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Last Post 08/21/2011 10:44 AM by  FloridaBoy
Roof Safety
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Danny Cave
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01/08/2010 4:02 PM
Bob where did you get those clamps. Those are great! Thanks......
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BobH
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01/08/2010 7:20 PM

Here's the mfgr: http://www.irwin.com/irwin/consumer...Grip.jhtml

I have seen Irwin Quick-Grip clamps sold at Home Depot, Lowes, Ace Hardware, Orchard Supply Hardware, and Amazon.com

As a woodworker I use a lot of clamps.  Irwin clamps are expensive compared to the Chinese junk.  But you get what you pay for, and these do NOT slip or loosen up.  The others are imitators, these ones are the real deal and worth the expense.

Bob H
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david plywood
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05/17/2010 10:47 PM
Posted By ChuckDeaton on 14 Mar 2009 06:49 PM
If you are really interested contact me and meet me in Houma, LA and I will show you the equipment and how to use it. Cat 102 remains free for the asking.

 
I should of been reading this forum regularly,  I would of looked you up to learn about the climbing equipment. I was in Houma working Gustav a year and half ago. Nice town and I gained 5 pounds on the fried oyster po boys.
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ChuckDeaton
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05/17/2010 10:49 PM
I am still working Katrina, Gutsav and Ike claims, but now I am working out of my office in Little Rock.
"Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
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Ray Hall
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08/27/2010 9:00 AM
I would never say a "poor mans" roof boot is as good as cougar paws. I weight 200 # and use  Brahma Boots Walmart $26.00. Yellow  tops and a light green sole you can dig your finger nail into and push down. Seems most the Mexican Roofers in this area use them also.
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WILLIS
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08/27/2010 2:24 PM
Bob, The clamps are a great tool. I have a set as well but use a bungee cord with end hooks  for the tie off. Knots can sometimes slip. The scariest part of a steep roof is getting off alive.  I also use a modified stand off brace with rubber tips that will grip a fascia or gutter to stabilize the ladder.  I have been laughed at more than once with my standoff plus grips and tie off  but I could care less. It is my life and I prefer survival to injury; at my age and size  6'4" 235lbs  61 yrs old  hitting the ground is not the best option.  Like many, I find myself inspecting risks alone. It is better being safe than sorry. I have rope & harness, use them in real steep situations mostly for security. I too have a foam cushion. It has saved my life more than once.  I have my rules:  if the ladder is too short not extending over the shingles  I will not climb that roof. A 10-12/12 hip roof with no porch or valleys is a no-no, lose your balance and you are dead. I quit a job in WVA,  roofs on side of mountain 12/12+ no gutters back side drop was over 200 ft. Miss that side and you will need a parachute. Too much risk,  better to fold and work somewhere else.   Roofs that are very granular or worn out are death traps.  Floods are preferable mostly do not need ladders.
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CatAdjusterX
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08/28/2010 11:52 PM
Willis, great post !!
 
Those on the site for some time know what happened to me last year , but the new folks may not.
 
Last year October 2009, I was working the wildfires in So Cal.
26 October 2010, I was on a reinspection and me and the PA were on a 2 story roof, the ladder was short , we were close to vertical and had two people bracing the ladder
 
PA went first , as I came down the guys were distracted and let go and I tipped the ladder
 
I landed on a 4 ft chain link fence, broke my leg( compound fracture tore leg muscles and a nice pair of khakis) broke my pelvis,my jaw and fractured my skull.
 
I broke 4 of my ribs at the sternum( the PA said I stopped breathing and administered CPR) I since found out that ribs are commonly broken from extended CPR.  ( I guess all PA's aren't all bad :-)  )
 
I was in a wheelchair for 4 months, had 2 syrgeries, one to thread a rod through my leg bones so they would be stable while my torn muscles healed and I had a blood clot in my skull under the fracture site.
 
The point of this post is to tell new folks and even not so new folks that falling off a roof is a real risk and adjusters have and WILL die or be crippled , so take roof safety seriously.
 
I fell because the reinspection had already been rescheduled twice and I didn't want to reschedule for a longer ladder or a steep roof team and I almost lost my life, I chose to take a risk and make the climb unsafely
 
You can fall even when you are doing so safely , it only takes a moment
 
 
 
 
Robby Robinson 
"A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
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BILLY
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10/29/2010 9:40 PM
It's not the fall that gets you its the sudden stop that hurts!!






Billy Hinson
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KevinJ
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01/01/2011 7:41 PM
I recently worked a general liability claim where a handyman contractor was hired to check out the damage to a homeowner's roof and the shingles gave way, he fell 16feet to the grass, snapped his spine and will spend the rest of his life in a wheel chair....4 kids ages 2yr - 16years old. Roofs are part of our business, but I sure do advise climbers to listen to that little voice that pops up every now and again saying "are you crazy? no way are we going up there".......
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Jim
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01/03/2011 6:34 PM
Posted By Kevin on 01 Jan 2011 07:41 PM
I recently worked a general liability claim where a handyman contractor was hired to check out the damage to a homeowner's roof and the shingles gave way, he fell 16feet to the grass, snapped his spine and will spend the rest of his life in a wheel chair....4 kids ages 2yr - 16years old. Roofs are part of our business, but I sure do advise climbers to listen to that little voice that pops up every now and again saying "are you crazy? no way are we going up there".......

 

3 words,  "ROPE AND HARNESS".  Even a 6/12 roof is unsteady with loose granules.  My kit costs me less than the cost of the hospital copay of a minor fall. You don't need all the high dollar equipment for most roofs. If a rope can pull my big butt out of the water on a ski, it can sure steady my feet on a 6-10/12 mitch roof till I can afford the good stuff. A good harness can be bought off ebay for less than $50. If you get serious and want to handle the big stuff go get some training. After getting my certification, I found that my daughter got rock climbing training for a lot less than I paid (basically a club membership).  Just a thought.

 

JWG

I know the voices aren't real, but sometimes they're right!
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earthwindnfire
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06/20/2011 9:03 AM
8 or 9/12 is my limit with paws- A 5X20 test square along the gutter line = a 10X10 test square up in the slope. No need to get on anything that is unsafe. If you gauge the pitch correctly you can enter an accurate Xactimate diagram from the ground. Just get your test squares done from the gutter line on your ladder and go.
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RobG
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08/06/2011 1:20 PM

 

I'm a new Adjuster, recently licensed. In reading about roof safety I've read and spoken with Adjusters about safety gear. Discussing shoes, some have the latest trend and have bought Cougar Paws. Those that have bought them like them. There are other time-tested roofing shoes from Duluth, Red Wing, Thorogood, Iron Age, and others. Are the Cougars a better choice? Experienced djusters... your thoughts?
Rob
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stormcrow
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08/08/2011 9:16 PM
I use my Cougar Paws on any roof over 4/12 or higher then one story, period. I am getting old and intend on getting older.
I want to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like his passengers.
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CatAdjusterX
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08/09/2011 6:22 PM
Posted By RobG on 06 Aug 2011 01:20 PM

 

I'm a new Adjuster, recently licensed. In reading about roof safety I've read and spoken with Adjusters about safety gear. Discussing shoes, some have the latest trend and have bought Cougar Paws. Those that have bought them like them. There are other time-tested roofing shoes from Duluth, Red Wing, Thorogood, Iron Age, and others. Are the Cougars a better choice? Experienced djusters... your thoughts?



 

Rob,

Cougar paws are awesome to say for sure!! But never forget that the best way to keep yourself SAFE upstairs is.............Common Sense

Take it from someone who was wearing Cougar paws when I tipped a ladder and broke my leg,pelvis,ribs,jaw and a fractured skull. That happened 26 October 2009. Just recently  on 23 April 2011 one of our fellow adjusters Brian Jones shattered(not broke) shattered BOTH legs from the knees down. He just recently had a horrific infection from some of the hardware that hold his legs(what's left of them anyway) together and his life was in danger. Brian is going to be disabled for the rest of his life. It should be noted that he was ONLY on a 4/12 pitch 1 story roof . The ladder was on a smooth concrete(wet) patio and the ladder simply slid out from under him.

I am experienced and capable adjuster and Brian most certainly is one of the best adjusters I have ever worked with, but we both threw common sense out the window!!

We used other peoples ladders that we did NOT set up. Never use anyone's ladder but your own . As bad as it sounds, me and Brian are lucky !! We are lucky because quite a few adjusters over the years have DIED from the same falls we survived.

Be careful my friend, trust me the world is a better place with you in it, that goes for all rookie adjusters.

COMMON SENSE

"A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
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FloridaBoy
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08/21/2011 10:44 AM

" The ladder was on a smooth concrete(wet) patio and the ladder simply slid out from under him."

I NEVER put a ladder on concrete...period. Wet concrete is even worse. I always place my ladder in a spot that, if I fell, would do the least damage to me.  Also, drink plenty of water, you can easily become disoriented/lightheaded when you are partially dehydrated.

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