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Last Post 11/05/2017 3:14 AM by  adjustingto6figures
Helicopter GoPro?
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Tom Rongstad
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12/06/2013 8:02 PM

    I perform multi-line dailies, therefore; minimal roof inspections have occurred in the past few years. Most of the time, an expert is engaged to do so. However, I have always thought about ways that roof inspections will no longer be needed, once the Eagle View type products entered the market a few years ago. 

    Now, in many years gone past, when I did chase the storms, some of the roofs were very challenging, and there were few options back then. I am talking about the years 1989 - 1995. 

    I just saw the Helicopter GoPro, and did some price comparison and it appears for about $500 to $600, one can be had.

    Now I know this will not "color a roof" i.e. test squares for hail. But for wind events, it could be useful.

    Has this been done by any of you?

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    Jud G.
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    12/06/2013 10:41 PM
    Hey Ron,
    I've got an AR Parrott and it works great when there's no wind. With you and I being near the coast, it's really hard to get a decent position with the quadricopter during days with 5 mph wind or greater. It does not take much wind at all to move that thing all over the place. It does self-stabilize, but it's a bear to get it in the position you need it to be to get that perfect picture. Also, the photo quality is not that great with the down camera (very grainy and not adjustable), but the one set at an angle is better quality.

    If you are going to use the device for photos, you are smart to consider using the one that is Go-Pro compatible; it costs more, but the photos will (if no wind) will be the quality that you need when submitting to the carrier. Also you can adjust the camera angle before it sets to the sky.

    Keep in mind you can always just purchase a $20 monopod from Amazon, set your camera on a 5 second self-timer and snap decent overviews of one story roof's without getting on them (wind event only disclaimer like you said above). It's also great for snapping expanded overview shots of my larger commercial roofs. In conclusion, the monopod is simpler/easier to use than overdoing my inspections with an expensive toy that I rarely get to use.
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    ChuckDeaton
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    12/08/2013 9:33 AM
    There are much better drones than the Parrot, several websites sell the parts for assembly. The wind problem is minimized with a larger, hence heavier drone. The cameras can be a combination of remote controlled and still.

    Another workable thought is a remote controlled 4X4 truck chassis with various remote control cameras mounted.

    Also, Sony sells a pair of video binoculars. Expensive, but they allow the field claims representative to inspect and photograph a roof from across the street.
    "Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
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    Leland
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    12/08/2013 11:27 PM
    The Samsung nx300 and nx1000 cameras can be controlled remotely by a smartphone after downloading a free app. That means you can mount the camera on a pole and get the camera very close to what you want to photograph, and use the smartphone to zoom in and out, focus, and click the shutter. Cameras can also be remotely controlled with older technology including radio and wired connections. Most remote shutters are camera specific and can be found on Ebay and Amazon. Range for low frequency radio controlled shutter is about 300 feet. Here's a link to a $20 radio control for a nikon camera:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/350448...18?lpid=82

    To mount the camera on a pole you can use an aluminum telescoping painters pole after screwing on an adapter that has a male thread like a tripod fitting.

    You can buy an aluminum adapter online:

    http://www.amazon.com/Sky-Reach-pcc...im_sbs_p_5

    or just make your own from a paint roller for $4:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40NsyAullr4

    or jury rig it by gluing, taping, soldering or welding the part from a tripod or the correct size threaded bolt (¼-20 thread) to whatever kind of pole you want to use.

    here is a link to a specialty company that makes hardware for pole mounted cameras:

    http://www.kaceyenterprises.com/?page_id=871

    Another way you can go is to use one of the new "lens cameras" that have no display of their own because they need to use your smartphone's display.

    The next link is for a Sony Lens Camera that has the typical threaded hole for a tripod (so it could be easily mounted on a pole) and it sounds like it can be controlled by the smart phone some distance away.

    http://www.engadget.com/2013/09/18/...10-review/


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    CatAdjusterX
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    12/09/2013 3:23 AM

    Some of this stuff sounds pretty cool.

    Yet, to play Devil's Advocate, what happens when this "Drone" malfunctions and crashes into the risk, causing even more damage? Anything created by man is going to fail at one point or another. What if one of these HELO Drones nose dives into the risk or worse crashes into the insured or even you the adjuster,  killing them/yourself ? 

    This just happened a few months ago in Central Park, NYC (Granted this was for recreational purposes but the man who was remote piloting the damn thing was literally beheaded!)

     

    I am completely aware these simply hypothetical questions but what kind of liability is the carrier as well as the adjuster utilizing such technology exposing themselves to? I may be mistaken but isn't using a drone in a commercial application require registration and clearance from none other than the FAA?

    Last question, what kind of situation would the initial expense to purchase the equipment be worth it to deploy such technology as opposed to an EagleView or RidgeTop satellite report when these reports can be generated for $25.00 USD or less?

    Believe me, I for one do not enjoy climbing a roof especially after my accident. Yet what scenario would justify the use of the aforementioned technology? 

    "A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
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    AcceleratedAdjuster
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    12/09/2013 6:08 AM
    Posted By CatAdjusterX on 12/09/2013 3:23 AM

    Some of this stuff sounds pretty cool.

    Yet, to play Devil's Advocate, what happens when this "Drone" malfunctions and crashes into the risk, causing even more damage? Anything created by man is going to fail at one point or another. What if one of these HELO Drones nose dives into the risk or worse crashes into the insured or even you the adjuster,  killing them/yourself ? 

    This just happened a few months ago in Central Park, NYC (Granted this was for recreational purposes but the man who was remote piloting the damn thing was literally beheaded!)

     

    I am completely aware these simply hypothetical questions but what kind of liability is the carrier as well as the adjuster utilizing such technology exposing themselves to? I may be mistaken but isn't using a drone in a commercial application require registration and clearance from none other than the FAA?

    Last question, what kind of situation would the initial expense to purchase the equipment be worth it to deploy such technology as opposed to an EagleView or RidgeTop satellite report when these reports can be generated for $25.00 USD or less?

    Believe me, I for one do not enjoy climbing a roof especially after my accident. Yet what scenario would justify the use of the aforementioned technology? 


    Physical danger: The Parrot AR drone has forward and down looking cameras, weighs only a few pounds and has a foam outer shell for indoor use, which can also be used outdoors. The down looking camera is a bit grainy, but the forward looks pretty good. The only to kill anyone with one of these would be to forcibly feed it to them.

    Legality:  In 1946 the Supreme Court acknowledged that the air had become a "public highway" but a landowner still had dominion over “at least as much of the space above the ground as he can occupy or use in connection with the land.” In that case the court held that a plane flying just 83 feet in the air represented an invasion of property. The justices declined to precisely define the height at which ownership rights end. Today, the federal government considers the area above 500 feet to be navigable airspace in uncongested areas.Within this "private airspace", anyone can fly anything they want, so long as it is intended and allowed by the owner of the property. Apparently, drones cannot be used for commercial purposes; so the question would be: If the homeowner (and airspace owner) requests an inspection of their inaccessible roof, can you use the drone to get the photos you need? As long as one had permission and was flying at the request of the homeowner, I could not see a possible invasion of privacy issue, which means someone might need to test the theory (but remember: pioneers get the arrows!).

    Justifiable scenarios: Yes, Eagleview, Pictometry, Ridgetop and so on is great; for measurements. What if you only have a 28' ladder and you end up at a 3 story 12/12 apartment complex with no roof access? A forward looking drone like the one here:  http://www.verizonwireless.com/accessories/parrot-ar-drone-2-0/ would be a great way to get an inspection of the roof done. Video or photos of every inch of the roof. If there is damage, order up your Eagleview.

     

    www.acceleratedadjusting.com www.acceleratedadjustingisrael.com
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    ChuckDeaton
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    12/09/2013 10:58 AM
    Join an RC club, at least some have members who build and fly helicopter type drones.

    The AR Parrot is a lightweight, comparatively inexpensive, mass produced model. The spinning blades of an AR Drone moving at speed will bring blood on collision.

    The larger custom made helicopter drones with cameras attached and the necessary batteries and multiple motors are significantly heavier and will, at speed, inflict serious bodily harm.

    There are several internet sites that sell the parts and gear necessary to assemble a drone that will carry a video camera.
    "Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
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    Leland
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    12/09/2013 11:17 AM
    the camera on a pole is much easier to do than a drone. You can also do like Hollywood and rig a counterweight, like a 5lb weight from a dumbell, so the pole will be stable in one hand, and not move in a wind.

    on another note, amazon has Bosch laser measuring devices now on Christmas sale for $75, they are normally over 100. This is a step below a disto, but a good quality product. This is the most common measuring device I see adjusters and contractors use.

    http://www.amazon.com/Bosch-DLR130K...477&sr=1-1
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    Tom Rongstad
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    Posts:76


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    12/12/2013 11:27 AM
    In regards to the electronic measuring device, I do have one. But maybe I am too "Old School", as I love my 30 foot Stanley. I know it takes longer, and all the other pro's, but I sure as heck trust it.

    Now I do use the electronic measuring device for high ceilings, where I am unable to "walk" the tape up the wall.

    I guess for now, the "camera on the pole" is the winner of this conversation, for alternative roof access.

    However, last night I did dream about a remote control tank, the ones with the rubber tracks like a bull dozer made for the swamps.

    Man, was this thing cool. You would set it on the edge of the roof, and then control it from the ground. It had stabbilizer arms so it could not turn over on a 12 on 12. It had an adjustable telescopic pole with a camera, and another arm to hold the Chaulk for roof coloring test squares. Now that would be the "Bomb". Just a dream for now.
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    Tom Rongstad
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    12/12/2013 11:30 AM
    Posted By Jud G. on 12/06/2013 10:41 PM
    I've got an AR Parrott and it works great when there's no wind. With you and I being near the coast, it's really hard to get a decent position with the quadricopter during days with 5 mph wind or greater. It does not take much wind at all to move that thing all over the place. It does self-stabilize, but it's a bear to get it in the position you need it to be to get that perfect picture. Also, the photo quality is not that great with the down camera (very grainy and not adjustable), but the one set at an angle is better quality.

    If you are going to use the device for photos, you are smart to consider using the one that is Go-Pro compatible; it costs more, but the photos will (if no wind) will be the quality that you need when submitting to the carrier. Also you can adjust the camera angle before it sets to the sky.

    Keep in mind you can always just purchase a $20 monopod from Amazon, set your camera on a 5 second self-timer and snap decent overviews of one story roof's without getting on them (wind event only disclaimer like you said above). It's also great for snapping expanded overview shots of my larger commercial roofs. In conclusion, the monopod is simpler/easier to use than overdoing my inspections with an expensive toy that I rarely get to use.

    So noted Buddy, by the way, haven't seen around the local CE's latley. Been too busy?
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    Jud G.
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    01/16/2014 11:18 AM

    Yep, too busy.  Local work combined with a large loss has kept me restricted to work and family stuff for now. 

    If you end up getting the high tech toy, let us know how it goes.

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    Tom Rongstad
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    01/29/2015 9:27 AM
    Yesterday, an engaged expert met me to perform a building failure analysis inspection and possessed a Drone to assist in the multistory examination.

    First time I have been up close and personal to a $5,000 big boy toy like this.

    Speed : 50 MPH
    Fly time: 20 minutes
    Monitored by an I-Pad, so he can see the flight, capture photos or videos.

    He can program a flight pattern from Pace to the GOM, and let it go. It can climb two miles high.

    Fifty percent into the flight time, the Drone knows to turn and come home, prior to mission completion, and land within three feet of take off location, in order to make it home on its power. I was impressed.

    Then he mentioned the infrared camera he possess. That is when it got interesting.

    At three am, he sends the Drone on a scouting flight with the infrared camera. Locates the deer.

    Then at sunrise, changes cameras, zooms at 50 MPH to where the deer were located with infrared camera and slowly flies behind them, pushing the deer to his stand.

    He picks the one he wants, and pushes the target right to him.

    Bang, he is done.

    You should have seen that high winds inspection he performed on a roof collapse yesterday.
    I gotta get one, and fit it to hold a large piece of Chaulk
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    pondman
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    01/31/2015 11:03 PM

    Great for inspection, but as for hunting....That is not hunting. I would like to take the man up to Kodiak Alaska, and as the tide goes out leave him alone to hunt Kodiak Bear on the island....or should I say be hunted.

    Leave the toys at home and hunt the way it was meant to be, As far as I am concerned that is no different than "spotlight" hunting.

    Give them what they want, when they want it, and how they want it !
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    stormcrow
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    Posts:437


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    02/12/2015 11:13 AM

    Hunting or slaughter?

    Used to be the rich used beaters to chase the game to where they were, so they did not have to hunt, they could sit still and slaughter the game as it fled, how sporting.

    These tools can be usefull or there uses can be sad. How long before some clown brings down a plane?

    I want to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like his passengers.
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    adjustingto6figures
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    11/05/2017 3:14 AM
    With the use of drone insurance claims, adjusting jobs are easier, safer and completed faster. Check out this blog about drones for adjusting: https://adjustingto6figures.com/dro...ce-claims/
    Adjuster Resources: http://www.adjustingto6figures.com Adjuster Courses: http://learning.adjustingto6figures.com The Adjuster Shop: http://shop.adjustingto6figures.com
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