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Last Post 08/21/2007 6:38 PM by  SteveZ
Aerial Imagery
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CCarr
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07/31/2007 2:00 PM

    I tried to find Ol' Trader Ray's FISCUS thread to make a comment on this, in that venue, but couldn't find it.  But Ray, how do you - and others - think that this technology will blend / conflict with "traditional" claims handling methods?

    In today's (07/31) Wall Street Journal (Marketplace Section - Business Technology) there is a good article on the evolving uses of aerial imagery - and the uses that roofers, realators, landscapers and insurers are utilizing the technology for.

    The technology has evolved to allow accurate measurements of areas - be they a roof, lawn, or pool.  And, I might add, the detail of the images is far superior to many photos I've seen in claim files.

    Augmenting the services of such companies as: Google Earth, MS Live Search Maps and Zillow.com, are companies such as Stockton Infrared Thermographics, that offer even greater detail on roof conditions.

    You don't even have to do the image searching yourself, or depend on your trusty "claims aid person". Companies like Whitegold Solutions, in California, employ 75 people in India, to search and analyze aerial images on demand; claiming insurance adjusters as being among its' customer base.

    That old ladder is heading for the Poloroid pile of redundant antiquities.

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    katadj
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    07/31/2007 10:29 PM

     Glad to see the wise ones return to the fold. Welcome Clayton.

    It is true that aerial imagery is being used extensively, by those whom are extremely pro-active.

    The carriers can use it as an excellent underwriting tool, and sales tool, not to mention the pre-event and post event photographs of an insured property. One such instrument is SkyScope , with which I am intimately familiar.

    There are numerous uses for this newer technology, and some have been developing it for many years. They can even provide a three dimensional photograph of an individual building. The demo i saw at the 2007, 100th anniversary of the BOMA convention absolutely blew me away.

    No doubt it is here to stay, as is all the newer technology, which is the driving force behind the changes in our industry that Clayton alluded to several years ago.

    The changes are rapid, necessary and deserve attention. Kinna like writing an estimate by hand (which some still do) and then writing one on a computer full of macros. Time is money and to save time is to earn additional money.

    "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new... Albert Einstein"
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    Ray Hall
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    08/01/2007 11:29 AM

    Clayton great post, thanks.  It appears two old boys who walked three miles in the snow and always promoted improvements in claim resolutions have seen a quantum leap in this article.

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    okclarryd
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    08/04/2007 3:50 PM
    I have noticed a trend to move forward with technology in the various insurance venues but, folks, it is crawling forward. Only the independents are at the forefront of technology. The companies are still conservative in their recognition that there may be a better way to skin a cat and are unwilling to move quickly to take advantage of any new and better procedures.

    If they move too fast, jobs are lost, managers no longer manage, supervisors no longer, ..........uh.......well, do what ever supervisors do, and now the whole apple cart is off in the ditch.

    Call centers are here. Telephone adjusting is here. Outside adjusters are dwindling in number. Office adjusters and outside inspectors is a way of life for many. Claims managers are now personnel managers taking care of a day care center for adults.

    There are new and better ways of handling insurance claims. Satellite photography is among them.

    I can only hope to be retired and done with the whole thing by the time the insurance industry catches on.

    Larry D Hardin
    Larry D Hardin
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    HuskerCat
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    08/04/2007 11:43 PM

    I think you're right, Larry...I just wish I was as old as you are and as financially secure.  I'd rest a lot easier, but be having a lot less fun (at times). 

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    Ray Hall
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    08/05/2007 4:51 PM

    Larry you will be one of the first called to sit in your home10-12 hours per day and look at the images on your screen, pass them on to the key punch folks, get the file back back, order the check and close 40 to 50 dwelling losses per day, while sitting in your PJ.s.

    I wish someone would crank up Monday 08/06/07 as  we both could use the experience of inspecting thousands of roofs to make the right calls from our home/office.

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    Ray Hall
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    08/06/2007 12:56 PM

    When will see this add on CADO ?

    Wanted old adjusters who have inspected thousands of roofs and dwellings for catastrophe losses to be a part of a new start up company. The duties will be to examine Aerial Imagery of storm damaged roofs, determine the scope and areas involved, send to the key stroke department, review and request a check then send to the central call center who will contact  and discuss the findings with the insured.

    As part of this 4 person team you can work from any place in the world, but are in a fast paced inviroment and you will be expected to close 40 to 50 roof claims per day.

    We will also need key stroke operators, call center operators(no experience needed). We will also need other personal that we can train to work the contents and additional living expense. The only person requiring an adjusters license would be the person discussing the figures with the insured, attorney or public adjuster.

    We work catastrophe losses all over the world and only the call center person would be required to speak the native language of the country involved. We are an equal oppertunity employer; however the prevailing wages for  the county you now live apply . We do check green cards as the founder of our company is an old southern red neck.

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    stormcrow
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    08/06/2007 6:29 PM

    Like so many great ideas, this will happen to some companies and last until they realize that you cann't tell the dieffernce between the golf ball in the a pair of nylons, a well used ball peen hammer and a real hail hit. If it is even possible to determine hail damage from space. Heck we cann't even identify Osama that way yet.

    I want to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like his passengers.
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    SteveZ
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    08/21/2007 6:38 PM
    GOOGLE EARTH... Phoooey !!!!
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