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Last Post 11/26/2018 11:06 AM by  TXAD
Newbie Questions Experienced Guys Please Help
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Author Messages
Olegred
Member
Member
Posts:363


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08/03/2008 8:54 PM
So, basically, either go staff or just sit tight and wait for next Katrina, right. Well, looks like that's what my choices are right now :)

Still, I can hardly believe that you guys do all this work for so little money (as you say) .... Why not just go staff?
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HuskerCat
Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Posts:762


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08/03/2008 10:53 PM

Why haven't more of us gone back staff?  Probably because we're no longer spring chickens, and the climate has changed since those days when we were.  The rooster in the chicken pen used to be the wise old claims manager who recognized talent, and gave the claim rep some authority to settle claims on the spot after that rep had exhibited coverage knowledge as well as being able to arrive at a true & tested loss amount.   But in the past several years those roosters have been replaced by laying hens known as bean counters.  They sit on the nest, without any real motivation other than keeping the eggs warm.   Without the roosters, those eggs are only warm...no chicks, just a bad smell a few days later.   Maybe when the smell gets too bad, it will all come full circle. 

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Medulus
Moderator
Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Posts:786


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08/04/2008 1:29 AM
Mike,

You would be surprised where we write policies. We're licensed to write policies in all fifty states.
Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

"With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
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Doug
Guest
Guest
Posts:29


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08/15/2008 6:21 PM
I went staff the first part of '07 --- for 2 months (a prominent carrier with a huge office in the OKC area)

Entry level staff pay, then deductions for insurance, etc. which were almost what i can get paying out of pocket, the tedium of sitting in a cubicle most of the day, suspicious supervisors trying to climb the ladder on the backs of subordinates they can squash, ----
i could go on and on, but won't in this forum

wasn't worth it -- i decided i'd rather deal with a few slow months here and there than deal with corporate america

I will qualify that statement by saying i have a good relationship with a vendor who has kept me busy since then, ---- if staff was my only way , i would have a different view of it most likely, strictly for survival reasons
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HuskerCat
Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Posts:762


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08/16/2008 11:34 PM

Have to say again, I love that little photo you use.....the corporate a-hole supervisor from "Office Space".   As Longerman always liked to say "why don't you just go ahead & come in Saturday? Or, why don't you just go ahead and have that report on my desk in one hour?, etc."   You, my friend, understandably typify the independent adjuster of our age as long as other options are available to you.  But for some, it can be bite the bullet and play along with the game.  Gettin' er done just doesn't seem sometimes to be enough.     

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odil1372
Guest
Guest
Posts:1


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11/07/2008 12:29 AM
Thanks to everyone that has posted to this thread. I am a new member and one of those guys that just got my crisp license recently. I have learned alot just from reading through you comments.

Also, Toll, I happen to live in the Ft. Smith area and got some of that damage you had to come work through a couple of months ago.

Thanks,
Odie
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BobH
Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Posts:759


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11/08/2008 10:05 PM

Posted By HuskerCat on 16 Aug 2008 11:34 PM
...that little photo you use.....the corporate a-hole supervisor from "Office Space".     

Jeez Mike, you're right!  I hadn't put 2 & 2 together,  and sort of wondered "what if it's NOT a photo of  the office - space guy"...   so I did a search on it - sure enough.  It's not a self-portrait of our adjuster friend.  
 
Great movie, hadn't seen it in a while.  I liked the part where they take the printer out in the field and retaliate with a baseball bat for the paper jams.
 
Office Space Photo
 
In this photo the "a-hole supervisor" is looking at his watch - the guy to the right looks thrilled...
Bob H
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Ray Hall
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts:2443


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07/29/2010 11:53 AM
This is an old post that has a lot of good advise for new people. Most of you know by now that your first and 2nd year of trying to get out on a storm is the hardest. Now when you get a call, you will have about 2-3 weeks to keep the attention of the vendor who sent you. This is something not talked about a lot, but the carriers can tell a new person, when the read the first report and form an opinion from the first dozen files. Although you never know who is reading your file, this person has a lot to do with your future deployments for their company. Always try to stand out with your files. Never settle for "getting em throught"
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ddreisbach
Member
Member
Posts:172


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07/29/2010 7:11 PM
Apparently, this was our friend Olegred's (AKA Alex) first post. The first of many.
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Joe60
Guest
Guest
Posts:29


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07/30/2010 9:29 AM
Apparently, Olegred posted 278 times from June 11, 2008, when he joined, until August 3, 2008 ( this thread). When did he sleep? Adjusters may not often agree with him, but I must admit, that I miss the excitement when he is not posting.
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Valeriecoop38
Guest
Guest
Posts:1


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05/26/2012 1:50 PM

I do not think asking questions is rude at all! I am training still and getting ready to take Texas all lines exam. I am curious about a lot of things but my man is already an IA through Alamo at State Farm here in Bloomington Illinois. We want to go to Renfro and have someone with a lot of pull:) 

How is your progress?


Valerie

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claims_ray
Member
Member
Posts:293


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05/28/2012 2:56 PM
That sounds like a good deal for you. What does Renfro get?
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coderguy
Guest
Guest
Posts:1


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07/16/2012 3:49 AM
I posted a question but it hasn't yet passed moderation, so I'll give my two cents as a business person that also has to travel a lot, but I am not an insurance adjuster.

First off, the people claiming this business is so stressful, well most businesses are stressful. Unless you go into tourism or travel or some kind of happy-go-lucky business and you end up getting lucky yourself and finding a niche that works in some other industry, it's always going to be stressful, that's life. LIFE CAN BE STRESSFUL!

Is it less stressful to be a doctor when you make a mistake and kill a patient, then you have to lie to their loved ones and say an unfortunate complication developed?
Is it less stressful to be a lawyer and to call up a client and tell him the case went against him and he now owes his life savings to be paid to the other side?
Is it less stressful to be in computer disaster recovery and have to tell a client that 5+ years of work has been lost and will never be recovered, and since you did not have data-loss insurance your business is gone and finished?
Is it less stressful to work in a coal mine or chemical plant and breathe toxic fumes all day and develop lung problems?
Is it less stressful to be a roofer in Arizona when it is 120 degrees outside?
It it less stressful to be a baseball player when you got injured right before your contract was signed, and you may never play again and you have no other job prospects?

I could name 100 jobs more stressful, but I could also probalby name 100 jobs less stressful.

There are plenty of jobs that are FAR FAR more stressful than this job, this job IMHO is just in the middle of stressful situations. It just depends on what type of stress you want to deal with, as with all businesses.

Even though I asked a question in this forum in another post (again note yet answered), I have my doubts of getting any reliable responses as forums tend to attract a lot of bitter people.

Anyhow, a lot of the information here is good, but much of it you have cipher through and a lot of people are just useless blabbing and venting about the business. It's a tough economy right now and anyone making a living wage should have at least some gratefulness (it's easy to get bitter, but it takes much more discipline to be grateful)...
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okclarryd
Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Posts:954


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07/18/2012 7:20 PM
Ya know, Coderguy, you're right. There's lots more stuff that is more stressful.

2 1/2 years in Nam come to mind.

Every vocation has its own set of stresses. They're all different and the same. I usually had a pretty good time working as I enjoyed the work, I enjoyed the reward, I enjoyed the opportunity to see different parts of the US of A and meeting people from just about every segment of society. Sure, some days were better than others but I rarely had a "bad day". I had a bunch of busy days that were longer than I wished but even then, I was glad to be working and doing what I did.

I just don't dwell on the "bad days".. There's usually some humor in there somewhere.

Happy Trails
Larry D Hardin
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abemazza
Guest
Guest
Posts:1


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09/20/2012 5:37 PM
I feel for you, after alot of $ and down time waiting and sending resumes, how can I get any experience if no one will give you a chance,,,I am very discouraged, and broke
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olderthendirt
Member
Member
Posts:160


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09/21/2012 1:01 AM
The rainbow may not have a pot of gold. But the promises are fools gold.
Life is like a sewer, what you get out of it depends on what you put in it
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stormcrow
Member
Member
Posts:437


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09/21/2012 4:53 PM
The real pot of gold has become trainning an endless stream of people with some one and willing to believe that with a few courses they to can make $30,000 a month or more. If it sounds to good to be true, it likely is. I would be shocked if 15% of the peope trainned since 2005 even make their money back.
I want to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like his passengers.
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Leland
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Posts:741


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09/21/2012 5:35 PM
nobody wants to start by working for a contractor first. That's how I started. If the job involves commission sales, at least partly, then a total new person is more likely to get a chance. If you can't close a sale, you don't get paid, so employers are more willing to risk hiring you. Most restoration contractors have combination salespeople/estimators/project managers. The position requires all three skills or at least 2 of the three. The Xactimate estimating and project management are directly related to the insurance adjusting world, and the sales practice is just generally good for anybody in business. Any adjuster could benefit from knowing how to talk to people and gain their cooperation and understanding, something that sales teaches.

So find a job with an insurance contractor. Get paid to learn. Then you can meet adjusters and ask them for opportunities to interview at their companies.
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ChuckDeaton
Life Member
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts:1110


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09/21/2012 11:05 PM
There is a new sheriff in town, at least in Arkansas, new that is, continuing education, that is the continueing education hours needed to maintain not only your home state license but all the certifications necessary to continue working, working and earning.

This comes to my mind because of the monies laid out to become flood certified and to continue my Arkansas adjusters license.

Just the expense for the flood certification class, it was held in New Orleans and was free, totaled about 600USD. I went to New Orleans from Little Rock and stayed overnight in a motel.

This is the fourth trip made this year for various certifications.

The cost of the 25 hours of Arkansas continuing education is not in, but a guess would be around 500USD.
"Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
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CatAdjusterX
Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Posts:964


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09/23/2012 1:39 AM
Posted By ChuckDeaton on 21 Sep 2012 11:05 PM
There is a new sheriff in town, at least in Arkansas, new that is, continuing education, that is the continueing education hours needed to maintain not only your home state license but all the certifications necessary to continue working, working and earning.

This comes to my mind because of the monies laid out to become flood certified and to continue my Arkansas adjusters license.

Just the expense for the flood certification class, it was held in New Orleans and was free, totaled about 600USD. I went to New Orleans from Little Rock and stayed overnight in a motel.

This is the fourth trip made this year for various certifications.

The cost of the 25 hours of Arkansas continuing education is not in, but a guess would be around 500USD.

...................................

Chuck, I am happy you were able to get  FCN# in NOLA. Was the workshop handled by NFIPI? Also curious to know if an IA firm sponsored the workshop. I renewed my FCN# for 2012/2013 at an NFIPI workshop in Anaheim, California. The year prior to that I renewed my FCN# at the Crawford conference in Dallas at NO cost. This workshop had a $40.00USD cost from the IA firm who sponsored the event.

From one of your posts you spoke of the event selling out quick. They moved the event to a larger venue, was it a madhouse, how many folks were there with you?

"A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
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