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Last Post 08/25/2007 8:50 PM by  mossback
RE Getting Started
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Medulus
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08/07/2007 11:13 AM

    This post was moved here from the Catastrophe Central Forums:

    "Hi guys! I've been lurking on this board for a while.

    I got my TX adjusting license a few months ago. Attended classes for adjusting and Xactimate. I've done the Citizen's certification.

    I keep seeing ads for "Daily Claims". I've applied and not heard anything other than thank you and you are on our roster.

    So what does it take to finally get started? Is it really just a waiting game for a hurricane? Any suggestions?

     

    Steph"

    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
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    Medulus
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    08/07/2007 11:23 AM

    Stephanie,

    I would like to be able to say that there is enough work to go around for all, but the truth of the matter is that daily claims will generally go to those who not only possess some measure of experience.  Not only that, but the nature of daily claims is varied.  This means that they will generally go to those who have a variety of experience in claim handling.  Daily claims will include not simply wind and hail, but fires, thefts, vandalism, freight, large and small commercial, and several different types of claims.  They will also include liability and casualty claims. 

    I won't say that it isn't possible to get daily claims if you have less experience, but it will take considerable marketing effort on your part to compete with those who already have made the contacts and have a track record for handling these types of claims.

    There is a wealth of advice on this website, both in the archives and in the newer forum posts, on getting started.  I think you will find that the most frequently asked question is "I just got my Texas Adjusting License.  What do I do now?"  Over the years there have been a plethora of answers to that question, some very helpful and some not so helpful.

    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
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    Buford Gonzales
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    08/07/2007 9:44 PM
    If you find work with a restoration company you will learn how to write a $15,000 estimate for pulling out 20 sf of carpet pad.


    Bobaboey

    I seriously need the name of your restoration company, they appear to be quite a bit less expensive than the ones my carrier's seem to find.
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    Ray Hall
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    08/07/2007 10:56 PM

    Steph: Ask yourself if you can bring any acquired abilities to a employer (catastrophe vendor) in time of need, if you can you will work, but it will take a major hurricane and this may be the year.

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    HuskerCat
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    08/08/2007 6:01 AM
    Stephanie... In case you haven't run across it yet, go to Channels-Articles, and read Steve's viewpoint as a branch assistant working daily claims. Even though it's about 7 years old, and he's updated it alittle...it all still holds true. He put into words exactly what I would have written, if I had his command of the pen (or keyboard, as we now have to use).
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    stephie76
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    08/08/2007 5:33 PM

    Thanks for telling me about the article! It was a great piece of information.

    There is so much on this site. I need to surf around it more.

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    JimGary
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    08/08/2007 9:25 PM
    Steph, I have also looked into those ads claiming dayclaim positions. Though I have been able to get some claims, i have not received anything from those companies advertising on CADO or the other cat sights. In my opinion those companies are just trying to build their roster numbers. They actually have nothing to offer in the way of daily work, if they do they save it for their own people that they have used before and want to foster loyalty with. I can't blame them for that. It is disheartening for those looking for work, only to find that it is only a way to get a name on a list.

    Just my opinion
    JWG
    I know the voices aren't real, but sometimes they're right!
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    stephie76
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    08/08/2007 9:47 PM

    Jimgary,

    That is what I was beginning to think as well. Oh well, can't hurt to have my name out there as much as possible though

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    ranger
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    08/09/2007 9:23 AM
    I agree with Jim Gary. I believe you are doing the right thing in getting your name out there. Have you put your name with the three top catastrophe vendors?
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    cajunadj
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    08/09/2007 11:57 AM

    The big four vendors that I know want at least 3 and one of them 5 years verifiable experience. i work with one of them and they are also slow at this time. I am sure that if there is a major hurricane, you will be called. When you do, be good, quick and as accurate as possible. While there at the cat site, if it is for one of the smaller vendors, make sure you find where the larger vendors are and interact with them. Meet as many people as you can and introduce yourself. If you get a chance to do clean-up, by all means do so. That is how I started working with the big ones..It is hard to get on with a major vendor, and harder to stay there. But once you do, you will really appreciate the difference.

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    TBurnett
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    08/12/2007 11:51 PM
    I am also just getting started and want to tell you all thanks! I thought I was going crazy trying to find work.
    With this information I am a little wiser! Thanks again.
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    SteveZ
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    08/15/2007 11:17 PM
    I think it would be interesting to know just how all of the NEWBIES are getting the impression that we are all part-time millionaires... Everyone I meet that "just got their Texas license" has to have had someone tell them that they will all get rich quick, or they would not be so eager to join our band of gypsies.

    Maybe a new topic about "How you learned about cat adjusting" is in order...
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    stephie76
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    08/16/2007 12:33 AM

    I learned about Cat adjusting from a friend who has been an adjuster for the Hartford for 20 years. I eventually wanted to get into SIU. I was previously a fraud investigator.

    All of the SIU jobs that I have found want years of adjusting experience. So.... here I am.

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    Doug
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    08/16/2007 2:34 PM
    SIU ? cool cool. That is an avenue i would like to explore sometime as i meander down my career path. I am sure the reality is not as glamorous and much more of this work is probably done on the telephone than being an "in the field Magnum PI" type though.
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    Florida Boy
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    08/16/2007 4:53 PM
    Posted By stephie76 on 08/16/2007 12:33 AM

    I learned about Cat adjusting from a friend who has been an adjuster for the Hartford for 20 years. I eventually wanted to get into SIU. I was previously a fraud investigator.

    All of the SIU jobs that I have found want years of adjusting experience. So.... here I am.

     

    That is not entirely true.

     

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    SteveZ
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    08/16/2007 11:28 PM
    Seems to me that the more people get involved with our line of work, the more "diluted" the pot becomes. This will undoubtedly result in lower wages for us all. The more folks doing the 'job', the more competition there is for claims. Either the carrier will begin giving us each FEWER claims, OR, they will "whore out" to the lowest bidder with lower fee schedules. Either way, the more folks that become 'adjusters', the lower our pay will get.

    Just a thought for those who think...
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    Rockey
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    08/17/2007 1:25 AM
    SteveZ,
    As a new adjuster my goal is to make the going rate of IA. Not to bid lower as to get the job. I want to help the insured recupe loss and keep Insureance CO cost low. Not to underbid the expeienced udjuster that can help or mentor me to do a better job. Lowing fee bids/schedule will only invite those who do not care about doing the fair and right thing. Tht would seem to me to be money grubbing and not improve anyones situation.
    As a new adjuster I would think I can ask 60% or day rate as the Co pays. not to low bit anything.
    DR
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    stephie76
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    08/17/2007 10:33 AM

    Steve,

    I am sure you will be just fine. Lots of adjusters that got into the business after Katrina or during have already moved on since 2006 was dead.

    Don't get your panties in a wad. It wll be ok. I won't underbid you.

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    IMGray
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    08/17/2007 7:28 PM
    For anyone getting started in the cat adjusting profession, whether a newbie or former staff adjuster, there's one very important question that you should ask yourself before you make the leap:

    Am I mature enough to handle the money I make, whether it's a lot or a little?

    You need to be able to sock enough money away to get you through the slow times or at least have a backup plan for employment. Also, you have to remember you're not in the Showcase of "The Price Is Right" when the paychecks from working a big storm start coming in. There are more than a few very good adjusters who can't manage their money and blow every dollar they've taken in. When work slows down, you'll see quite a few houses, boats, motorcycles, etc. for sale. In order to be successful long term, you have to be able to both manage your money and put out a quality work product.

    I was a staff adjuster for 14 years before I made the switch to cat work. Before making the jump, I knew I had a good enough handle on my lifestyle to do this. There's no way I could have done this in my 20's. I would have been the guy holding a "Will Adjust For Food" sign on the roadside. If you're a person who isn't smart with your money, this may not be the best profession for you.

    Mick
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    01Snake
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    08/17/2007 10:33 PM
    Posted By IMGray on 08/17/2007 7:28 PM
    If you're a person who isn't smart with your money, this may not be the best profession for you.

     

    Truer words have never been spoken!!
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