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Cecelia Sharpe
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Username: Cecelia

Post Number: 7
Registered: 12-2000

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Posted on Wednesday, May 22, 2002 - 10:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sorry it took me so long to jump into the discussion here.

Thank you, Jim, for your kind comments. This is a business that is difficult for everyone. The company trends and lack of storms do not help.

I, too, am big on education. I am still hoping that Jim plans to teach those AIC courses online.

Education is a must. Being physically fit is a must. Whenever you are with a more experienced adjuster, a GOOD adjuster, listen. If you don't understand, ask questions. Go to the gym and lift weights. Throwing a ladder around all day long isn't easy and you need the strength to do it, but also need to be in good enough shape that you aren't going to hurt yourself while doing it.

There are always politics and power plays wherever your assignment is. When it comes to your supervisors be as courteous as you can, as professional as you can and accept constructive criticism. He/She who holds the gold gets to make the rules. Try to be positive. Address concerns and issues that are a problem. But do it in a professional way. No one likes to deal with a whiner and a crier (male OR female).

Sometimes things work out well and sometimes they don't. Pick yourself up, dust yourself off and move on. That's one good thing about being an independent. No assignment lasts forever. This too shall pass. Unfortunately, the GOOD assignments don't last either. Weigh out the pros and cons and decide whether you want to deal with it.

Then "just do it".
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Kelly Cooper
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Username: Kjmcooper

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Registered: 5-2002

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Posted on Sunday, May 05, 2002 - 2:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I do agree that the policy information is a must. As a storm chasing contractor, I dealt with policies on every sale. This helped me a great deal. Then, I was fortunate enough to have someone take me under their wing initially. Plus, I have spent endless hours reading and learning on my own. Last, I have attended various adjusting seminars. My advice to your friend is: read anything and everything you can get your hands on, ask a lot of questions, and never assume that you know it all. I know that this is a constant learning process and it takes a lot of discipline.

I don't believe that this is the easiest way to become an adjuster. But, Donita was asking what she could do to get experience or to make herself more marketable as an adjuster. This may be a means to an end.

Hope this helps.
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Lee Mushaney
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Registered: 3-2001

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Posted on Friday, May 03, 2002 - 6:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kelly:
Just a question of curiousity. Coming in to the field from the contractor side and being able to write estimates and talk to an insured about repairs is great and totally necessary. How did you get the knowledge of the different policies that would allow you to tell the Insured what was covered and what wasn't? This is equally important if not more, unless we have big bucks on our E & O policy. Don't misunderstand, I am really only trying to get the information to someone that is coming into the field find help in getting that part of their education. I came in from the other side, so I really am interested in your expertise here and I am sure there are other women out there that are in the same boat and need to know where to find the Policy education. It isn't really something that can be learned walking into a Cat. you need it before you get there. Thanks for your imput
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Kelly J Cooper
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Posted on Wednesday, May 01, 2002 - 10:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree. I am a female CAT adjuster. I got my start as a storm chaser on the construction side for 5 years. I learned a great deal about storm damage and the claims process. This has proved to be invaluable. Have you thought about working sales for a contractor?

I have met numerous male adjusters that refused to climb the roofs that I climb. So, I don't think that sex has anything to do with it. I will say that it is harder to break into the Contracting side as a woman, than the adjusting side. (That is another story.)

Don't give up, just give yourself a little time. If you can get some contracting experience with your license, you have a great chance. Once the storm season has most adjuster's busy, companies are willing to take a chance on a green adjuster.

Good Luck!}
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Five Daily
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Username: Kitchenista

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Registered: 4-2002

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Posted on Tuesday, April 30, 2002 - 11:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with you Lee. I am a woman Cat adjuster also and this is no place for women's libber's. My handshake has to be just as firm as the roofer's I am meeting at the insured's house and my arms just as strong as the adjuster the insured's neighbor had across the street who pulled his ladder up on the garage to access the 2nd story roof.

Funny story.... my favorite question from an insured --
"How are you going to get up on the roof?"

Answer --
"I am going to put my ladder against the side of the house and climb on up."

The homeowner usually says, "Oh, I suppose that is how one gets up on the roof."

Catastrophe claims adjusting is not in your dna. It's a learned thing, no matter how you learn it, as long as you learn it right.

Jennifer
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Lee Mushaney
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Posted on Sunday, April 28, 2002 - 10:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Jim for the nice comments. It is not hard for a woman to break into this field. There are several things that are NECESSARY for anyone whether man or woman to make it in the Cat adjusting business:

1. They HAVE to know what they are talking about. People listen very carefully to make sure you have the knowledge you should have in order to handle the job. You can't bull crap your way thru; it is easily detected no matter how good you think you are at it. This holds for true for Policy and estimating damage. Once that is detected, you're through and you should be. This holds for men as well as women but they listen closer to women. When you know what you're doing you don't care how close they listen. Because you know your subject.

2. Women need to be leaving their women's lib attitudes at home. If they can't, they need to stay home too. In my opinion this isn't a field for women lib. You will go farther and do better if you do the job you have accepted and don't expect or demand extra or special considerations because you're a woman. That means ladies if you have to do a double pull on a roof you do it. SAFETY FIRST OF COURSE.

From the women I have seen in the field, the ones that were having problems were ones that tried to show how smart they were and how good they were, but unfortunately they didn't know nearly as much as they thought they did and they weren't nearly as good as they thought they were. I am not trying to criticize here. It is an observation that will hopefully help someone. We ALL learn everyday and none of us, whether man or woman, know it all and we never will. This is a good business no matter whether you're a man or a woman. A woman can make as much as a man can and go as far as a man can if they are willing to put in the effort. Jim you were right there is no substitute for educating yourself on Policy and knowing the policy and type of claims you are going to handle before you accept the assignment and DON'T GET IN OVER YOUR HEAD. If you don't know the policy you are going to be working with, and if you don't know how to write an estimate for that type of loss, then don't
go. That is a recipe for failure.
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Tom Joyce
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Username: Tjoyce

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Registered: 12-2001

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Posted on Sunday, April 28, 2002 - 8:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jim,
I second you on several points.
Education is not an option. Unless you are doing nothing more than hail on roof take the time to educate yourself. Lord knows that several members and Roy has provided the vehicles to get there, but you got to take the wheel and drive there.
Learn the basic policies, proper file handling and it will all fall in place.
With what we do find some one to teach you how to handle ALE, learn that correctly and it is the basis for advancement into BOP policies. I have had more problems with that in reviewing files than any other area, with the exception of adjusters making commentments in the field to insureds and contractors on questionable loss and policy coverages (do we know what that is called gang).
Jim named several adjusters, I also know several more female adjusters that I would be hard put to hold a candle to. They are knowledgable, good estimators, and insureds are more likely to "bond" with them, as opposed to someone that is 6'4" etc. They also work harder. Sorry guys, I used to be married to one.
Tom
830-305-5386
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Jim Flynt
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Post Number: 270
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Posted on Sunday, April 28, 2002 - 8:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Three of the very best cat adjusters that I know personally are women: Linda Asberry, Lee Mushaney and Cecelia Sharpe. All are knowledgeable, professional, respected and earning excellent incomes equal to any of their male counterparts.

Knowing each of them, I feel comfortable that they would be willing to share their thoughts on breaking into this profession and to answer any questions that our fairer sex newer adjusters might want to ask. Perhaps they better than anyone can share their stories of the unique challenges which women encounter in breaking into and surviving in this ruff and tumble work arena.

I do believe that all of them would concur that while OJT is nice, nothing suffices to replace the classroom training necessary to learn the nuances of policy and the claims handling process.

In my own opinion, policy knowledge just cannot be taught nor learned in the middle of a storm nor in the field.

While I used to train Newbees one on one during storm events, I learned painfully over time that it is impossible to teach policy, construction materials and process, and estimating/claims reporting to someone without some classroom training first.

Even where I had steered new adjusters through the Vale two week estimating class and all the way through the 4 part AIC and 3 part INS program, new adjusters still had a very hard time handling claim files on their own for a 3 to 6 month period minimum.

The other factor which caused me to stop training new adjusters as trainees during major storm events is that the time I was devoting to teaching and training was significantly affecting my own income and professional handling of my own files. It was, to put it nicely, a responsibility to not only handle my own files but to be responsible for the files of the trainee adjuster, and in the end, I just found that I could not do both.

Yes, field training and hands on experience from OJT is essential, and at some point in the process vital, but to ignore or defer the classroom portion of cat adjusting until after a storm or two is generally fruitless, deadly (from an E&O standpoint), and needlessly exposes the new trainee adjuster to a failure which can and will ultimely taint their reputation beyond recovery.

For what they are worth, those are my thoughts based on my own experience both as a mentor and equally as well, from my own initiation into this profession from having been thrown into the claims briarpatch AFTER some significant claims training and education.

The past two years have been tough times for all adjusters, even the seasoned pros, and many old timers have left this profession for other greener pastures of a reliable steady income and benefits.

While the income potential at times sound awesome, when the facts are separated from the realities of long periods without work, long periods away from home and family, the ever present need for expenses to stay current with technology and education, as well as the ever increasing cost of gas, travel, insurance, and hotel accommodations while away from home, then in totality, it takes someone interested in this profession for much more than money to survive and prosper. For anyone to look at cat adjusting purely for the income, they are destined for failure in the long run. The truth is, most of the survivors and seasoned veterans do this because helping others and significant travel to new places gets in their blood and they are hooked.

Best wishes to everyone trying to break into this profession as well as to those who are trying to hang on until Mother Nature once again cooperates.

Mark Twain once said, "when you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hold on." That message is all the more applicable during these trying times.

Good Luck.

(Message edited by jimflynt on April 28, 2002)

(Message edited by jimflynt on April 28, 2002)
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Roger D. Craft
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Posted on Sunday, April 28, 2002 - 4:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Donita
Apparently you missed the point of my post. I believe that if you can do the job then fine. Whether you are a man or a woman it really doesn't matter. The point that I was making is that I agree with you and with Whong. There is no replacement for OJT and no replacement for training.
This is not the old days when I started as lowly carpenter in the construction industry. Now to be successful in the construction industry most firms require classroom training. This is true in almost all fields of business.
I served the in Army also and traveled the world as you did, but I didn't have the pleasure of Germany. I have been there and enjoyed it very much. You have me beat. I only have 3 grand children.
I too am struggleing in the business but as I said before I am useing my down time to get more studies done.
Good luck with your endeavors as I know you wish for me.I apoligize if I offended you. I had no intention to do so, just stateing my opinion.
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Donita Taylor
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Username: Donilynn

Post Number: 10
Registered: 12-2001

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Posted on Sunday, April 28, 2002 - 11:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Roger,
First, you are wrong about me and life experience. I am 47, mother of 3, grand mother of 5, was in the Army when we were still called WAC's, have lived in Germany 6 yrs, traveled throughout the USA, Europe, and the Carribean, and have been in the working world since I was 16 and had to help my mother pay bills because my father left.
Second, I do plan to get as much classroom training as possible, but education comes in many forms. Class room education, if done properly, can add to the knowledge base, but so far the training that I have received in the class room has only taught me how to pass "the test" at the end. I've learned more from reading the posts on this site and working with a veteran last year than I did in any of the class rooms that I've been in.
What I'm seeing is the same old story in this business as an any other male dominated business. A woman has to work harder, know more and push harder to get in the door and then has to do the same to maintain the respect of the men and if she makes a mistake, just like a man does, then she is put into a spot light to show that a woman made a mistake.
I am rethinking whether I want to be in this industry, not because it's so hard to get into, but because the majority of the people that I've met. And I'm not the only one thinking this way. I know a man that is rethinking it for the same reason.
I may not get out this year, for personal family reasons, so I'll have another year to gain some more formal education and decide for sure if I want to proceed or just leave the bulls* to the rest of you.
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Roger D. Craft
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Posted on Saturday, April 27, 2002 - 3:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am comeing into this rather late but would like to add a comment or two. Donita has a good point in some regard's. There is no substitute for OJT, but you must also do as D Whong Whey suggest. Get all the training and classes that you can in the down time. I am new to this profession but have 35 years experience in the construction industry and have owned and opperated my on design build firm for the past 20 years. Retired now, but my wife says I can't fish and play golf all the time so have taken up this profession. Donita you sound rather young and have not had the benifit of life experience. In my other profession I was constantly going to classes and siminars. It was never ending and I expect this will be never ending.

I now hold license in 8 states and am working on my INS and AIC in this down time. I have gotten to know a lot of people in the industry and all have been helpful. As in any business it is networking. Take your own advice and also D Whoong's. He sounds like he is very knowledgable in the industry.

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Donita Taylor
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Posted on Friday, February 22, 2002 - 9:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

DWW, thanks for leaving the sarcasim in the trash where it belongs.

I agree,there is no replacement for the education, but a good apprenticeship program can be more valuable in making a professional adjuster than all the schooling in the world. I do plan on attaining all the necessary schooling, but being in the over 40 crowd, I know that I need to see it first, work it with someone that knows the ropes, then get the school. If I try to do the book learning first, I'll not learn as much. I would get some info out of it, but the full value of it wouldn't be attained.

Thanks to the others that piping up in my defense. It's nice to know that there are people out there that understand. I know that right now there are veterans sitting at home waiting for the storms, but I also know that storm season is just around the corner. I am just trying to let people know that there are newbees out here that need a guiding hand.

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D Wong Whey
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Posted on Friday, February 22, 2002 - 6:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bob, I do agree with your comment: "the cost of designations and training can be much especially when not working."

My point was that the cost of NOT HAVING training is even greater (whether working or not).

I think both you and Tom understand, and understand well, that those with claims training and some degree of claims education are generally rewarded more fully than those adjusters not possessing training/education.

For the uninitiated in training and education are always the very LAST to be called out to a storm event (even the largest ones) and always the FIRST sent packing to go home. They are also more predisposed to losing most if not all of their holdbacks due to mistakes borne of ignorance; mistakes which ultimately require the payment by the ignorant of the hidden costs of consumer/vendor disservice, higher E&O exposures, lack of renewal assignments due to vocational ineptitude, acquiring a poor claims handling reputation among the vendor community, and greater holdback losses.

In the long run, that is an extremely high price to pay for ignorance and educational apathy.

I agree that book learning alone does not an adjuster make, but I also believe conversely that without the proper foundation of education and training first, 99.99% of Newbees will either fail in the short run or fall by the wayside in the longer run. And in the end, that is the real tragedy in not expending whatever money, energy and resources required in order to lay the proper foundation with which to succeed.

Like it or not, there is no "free ride" into this profession. Success always carries a price which we can all choose to ignore, falsely fantasize otherwise, or ultimately choose to pay. The choice lies within the purview of each individual and that choice in the end will largely determine whether the person succeeds gloriously or fails miserably.

Lets be honest here. What strength lies in the resume of a Newbee adjuster which shows ONLY adjuster licensure by passing the generally simple state license exams? What training does such licensure only bring that enhances the chances for proper claims handling success?

The simple self study of an AIC property course or INS course would only set back a Newbee somewhere around $100.00 (One Hundred Dollars) and if the Newbee cannot afford even that small cost, undoubtedly, they will not be able to afford the even larger initial outlays for travel to and hotel at storm sites, computer hardware, estimating software, printers, cameras, measuring devices, and the other miscellaneous yet essential equipment necessary to function and prevail as a cat adjuster. We may not like that reality, but it remains a reality nevertheless.

If I stepped on some toes, my apologies, but I refuse to sugarcoat the truth.
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Bob Mitchell
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Posted on Friday, February 22, 2002 - 12:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


DWW, quit being a downer, just because she doesn't have a CPCUDIGABCRNORGA let her try. You were much too ruff. You, Mr. Knowledge, of all people should have been right in her corner.
But she slammed you with the remark comment, So she should make it as an adjuster, was not scared to confront you
. So now, don't post back one of your snidley snide comment or remarks. Post as a gentleman (that you are) and give her some good advise. As "YOU" should know, the cost of designations and training can be much especially when not working.Also, Donita, from what I hear and Know, you would do well just to work with the Pineapple sniffing DWW, his vast knowledge preceeds him, I heard "he" "does" know about this adjusting business.
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Tom Strickland
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Posted on Friday, February 22, 2002 - 12:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


Donita, Keep the faith, DWW is not "wrong" in his suggestions, sometimes "he" has a "pineapple" up his nose and gets to rambling. But "he" does mean well with what he says. I admire the fact that you "are" trying and believe me at "THIS" time of year and with a "lot " of people "not" working, and I mean long term professionals who "normally" work 6-10 months out of the year. You are striking out at the wrong time. Finding a trainer or other deals would be hard, but hang in there, it will happen or it won't but at least you have tried.
DWW, try not to burn these newbee's, remember, YOU and I both were there except it seemed a 150 years ago we had more stormsoh, well 150 for you and 120 for me.
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Donita Taylor
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Posted on Thursday, February 21, 2002 - 10:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for the encouragement Gale.

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Gale Hawkins
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Posted on Thursday, February 21, 2002 - 10:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Donita, what you are talking about sounds like an apprenticeship. It seems that the apprenticeship system has kind of have gone by the way side in our country but I understand it still competes with the classroom system in some parts of the world.

You make a good point about how when one is in business the needs come before the cash, which keeps a lot of people from going into business for themselves. The impossible can happen if you do not know it canít.
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Donita Taylor
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Posted on Thursday, February 21, 2002 - 10:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

In response to your post DWW, I am not saying that experience alone will get the job done. Of course education is important, and I'm not saying that our soldiers should be sent to war without first going through the right training.

Being a veteran myself, I do know that the military does provide for OJT (On the Job Training) for soldiers that have completed basic training and the very basic of job skill training. The rest of the training is done in the field. From my experience with different professions and as a soldier, people that have only gone to school and gotten the book training aren't as good in that field as those that have gone and "paid the dues" as it has been said, gotten some training, worked with a knowledgable mentor, then gotten some more formal education. These people are the ones that gain the respect of the people they work for and with because they have more substance than just book knowledge.

I am wanting to work with a vetern in this field and learn as much as possible and eventually I'll get all of the book training I can. What little I have worked in the field, I enjoyed it and I know that I learned more from my mentor than I did going through the lic process. The school taught me how to pass the state test, they didn't teach me how to adjust.

I want to be a professional and an all around education is the best not just book work. This field doesn't have a mentoring program and it is sad because without proper mentoring, the new "college grads" that are being sent to work in the field are going to ruin the reputations of the whole industry. Knowledge is more than just book learning, although it is a big part of it. Hands on training has to be a part of the whole package.

One thing that I have found from talking to a few of the people that have been in this industry for a while, is that they have forgotten that they were once themselves a newbee and have become very self righteous. Although, I have also met more that have not forgotten and do help a new person get started.

On a personal note, I found your post very sarcastic and the sarcasim very unnecessary. I will make this a career and I will be a professional. I just hope that I am able to avoid people like you that feel that only people with a college certificate should be helped and those of us that are willing to roll up our sleeves and take the working route aren't worth the effort.

Have a good day
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D Wong Whey
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Posted on Thursday, February 21, 2002 - 8:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Donita it is amazing isn't it that the carriers hire these young college graduates as adjuster trainees and then insist on sending them through the AIC classes and requiring passing of INS classes before they even let them do much more than make coffee, file reports and serve as glorified 'gophers'.

Shouldn't your reasoning extend to allowing new trainees to practice medicine, law, accounting, mortuary science, automobile mechanics, police work, firefighting, and various other service occupations by getting experience first and going to school later?

It causes one to wonder why our military sends young adults to boot camp before sending them off to war or up to fly multi-million dollar airplanes.

Think of all the money that could be saved by not requiring education and training prior to sending the vocationally challenged out to make money first and learn the profession later.

Good luck in what would appear to be your fruitless effort so far in reaching the pinnacles of this profession.

I suppose you would have us share your shame on this profession for not recognizing your seemingly innate God given natural talents to automatically know and understand the challenging aspects of complex insurance policies, the intricacies of insurance case law, and the myriad dimensions of proper construction repairs and estimating without any education and training other than acquiring an adjuster's license.

Your reasoning is either fatally flawed with no successful insurance future looming on your horizons or the insurance industry has failed to be seduced into wavering from it's long standing principle of education, training and testing, AND experience being the cornerstones of the foundations for success in adjusting.

Good luck in your hopes for an adjusting career. But until the insurance industry does a 180, I think you are looking at a tough row to hoe in the meantime. Wake up and see the world the way it is and not the way you want it to be.


(Message edited by dwongwhey on February 21, 2002)
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Donita Taylor
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Posted on Wednesday, February 20, 2002 - 9:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yes, I've thought about it, but with $$ being tight, any training that is going to cost is going to have to wait until I can either work a storm or two, or be forced to get a job back in a field that I hate.

After going through the lic process, I think all new adjusters should work a storm or two before going to school. I have a better perspective on things now and wish I had worked as a helper before getting my lic. I would have not felt so lost in the class. You can have all the book knowledge in the world and still not know how to do the job right. There is no replacement for experience.

I plan on getting as much formal training as possible, but that will have to come in time.

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D Wong Whey
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Posted on Wednesday, February 20, 2002 - 9:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Donita have you thought about enrolling in the AIC or INS programs to pick up professionally recognized designations as well as a pretty decent claims education while you are sitting around waiting for something to happen?
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Donita Taylor
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Username: Donilynn

Post Number: 5
Registered: 12-2001

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Posted on Sunday, February 17, 2002 - 3:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

May I pipe in as a newbee? I worked a storm with a veteran last year and I was so greatful. We have become friends and it is a friendship that I value very much. He working mold in San Antonio and won't be going on a cat for at least a year and he's still trying to help me get a job.

Without him taking me on, I wouldn't have gotten any of the knowledge that I have now, and I wouldn't even have a chance to work in this field.

This profession is very hard to break into. You need experience before anyone will hire you, but how do you get the experience if no one will hire you? Without you veterans taking us out and teaching us the right way of doing the job, teaching us to do it as a professional, then the alternative is that we learn from the not so professional people and our reputation as an industry goes down the drain.

I think that if a veteran adjuster takes the time and expense to train a new person, they are doing the profession a service.

Thanks for letting me vent.
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kenneth wayne smith
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Username: Ksmith

Post Number: 7
Registered: 1-2001

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Posted on Thursday, February 14, 2002 - 10:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. depends a lot on the trainee. i've tried three or four. two worked out good, 1 was mediocre, 1 was worthless. one problem is that they can easily cost more than they're worth when just starting out- you got to give them some kind of paycheck plus you got to pay their expenses on the road, plus you got to spend time working/training with them. and you got to watch them like a hawk- even a careful person can easily make a hugemongus mistake in paperwork while getting on-the-job training in a storm situation. be better if you could give them a little bit of a head start during your down time, and at least get them used to the paperwork and computer programs ahead of time. looking at the guys working around me, i sometimes think a man would be better off just marrying a good secretary.....
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Sonny Jenkins

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Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2001 - 12:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Over the years I've had several people (newbies) approach me to take them on storms as trainees,,,,,,I personally don't recall ever seeing other adjusters at cat sites training new people "on the job", but I understand it happens. Anyway I'm looking for feedback from those have taken trainees, how has it worked out??? what kind of compensation arrangement???etc???

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