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Last Post 08/23/2009 1:21 PM by  Ed Bailey
Carrying a Ladder
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TXAD
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07/06/2009 11:16 PM

    I need to find a way to carry my 26' extension ladder, and I'd like to attach it to my 30' trailer somehow.  I'd rather not put a rack on my truck, if I can figure out a better way.  Any suggestions?...or info on what NOT to do?

     

    Thanks in advance.

     

    Bud

    mbradbury
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    07/07/2009 3:40 AM
    Bud, I think you haven't gotten any responses yet because nobody knows exactly what you're talking about. Is your trailer a travel trailer, a utility trailer, a horse trailer? Do you pull your trailer around with your truck while adjusting, and if so, WHY? Is your ladder 26' long when extended, or are you saying it's that long while folded. I mean, what the heck are you talking about man???
    I do it because I want to provide a better life for my family than my parents could provide for me.
    BobH
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    07/07/2009 10:26 PM
    Posted By TXAD on 06 Jul 2009 11:16 PM

    I need to find a way to carry my 26' extension ladder, and I'd like to attach it to my 30' trailer somehow.  I'd rather not put a rack on my truck, if I can figure out a better way.  

    A 26' ladder will consist of 2 sections 13' long, won't the thing fit IN your 30' trailer?

    I favor vans (the château Chevrolet) but if you own a pickup and don't want a full rack - have you seen the things that stick in the "stake-bed" holes on the top of a truck bed that give you a small rack just over the height of the cab so the ladder doesn't bang your paint?  you can stuff the end of it into the bed by the tailgate and it will rise above the cab, or there is a shorter bar-thing they make that sticks into the rear holes of the bed so the ladder sits more level, like this one http://www.usrack.com/back_rack.php   (that's a 24' ladder in the photo, 12' long before extended)

     



     

    Bob H
    TXAD
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    07/08/2009 9:51 PM
    mbradgury, I guess I wasn't all too clear on my delima (sorry). I have a 30' travel trailer, pulled by a Dodge diesel. I'd like to find a way to attach it to the outside, just to haul to locations, at which point I'd haul it in my p/u truck to work claims. I really like the rack system that BobH showed (thanks for the research), but I have a Roll-N-Lock bed cover over it now, and the bed holes are no longer exposed. I'd be willing to mount it on the top, if I could find a good way to secure it, so that no damage is done to the trailer top. BobH is correct, in that it retracts to 13'. I haven't tried to put it inside, because I hauled my 12' awning in there once, and it took 2 people to get it in and out, to prevent damage to the interior of the trailer.

    Thanks again.
    BobH
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    07/08/2009 10:09 PM
    Posted By TXAD on 08 Jul 2009 09:51 PM 
    I'd be willing to mount it on the top, if I could find a good way to secure it, so that no damage is done to the trailer top. 

    Have you seen those Rivet-Nut thingies?  That's how I put a commercial rack on my van (I will drill a hole in anything, this stuff is meant to be used).  Anyway you get the correct hole drilled from above, put some silicone around it, put the Riv-Nut in there, tighten the bolt so it squashes out the rivet thing on the inside, remove the bolt, and you have a threaded insert thing permanently mounted on the sheet metal.  That's how they mount factory side mirrors on doors, if you ever had to replace one. 

    Granger, or Fastinal carry them, and body shop supply places.  You may also want to consider having some rowdy parties inside your trailer, so you don't have to worry about banging up the interior any more...

     

    Bob H
    sdraeger
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    07/09/2009 8:11 AM
    Here's how I do it. I have a 34 fifth wheel that I carry a 40', 24' and a 16' ladder on top of. I lay a 2x6 down on the rubber roof to spread the weight out then I put the 40 footer on the 2x6, I then put the 24' on top of the 40', finally I put the 16' on top of all of them. I installed two heavy duty eyebolts through the sidewalls on the trailer. Then I use a heavy ratchet strap over the top of all of them to secure them. The rear of the 40 footer rests on the ladder/luggage rack on the back of the trailer. So far I have not had any problems wiht this set up. Yes I drilled a couple of holes in the side of the trailer, but like Bob says these things are meant to be used.
    WILLIS
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    07/14/2009 7:01 PM
    You guys just kill me hauling all these ladders you look like a painter do you carry walkboards as well I have been adjusting for 37 years I have one 18 ft fold up Little Giant my rule if the roof is taller than my ladder go to plan B that is why it is called adjusting For the guy with the 30' trailer either stick it inside or get a side mount rack
    I can remember Omaha 2006 was a 28' ladder on a pickup that was not secure and visited the center of the interstate what a joy trying to dodge that road hazard
    LarryW
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    07/14/2009 8:06 PM
    Work floods. Then you won't need a ladder. Unless it was a really deep one.
    No one is absolutely worthless, at the very least you can serve as a bad example.
    BobH
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    07/14/2009 9:14 PM
    Posted By WILLIS on 14 Jul 2009 07:01 PM
    You guys just kill me hauling all these ladders you look like a painter do you carry walkboards as well I have been adjusting for 37 years I have one 18 ft fold up Little Giant... 

    Do you really think you are sending a good message to the community to recommend that adjusters should not carry a 2 story ladder?  You don't have to go out and buy one, but to ridicule others for carrying a 2 story ladder adds NOTHING to this forum.  That road leads to increased tendency to double pulls, when the 2nd story could be accessed safely with proper equipment.

    When I am not on a 2-story steep team, I don't use my 2 story ladder that often - but to bust someone else's balls for carrying one is out of line.

    Posted By LarryW on 14 Jul 2009 08:06 PM
    Work floods. Then you won't need a ladder. Unless it was a really deep one.

    With the NFIP "single adjuster rule" he will still have to get on the roof.  This house I looked at in Slidell had a 5' water line inside



    Bob H
    sdraeger
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    07/14/2009 9:56 PM
    Thanks for the support. During Ike I used the 16 footer for 90% of the claims I did. I only used the forty footer once but I had it and did not have to go back or figure out plan "B". The 16 footer is actualy 1/2 of a larger ladder. It is light and easy to use. I like having the right tool available. The little giant is much heavier than my 16 footer.
    I worked as a desk adjuster for a little while last year and one IA did not require their adjuster's to carry a second story ladder. These files were a constant headache because we had to send them back, they had to find a roofer etc...........
    Having the right tool at hand is the only way to go. It is much safer also.
    TXAD
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    07/17/2009 11:19 PM

    I worked 100% of Ike with a 16' ladder, but the co. I plan to work withthis yr.  "requires" a 26' ladder.  Otherwise, I wouldn't worry about it.

    I wasn't asking for peoples' opinions about whether or not I NEEDED to carry one.  I was asking for ideas on how to carry one.

     

    Thank you to all who submitted ideas.  I will probably attempt to put it on top, like suggested.

    Jud G.
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    07/20/2009 11:25 AM

    I put my fold-up little giant ladder on the top of my car with a luggage rack and ended up losing 7 miles per gallon because of wind drag.  I then built a wooden seat protector so that it won't scrape up the carpet while the back seat is folded down.

    I say this to indicate that you may wish to explore an alternative way of attaching your two story ladder 'within' the window area of your truck opposed to the top of the truck while going to appointments.  That way it would reduce the amount of wind drag like the traditional painter's ladder rack.

    I've heard the Telesteps ladders are safer these days.  I'm looking into getting one that can stretch to 18' and will fit on a motorcycle.  As for two story applications, I rarely need them down here in south Alabama to the point that it is worth just acquiring the assistnace of a roofer when I need it.  Different areas of the country are more prone than others regarding the necessity of having rope/harness and or two story ladders.

    Medulus
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    07/20/2009 11:33 AM
    There is more than one way a ladder on the roof is a hazard. I used to stick my 12 foot fold up ladder and my 22 foot fold up ladder on the roof of my van. When I came to San Diego to work the wildfires, I had to fly out to get started. My wife drove the van with most of my equipment out. On the way, she stopped to play a little slots at Harrah's New Orleans. She pulled into the parking garage without thinking about the ladders on the roof. You can probably guess the rest.

    The ladders didn't fit. They got stuck, making a large dent in the roof of the van and destroying the rack that held the ladders. Since there was room inside the van for the twelve foot and not the 22 foot ladder, it was left behind at Harrah's with a grateful parking lot attendant.
    Steve Ebner CPCU AIC AMIM

    "With great power comes great responsibility." (Stanley Martin Lieber, Amazing Fantasy # 15 August 1962)
    Ray Hall
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    07/20/2009 11:52 AM

    I have used several ladders that are wood or metal that I could put in the trunk or fold down the seat. These long ladders have a place for the roofing contractors who use them and I have been able to get some roofer to get me on a roof if I really wanted to get on the roof. On the other hand I have NEVER had a roof claim turned down because I did not get on the roof. I kinda look at a roof like I do a flooded basement. I inspect the basement and if its flooded I do not get my feet wet. I have even used other people to take pictures of the slopes I would not walk on. I think this whole roof thing is getting out of hand.

    BobH
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    07/20/2009 9:46 PM
    Posted By Ray Hall on 20 Jul 2009 11:52 AM

    .... I kinda look at a roof like I do a flooded basement. I inspect the basement and if its flooded I do not get my feet wet. I have even used other people to take pictures of the slopes I would not walk on. I think this whole roof thing is getting out of hand.

    I just looked at a flooded basement today (deployed in Michigan, wind event of 6-25-09 put trees in houses and knocked out power for 3 days, sump pump - drain backups).

    Rubber boots are cheap.  I measure and scope all covered damages, and get where I need to go.  Over the years I have crawled on my belly like a reptile to see if there is coverage - or if there is excluded rot under every claimed bathroom/kitchen of a house on a raised foundation, with photos and screwdriver shoved in the rotten wood.  If a termite / home inspector can do it, I can do it.

    This isn't a matter of "out of hand", it is just the tools that occasionally are needed.  You may borrow a ladder occasionally from a professional roofer, I choose to bring my own.  And I am not alone.  It's not that one adjuster is better, worse, more experienced, we are just getting these clams closed the best way we can.

     

    Bob H
    Scott Flinchum
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    08/07/2009 5:15 PM
    There is one possible solution to carrying a ladder other than on the roof or in the vehicle, and that is a receiver/hitch-mounted ladder rack. Similar to a hitch-mounted bicycle rack. I've seen photos on a website before, but unfortunately now I can't find it. I realize this won't be practical for a standard 26' extension ladder w/ 13' per side, but it looked pretty durn handy for a LG or similar fold-up "multi-purpose" ladder. I'm in the market now for an extendable 26' fold-up ladder (shopping for the Werner MT-26) and wanted to look at options for hauling it around. If anyone is familiar with this hitch-mounted ladder rack or knows the website, please let me know. I will probably try to post a new thread too just so I can get more eyes on it. I've searched the forums here, and googled "hitch mount ladder rack" until I'm blue in the face and so far I'm not having any luck finding it again.

    Cheers all,
    Scott Flinchum
    Mike B
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    08/07/2009 10:12 PM

    You guys are tough on each other.

    I do agree however that I do not do 2 story access nor do I walk anything over 8/12.

    If I wanted to be a roofer, I would have... call a local roofer for access

     

    Mike B

    Ray Hall
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    08/07/2009 10:23 PM

    I do not think I have ever lost one penny by not walking on a steep roof. I have respect for the people who have the training and tools. I guess it goes like this" thats why  you do what you do" with your tools and I " do what I do with my tools"

    lasertape
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    08/08/2009 6:13 PM
    How are you carrying the ladder on your truck? I have a buddy with the Roll-n-Lock and he has the same problem. I think he is going to try a headache rack that attached to the front of the bed in conjunction with another part installed in the receiver hitch.
    OdieWyatt
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    08/08/2009 10:01 PM
    The Little Giant model 26 fits in the bed of a pickup with a 6 1/2 foot bed with about 1/2 inch to spare. The model 26 is only 23' when extended, so I don't know if it qualifies for a company that requires a 26 footer. You can put the shorter (and lighter) model 17 next to it in the bed and use it for 90% of the claims.
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