Tags - Popular | FAQ  

PrevPrev Go to previous topic
NextNext Go to next topic
Last Post 04/05/2013 12:59 AM by  CatAdjusterX
California Newbie
 9 Replies
Sort:
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages
Auc31978
Guest
Guest
Posts:


--
03/04/2013 9:42 PM
    I got offered a job opportunity from a Partner in a claims co. and did a week ride a long with an adjuster. I'm in California which I am under the companies umbrella so don't have to get a CA. Liscense. I need to get a Texas liscense but with the new Texas law I can't get it without a CA liscense. Any suggestions?
    0
    CatAdjusterX
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:964


    --
    03/07/2013 3:17 AM

    Posted By AUCIII on 04 Mar 2013 09:42 PM
    I got offered a job opportunity from a Partner in a claims co. and did a week ride a long with an adjuster. I'm in California which I am under the companies umbrella so don't have to get a CA. License. I need to get a Texas license but with the new Texas law I can't get it without a CA license. Any suggestions?
    .....................................

    If you are exempt from California licensure, why do you need a Texas license?

    In any case my friend, in the future you should really do some of your own research before asking for answers. The most obvious place to seek out information pertaining to a Texas Non resident insurance adjuster's license would be................... maybe the Texas Department of Insurance? 

    You will find that most of us here on CADO will bend over backwards to help out the new folks PROVIDED said new folks make an attempt to find the answers on their own

    I found the following in all of 30 seconds on the TDI website, under Texas Non-resident licensure requirements

    Non-resident applicants who do not hold a current license in good standing in their state of residence must, through the law enforcement agency of that state, submit a copy of their criminal history records along with a completed license application and fees.  If the resident state will not provide a criminal history record for licensing purposes, the applicant must provide a FAST fingerprint receipt (Fingerprint Card Scan Authorization Form) received from L1 Enrollment Services or Pearson VUE evidencing that fingerprints have been submitted to the Texas Department of Public Safety.  They must pass the proper Texas licensing examination

    In closing, I would also suggest that you utilize the spell check feature on this site as well as your web browser prior to posting on a public website.

    I say as much because I and others have kicked back files due to spelling, CAPS, and punctuation errors. Even though this post is NOT a narrative, one should strive for uniformity on everything they write.



    "A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
    0
    AcceleratedAdjuster
    Member
    Member
    Posts:165


    --
    03/08/2013 8:03 AM
    Posted By CatAdjusterX on 07 Mar 2013 03:17 AM

    In closing, I would also suggest that you utilize the spell check feature on this site as well as your web browser prior to posting on a public website.

    I say as much because I and others have kicked back files due to spelling, CAPS, and punctuation errors. Even though this post is NOT a narrative, one should strive for uniformity on everything they write.


    I was going to make a similar, but slightly more colorful, comment regarding the utilization of spell check, especially here, where you will interact with peers and potential clients or employers, but I think that Robby summed it up nicely. 


    www.acceleratedadjusting.com www.acceleratedadjustingisrael.com
    0
    ChuckDeaton
    Life Member
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Posts:1110


    --
    03/10/2013 10:35 AM
    Come on now, let these newbies alone, sloth permeates their lives and their lack of knowledge and concern creates work.

    There is a whole level of quality control, called examiners, necessary to proof read work turned in by these people. Then think of the re-inspection work, the appraisal work, the umpire work and the number of litigated files.

    Work, work, work, all generated by newbies unwilling to proof their work.
    "Prattling on and on about being an ass with experience doesn't make someone experienced. It just makes you an ass." Rod Buvens, Pilot grunt
    0
    Medulus
    Moderator
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:786


    --
    03/10/2013 1:32 PM
    Robbie,

    Just a correction on the Texas license information you posted above. That process currently only applies to those who live in a state that has no licensure and therefore choose to make Texas their home license state. Under the current (new?) rules, it is neccessary to get licensed in one'w own state before obtaining the Texas license. Leslie is having the same problem with obtaining a Texas license because she does not yet have a California license, and she does not yet qualify for a California license. When I obtained my Texas license, I was a resident of Pennsylvania (which had no license requirement). The best advise to our newbie friend is to get the California license whether it is required or not. I currently am in process of doing just that. Until October I was on staff of ICW and did not require a license. Since October I am independent again and cannot work claims in California unless I am working for a company that holds a California license. So, no picking up daily claims for me until I get the license.

    If only he had been born in Texas!  I hear they hand you a Texas adjusters license when they give your parents the birth certificate.  May only be a rumor, but it has the ring of truth.

    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
    0
    CatAdjusterX
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:964


    --
    03/11/2013 5:51 AM
    Posted By Medulus on 10 Mar 2013 01:32 PM
    Robbie,

    Just a correction on the Texas license information you posted above. That process currently only applies to those who live in a state that has no licensure and therefore choose to make Texas their home license state. Under the current (new?) rules, it is neccessary to get licensed in one'w own state before obtaining the Texas license. Leslie is having the same problem with obtaining a Texas license because she does not yet have a California license, and she does not yet qualify for a California license. When I obtained my Texas license, I was a resident of Pennsylvania (which had no license requirement). The best advise to our newbie friend is to get the California license whether it is required or not. I currently am in process of doing just that. Until October I was on staff of ICW and did not require a license. Since October I am independent again and cannot work claims in California unless I am working for a company that holds a California license. So, no picking up daily claims for me until I get the license.

    If only he had been born in Texas!  I hear they hand you a Texas adjusters license when they give your parents the birth certificate.  May only be a rumor, but it has the ring of truth.

    ..............................

    Steve,

    I know that Texas can be used as a home state for licensing purposes (provided home state does NOT license adjusters ala' Colorado) I know that you can get a Texas license through reciprocity if you DO hold a license in your home state.

    Yet, I found (just a few days ago) out that you CAN get a Texas NON-resident license even of you don't hold a license in your home state that DOES license adjusters. You have to handle the additional requirements of your home state providing finger prints and Criminal History as well as taking the Texas exam.

    In any case, I don't get why this rookie adjuster (who posted the question to begin with) needs a Texas license. He states he doesn't need one to work in Ca and if that's the case, then why the need for a Texas license?

    "A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
    0
    Medulus
    Moderator
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:786


    --
    03/11/2013 8:15 PM
    He says he needs one. I needed one in Texas (and in Florida) when I worked at ICW, but that was so I could supervise claims we had assigned to adjusters in those states. Probably not the same reason our Fellow Californian, the aforementioned newbie, needs a Texas license. But there could be other reasons to get one. When it comes right down to it, though, there are so many adjusters in Texas, I haven't had an assignment there since 1995.
    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
    0
    CatAdjusterX
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:964


    --
    03/11/2013 10:53 PM

    Posted By Medulus on 11 Mar 2013 08:15 PM
    He says he needs one. I needed one in Texas (and in Florida) when I worked at ICW, but that was so I could supervise claims we had assigned to adjusters in those states. Probably not the same reason our Fellow Californian, the aforementioned newbie, needs a Texas license. But there could be other reasons to get one. When it comes right down to it, though, there are so many adjusters in Texas, I haven't had an assignment there since 1995.

    ...................................................

    I understood the first post, loved the second and was SOLD on the third!!



    "A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
    0
    kjmcooper
    Guest
    Guest
    Posts:1


    --
    04/01/2013 5:14 PM
    We all started somewhere and we were all incompetent at some point in time as well. Myself included. Picking on the newbie is bad manners, gentlemen. :)

    There is a good reason to have a Texas Non-Resident license in California. I currently hold 23 licenses and I handle claims throughout the North American Continent. But, the first license I obtained was Texas. Why?? Because it is reciprocal. Even though I was working under the managers license in California, this did not make me compliant in the other states.

    The California License is not reciprocal. Most adjusters working in California who may be sent on a CAT assignment, must have a non-resident Texas License. This license allows them to obtain temporary licensing in other states that are reciprocal with Texas. You may also be able to obtain other state licenses who also reciprocate with Texas by listing Texas as your designated home state. I was able to contact some states that had a similar requirement and provide them with the information they needed to show that I was compliant in California.

    It is my understanding that you can still take an online course and pass the Texas test. You will then need to pass the criminal check as well. If the laws have changed and there are additional requirements, the best thing to do is to call the TDI. I have always found them to be helpful.

    On another note, Florida and Indiana are also good licenses to obtain as many states reciprocate with them as well. Best of luck to you!
    0
    CatAdjusterX
    Veteran Member
    Veteran Member
    Posts:964


    --
    04/05/2013 12:59 AM

    Posted By Kelly on 01 Apr 2013 05:14 PM
    We all started somewhere and we were all incompetent at some point in time as well. Myself included. Picking on the newbie is bad manners, gentlemen. :)

    There is a good reason to have a Texas Non-Resident license in California. I currently hold 23 licenses and I handle claims throughout the North American Continent. But, the first license I obtained was Texas. Why?? Because it is reciprocal. Even though I was working under the managers license in California, this did not make me compliant in the other states.

    The California License is not reciprocal. Most adjusters working in California who may be sent on a CAT assignment, must have a non-resident Texas License. This license allows them to obtain temporary licensing in other states that are reciprocal with Texas. You may also be able to obtain other state licenses who also reciprocate with Texas by listing Texas as your designated home state. I was able to contact some states that had a similar requirement and provide them with the information they needed to show that I was compliant in California.

    It is my understanding that you can still take an online course and pass the Texas test. You will then need to pass the criminal check as well. If the laws have changed and there are additional requirements, the best thing to do is to call the TDI. I have always found them to be helpful.

    On another note, Florida and Indiana are also good licenses to obtain as many states reciprocate with them as well. Best of luck to you!
    .............................................

    Thank you for your wisdom. Just in case you weren't aware a non resident Texas license isn't reciprocal with many states. With a resident Texas license, reciprocal with approx. 32 states. Non resident, maybe a dozen or less



    "A good leader leads..... ..... but a great leader is followed !!" CatAdjusterX@gmail.com
    0
    You are not authorized to post a reply.


    These Forums are dedicated to discussion of Claims Adjusting.

    For the benefit of the community and to protect the integrity of the ecosystem, please observe the following posting guidelines: 
    • No Advertising. 
    • No vendor trolling / poaching. If someone posts about a vendor issue, allow the vendor or others to respond. Any post that looks like trolling / poaching will be removed.
    • No Flaming or Trolling.
    • No Profanity, Racism, or Prejudice.
    • Terms of Use Apply

      Site Moderators have the final word on approving / removing a thread or post or comment.