I attended 2 annual workshops, then missed this year due to personal considerations. Am I out now until next year when I attend another workshop? I noticed a lot of adjusters worked Katrina with no flood certification under WYO programs. I guess I would not be restricted from working floods as WYO? Anyone have some answers? Thanks in advance.
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    randellmorgan
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    08/22/2007 4:21 PM

    I attended a NFIP class that was part of a state farm certification. The class wasn't put on by NFIP it was done by a State Farm employee. After taking this class I handled mainly wind claims for state farm but did do a handful of NFIP flood claims also. All of this was for Katrina in Louisiana. I didn't receive any paper certification for this class and was wondering if the certification was only valid for state farm and how exactly I was even allowed the certification since I did not have the required 5 years experience.

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    cajunadj
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    08/22/2007 5:18 PM
    The State Farm class was for State Farm only. It was also good for Katrina only. Alot of the rules for NFIP were relaxed partly because of the sheer volume. I do not believe that will ever happen again. If you do not have an NFIP number and are not NFIP certified now, I believe that you will have to have the 5 years verifiable experience to do flood work. It is not 5 year flood experience, but 5 year property experience. I would strongly suggest that you go to one of the vendors conventions and go to the NFIP class put on by NFIP. If you have the verifiable experience, you will get the certification. If not, you won't.
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