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CatAdjuster.org Knowledge Base

CatAdjuster.org has been online since 1995 and as a result the membership has provided a lot of information on subjects ranging from the Appraisal Process to Z├╝rich claims. However, over the years the information has been posted in many different areas. What we hope to do with area is centralize access to this information and hopefully make it easier to locate.

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The Weather Underground
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The Tropical page for the Weather Underground site.



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The Weather Channel Hurricane Central
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Hurricane information from the Weather Channel



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The NHC
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National Hurricane Center Home Page



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StormPulse
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Hurricane Tracking site that uses custom software for the tracking map.



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NOAA Storm Surge Page
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From the page;
Along the coast, storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property from a hurricane. In the past, large death tolls have resulted from the rise of the ocean associated with many of the major hurricanes that have made landfall. Hurricane Katrina (2005) is a prime example of the damage and devastation that can be caused by surge. At least 1500 persons lost their lives during Katrina and many of those deaths occurred directly, or indirectly, as a result of storm surge.


Storm Surge vs. Storm Tide

Storm surge is an abnormal rise of water generated by a storm, over and above the predicted astronomical tides. Storm surge should not be confused with storm tide, which is defined as the water level rise due to the combination of storm surge and the astronomical tide. This rise in water level can cause extreme flooding in coastal areas particularly when storm surge coincides with normal high tide, resulting in storm tides reaching up to 20 feet or more in some cases.


Source: NOAA
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NOAA Factsheet - Hurricanes and Oil Spill
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From the document;
 
 What will happen to a hurricane that runs through
this oil slick?
• Most hurricanes span an enormous area of the ocean (200-300 miles) — far wider than the current size of the spill.
• If the slick remains small in comparison to a typical hurricane’s general environment and size, the anticipated impact on the hurricane would be minimal.
• The oil is not expected to appreciably affect either the intensity or the track of a fully developed tropical storm or hurricane.
• The oil slick would have little effect on the storm surge or near-shore wave heights.
 
To read more you can download the pdf below. 


Source: NOAA
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Download: NOAA_fact_sheet_on_hurricanes_and_oil_spills.572167
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NOAA 2010 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook: Summary
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NOAA’s 2010 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook calls for an 85% chance of an above normal season. The outlook indicates only a 10% chance of a near-normal season and a 5% chance of a below-normal season. See NOAA definitions of above-, near-, and below-normal seasons. The Atlantic hurricane region includes the North Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea, and the Gulf of Mexico.

This outlook reflects an expected set of conditions that is very conducive to increased Atlantic hurricane activity. This expectation is based on the prediction of three climate factors, all of which are conducive historically to increased tropical cyclone activity. These climate factors are: 1) the tropical multi-decadal signal, which has contributed to the high-activity era in the Atlantic basin that began in 1995, 2) exceptionally warm sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea (called the Main Development Region), and 3) either ENSO-neutral or La Niña conditions in the tropical Pacific, with La Niña becoming increasingly likely. In addition, dynamical models forecasts of the number and strength of tropical cyclones also predict a very active season.

The conditions expected this year have historically produced some very active Atlantic hurricane seasons. The 2010 hurricane season could see activity comparable to a number of extremely active seasons since 1995. If the 2010 activity reaches the upper end of our predicted ranges, it will be one of the most active seasons on record.

We estimate a 70% probability for each of the following ranges of activity this season:

  • 14-23 Named Storms,
  • 8-14 Hurricanes
  • 3-7 Major Hurricanes
  • An ACE range of 155%-270% of the median.

The seasonal activity is expected to fall within these ranges in 7 out of 10 seasons with similar climate conditions and uncertainties to those expected this year. They do not represent the total possible ranges of activity seen in past similar years.

Hurricane Landfalls:
It only takes one storm hitting your area to cause a disaster, regardless of the activity predicted in the seasonal outlook. Therefore, residents, businesses, and government agencies of coastal and near-coastal regions are urged to prepare every hurricane season regardless of this, or any other, seasonal outlook.

While NOAA does not make an official seasonal hurricane landfall outlook, the historical probability for multiple U.S. hurricane strikes, and for multiple hurricane strikes in the region around the Caribbean Sea, increases sharply for exceptionally active (i.e. hyperactive) seasons (ACE > 175% of median). However, predicting where and when hurricanes will strike is related to daily weather patterns, which are not predictable weeks or months in advance. Therefore, it is currently not possible to reliably predict the number or intensity of landfalling hurricanes at these extended ranges, or whether a given locality will be impacted by a hurricane this season.



Source: NOAA
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March 2010 Hurricane Forecast from AccuWeather.com
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 The forecast is calling for a much more active 2010 season with above-normal threats on the U.S. coastline.

 
"This year has the chance to be an extreme season," said Bastardi. "It is certainly much more like 2008 than 2009 as far as the overall threat to the United States' East and Gulf coasts."
 
Bastardi is forecasting seven landfalls. Five will be hurricanes, and two or three of the hurricanes will be major landfalls for the U.S.
 
He is calling for 16 to 18 tropical storms in total, 15 of which would be in the western Atlantic or Gulf of Mexico, and therefore a threat to land.
In a typical season, there are about 11 named storms, of which two to three impact the coast of the United States.

 



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ICAT Damage Estimator
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From the site:

ICAT developed this website to provide easy access to historical hurricane damage information. All information is open source and based upon publicly available data. The data has been normalized to reflect current inflation, wealth, and population from what existed at the time of the actual storm activity.

It is our expectation that this website will be a useful tool to media sources, local, state, and federal public officials, the scientific and academic community, the insurance and reinsurance industries, and to other interested individuals.

For more information about navigating and searching the data in this website, see the “How to Use This Site” section. For details about the open source data, see the FAQ section.

ICAT extends special thanks to Joel Gratz formerly of ICAT Holdings for his initiative and vision to create and launch the ICAT Damage Estimator, and to Dr. Roger Pielke Jr. of the University of Colorado for his scientific and academic leadership, and his drive to deliver important and relevant information to the broader community.



Source: ICAT
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Hurricane and Windstorm Deductibles
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Follow this link for information on Hurricane and windstorm deductibles.

http://www.iii.org/issues_updates/hurricane-and-windstorm-deductibles.html




Source: Insurance Information Institute
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